Walk A Lonely Street - now available

Anything about Elvis
More than 100 Million visitors can't be wrong

Moderators: FECC-Moderator, Moderator5, Moderator3, Site Mechanic

User avatar

Topic author
George Smith
Posts: 3598
Registered for: 15 years 5 months
Location: Down at the end of Lonely Street
Been thanked: 2025 times

Walk A Lonely Street - now available

Post by George Smith »

Dear friends and fellow fans,

All things being well, tonight I will press the PUBLISH button on the book that has taken me almost ten years to research and write. Assuming all goes smoothly with the Amazon administration process, the book should be available as a paperback before the end of the week.

Many of you have journeyed with me on this epic undertaking, offering advice, photographs, revelations, support and good criticism, and I find myself unable to adequately express my gratitude. This book would have been impossible to complete without the good people on this forum, so I hope you will accept my simple but heartfelt Thank You in this post.

I've read and re-read the proofs dozens of times and, doubtless, there will still be errors or sections that could have been written in a clearer or better fashion but, to quote from Scorsese's recent gem, "It is what it is", and it's time for me to abandon the re-writes and print.

Below you will find the details of the publication and I'll add a link once the page itself is up and running. I have also sent out a number of early-copies to movers and shakers within the Elvis world and I include the encouraging reviews that I have so far received.

Thank you, once again, for your support and patience!

************************

Walk A Lonely Street: Elvis Presley, Country Music & The True Story of Heartbreak Hotel is a unique volume that tells the tale of Elvis Presley’s rise to fame as viewed through the lens of his era-defining first hit record, “Heartbreak Hotel”. Presented as a series of consecutive short stories, it offers a new perspective on Presley’s musical and cultural achievements, and reveals the true and dramatic saga behind the breakthrough song that launched his career and changed the world.

WALK A LONELY STREET: Elvis Presley, Country Music & The True Story of Heartbreak Hotel by Tony Plews
• Published week beginning 14th December 2020 via Amazon
• £17.99 + postage
• The in-depth story of Elvis Presley’s rise to fame, as viewed through the lens of “Heartbreak Hotel”
• An Elvis Presley book like no other
• Almost a decade of research, writing and revisions
• 200,000 words, 700 pages and 563 tales to be told
• 33 photographs, documents and articles, most previously unpublished or unseen since the 1950s
• A chapter devoted to every Presley recording session 1953-1956
• Made with the assistance of the families and estates of Tommy Durden, Mae Boren Axton, Agnes Sampson and Delta Pinney, including the only living witness to the event that inspired the songwriters

********************
Review by Justin Gausman, December 2020, host of TCBCast: An Unofficial Elvis Presley Fan Podcast and director of Never Been to Graceland.

To refer to Walk A Lonely Street as merely a book about Elvis Presley would be a great disservice to what Tony Plews has crafted. It is a sweeping historical rock-and-roll epic, a true story as eminently digestible and cleverly written as a mystery thriller. The subtitle Elvis Presley, Country Music & The True Story of Heartbreak Hotel is just as important to understanding the wide canvas across time and distance that Plews uses to paint his picture.

ELVIS PRESLEY:
Without question, Walk A Lonely Street is one of the most essential books ever written regarding Elvis Presley, right alongside Peter Guralnick's famous two-part biography. But those looking for a straightforward biography will not find it here. Where Guralnick wrote a definitive recounting of the events of Elvis Presley's life, Plews has written perhaps the definitive book on understanding Elvis Presley's career as an artist. Plews is clear very early on that he will be using literary techniques rather than biographical ones, and the work is stronger for it.

Plews' prose is concise but never clinical; on the contrary, it's often warm and shows great compassion or affection for the story's many characters, even hucksters like Elvis' manager Tom Parker. Plews doesn't seek to aggrandize, but merely to humanize and in doing so restores some sense of why what archetypal figures like Hank Williams or Elvis Presley were doing was all that remarkable to begin with.

COUNTRY MUSIC:
My favorite pieces of Walk A Lonely Street are the chapter titles. Broken up into several hundred separate entries, often only one or two pages at a time, each chapter highlights a relevant character or scene in broadly chronological order. Immaculately researched, Plews finds and highlights connections and coincidences throughout the history of popular and country music in the early-to-mid-20th century that seem so narratively convenient one would be forgiven for initially believing they couldn't possibly be true, but upon further investigation, are in fact very real. Plews plays with expectations, uses foreshadowing brilliantly, and has made Walk A Lonely Street the first book relating to Elvis Presley that I've read in over a decade offering genuine surprises and revelations.

Those who have been long-time Presley fans and have dove into the history of the era will be deeply rewarded comparable to the way comic book movie fans are served up Easter Eggs within a cinematic universe.

As an example of my favorite: one entry is titled "Hank Snow's first American recordings." Set in 1949, the title is a literal descriptor as the chapter describes Snow, a Canadian country musician who later inspired Elvis, making his first recordings in the United States, including a song entitled "I'm Movin' On," in a session produced by RCA Victor artist & repertoire man Steve Sholes - who served in the same capacity for Presley in the 1950s. But near the end of the book, in a scene set in 1969, we read a chapter titled "Elvis Presley's first American recordings." The title takes on a different meaning as Elvis arrives at Memphis-based American Sound Studios to lay down famous songs like "Suspicious Minds," and as an aside, Plews shrewdly mentions that Elvis also "taped a song from Hank Snow" there. Elvis fans reading this review are already with me - although unspoken, we know it is the same "I'm Movin' On."

Walk A Lonely Street is full to the brim with such knowing winks and nods, all expertly alluded to without losing sight of the story at hand.

THE TRUE STORY OF HEARTBREAK HOTEL:
Because of the nature of the book, its setting, and its subject, attention is inevitably placed more heavily on the predominantly white and male history-makers, but where relevant, Plews does bring into the story people of color whose lives and contributions have too often been overlooked by comparison, such as Lesley Riddle, Johnny Bragg, Arthur Crudup, The Platters, Ray Charles and Big Mama Thornton. I was pleased to see even my favorite deep-cut influence on Elvis, "rock and soul" ballad singer Roy Hamilton get spotlighted in the book.

"Heartbreak Hotel" co-writer Mae Boren Axton, as one of the central figures of the story, receives as thorough a biographical treatment as any of her male counterparts and hers is a remarkable story in and of itself, as a woman and mother fighting to succeed in an industry run by powerful and influential men. Plews not only explores the question that has been raised in some circles as to whether she was deserving of credit for writing the famous hit, but understands the cultural flaws inherent in the premise of the question, and draws a compelling conclusion from the more comprehensive perspective of her greater life story, though is always clear his interpretation is only one.

And finally, the remarkable tragedy behind the very real end of a human life that inspired "Heartbreak Hotel" is just as vital to the overall tale as Presley's or Boren Axton's. The story of Alvin Krolick, the troubled yet fascinating man who described himself as "a person who walks on a lonely street" looms darkly over the entire book, building to a breaking point. It is the one story told in Walk A Lonely Street that cannot be found recounted as thoroughly in any other other telling, and Plews brings the receipts: photos and historical documents finally put faces to the players. I hesitate to spoil anything further as it will likely be a revelation for most readers as it was for me, even more so than all the information about Presley and country music. I will say that the final, autobiographical entry in the book, from Plews' own perspective, is heart-breaking and poetic in its simplicity given the beast of a book that precedes it.

In short, Walk A Lonely Street: Elvis Presley, Country Music & The True Story of Heartbreak Hotel joins the ranks of Peter Guralnick's Last Train to Memphis and Careless Love, Ernst Jørgensen's A Life in Music and Alanna Nash's trio of Elvis-related books as one of the handful of truly essential reads on the subject, and should be on the shelf of any enthusiast of early country and rock music history as well.

I cannot recommend it highly enough.

********************
Review by Gordon Minto, October 2020, author of Elvis on Television 1956-1960 and writer for Elvis: The Man and His Music.

Walk A Lonely Street has all the hallmarks of a thriller: a complicated plotline, great characters, plus tantalising pieces of the jigsaw which leads up to the denouement of the tale and beyond. Recounted in a sprightly and often comic way, it holds the reader’s attention throughout and does what all good books should do: engage, entertain and illuminate.

The author’s writing style is vibrant, highly literate, and compelling, drawing the reader into the complex narrative, but doing so in a most accessible way, judiciously employing literary devices such as repetition to underscore points and help signpost what is to follow. Coincidences and parallels abound in the careers of Eddy Arnold, Elvis Presley and countless others! People whose names previously have merely been just that – names – have been fleshed out and made real, and their roles put into context with reference to Elvis.

Although much of the material is historical – some it dating way back long before Elvis existed (the first story begins in 1865) – it is extremely well researched (using source material from eminent and highly respected writers) and beautifully written in a rather droll and ironically amusing manner.

Presented as a series of short stories (many bearing pithy titles) - in which the writer seamlessly merges fact and ideas from his own imagination in a very credible way - clues are laid down for the reader to follow as all the bits in the jigsaw (involving a huge cast of players) begin to come together in a coherent and powerful way. Crucially, you get the feeling that you are there – and so can visualise the action in an almost cinematic way - as he unravels the stories and, of course, it makes you want to read on – as you would with a gripping novel.

Fascinating stuff!

*******************************

Review by Trevor O'Sullivan, December 2020, host of Elvis Presley: His Truth is Marching On Facebook group

​As well as being a passionate fan of Elvis, I’ve found myself become, through my Facebook group chat, constantly debunking fake Elvis history. I am passionate about fans of the future being left a legacy of truth. The Elvis story doesn’t need embellishment as it’s a fascinating rags to riches tale. 

With so many books being written on Elvis it seems the well had run dry. That was until a writer by the name of Tony Plews took research and a search for facts and not myth to the utmost degree.

His book on the origins of "Heartbreak Hotel", Walk A Lonely Street,  is a revelatory tome on the history of Elvis and rock and roll music. It’s a tour de force bringing the reader back in time. He does this in a very clever way through short tales which all mesh together to reveal the bigger picture.

In a world where Elvis image often usurps his music and history this book is refreshing change of pace. History can sometimes be daunting to read, but I can assure you that this reads like a short sharp series of mystery and thrillers.

You’ll never listen to "Heartbreak Hotel" the same way again.
Last edited by George Smith on Mon Dec 14, 2020 4:52 pm, edited 4 times in total.



WALK A LONELY STREET
Elvis Presley, Country Music &
The True Story of Heartbreak Hotel

Now available from Amazon

http://www.GeorgeSmithPublications.com
https://www.facebook.com/WalkALonelyStreet/
User avatar

Rocker
Posts: 1422
Registered for: 14 years 6 months
Location: Germany
Has thanked: 163 times
Been thanked: 213 times

Re: Walk A Lonely Street

Post by Rocker »

Congratulations and thanks for the heads-up!


Well, hello there....
User avatar

MikeFromHolland
Posts: 7476
Registered for: 10 years 7 months
Has thanked: 2447 times
Been thanked: 6577 times

Re: Walk A Lonely Street

Post by MikeFromHolland »

.

Man, how I am looking forward to have your baby in my hands. This might be the Elvis book of the decade and very affordable as well. Many books aren’t anymore.

Thank you for all the serious hard work on this and congratulations!

.


Mike

------
lay back,
take it easy
And try a smile...

.
User avatar

jurasic1968
Posts: 11600
Registered for: 10 years 3 months
Has thanked: 10593 times
Been thanked: 2115 times

Re: Walk A Lonely Street

Post by jurasic1968 »

Congratulations, George.



jbgude
Posts: 643
Registered for: 19 years 4 months
Has thanked: 21 times
Been thanked: 29 times

Re: Walk A Lonely Street

Post by jbgude »

Congratulations! I look forward to reading the walk down lonely street.



Scarre
Posts: 5050
Registered for: 19 years 7 months
Been thanked: 1293 times

Re: Walk A Lonely Street

Post by Scarre »

George Smith wrote:
Sun Dec 13, 2020 1:09 pm
Dear friends and fellow fans,

All things being well, tonight I will press the PUBLISH button on the book that has taken me almost ten years to research and write. Assuming all goes smoothly with the Amazon administration process, the book should available as a paperback before the end of the week.

Many of you have journeyed with me on this epic undertaking, offering advice, photographs, revelations, support and good criticism, and I find myself unable to adequately express my gratitude. This book would have been impossible to complete without the good people on this forum, so I hope you will accept my simple but heartfelt Thank You in this post.

I've read and re-read the proofs dozens of times and, doubtless, there will still be errors or sections that could have been written in a clearer or better fashion but, to quote from Scorsese's recent gem, "It is what it is", and it's time for me to abandon the re-writes and print.

Below you will find the details of the publication and I'll add a link once the page itself is up and running. I have also sent out a number of early-copies to movers and shakers within the Elvis world and I include the encouraging reviews that I have so far received.

Thank you, once again, for your support and patience!

************************

Walk A Lonely Street: Elvis Presley, Country Music & The True Story of Heartbreak Hotel is a unique volume that tells the tale of Elvis Presley’s rise to fame as viewed through the lens of his era-defining first hit record, “Heartbreak Hotel”. Presented as a series of consecutive short stories, it offers a new perspective on Presley’s musical and cultural achievements, and reveals the true and dramatic saga behind the breakthrough song that launched his career and changed the world.

WALK A LONELY STREET: Elvis Presley, Country Music & The True Story of Heartbreak Hotel by Tony Plews
• Published week beginning 14th December 2020 via Amazon
• £17.99 + postage
• The in-depth story of Elvis Presley’s rise to fame, as viewed through the lens of “Heartbreak Hotel”
• An Elvis Presley book like no other
• Almost a decade of research, writing and revisions
• 200,000 words, 700 pages and 563 tales to be told
• 33 photographs, documents and articles, most previously unpublished or unseen since the 1950s
• A chapter devoted to every Presley recording session 1953-1956
• Made with the assistance of the families and estates of Tommy Durden, Mae Boren Axton, Agnes Sampson and Delta Pinney, including the only living witness to the event that inspired the songwriters

********************
Review by Justin Gausman, December 2020, host of TCBCast: An Unofficial Elvis Presley Fan Podcast and director of Never Been to Graceland.

To refer to Walk A Lonely Street as merely a book about Elvis Presley would be a great disservice to what Tony Plews has crafted. It is a sweeping historical rock-and-roll epic, a true story as eminently digestible and cleverly written as a mystery thriller. The subtitle Elvis Presley, Country Music & The True Story of Heartbreak Hotel is just as important to understanding the wide canvas across time and distance that Plews uses to paint his picture.

ELVIS PRESLEY:
Without question, Walk A Lonely Street is one of the most essential books ever written regarding Elvis Presley, right alongside Peter Guralnick's famous two-part biography. But those looking for a straightforward biography will not find it here. Where Guralnick wrote a definitive recounting of the events of Elvis Presley's life, Plews has written perhaps the definitive book on understanding Elvis Presley's career as an artist. Plews is clear very early on that he will be using literary techniques rather than biographical ones, and the work is stronger for it.

Plews' prose is concise but never clinical; on the contrary, it's often warm and shows great compassion or affection for the story's many characters, even hucksters like Elvis' manager Tom Parker. Plews doesn't seek to aggrandize, but merely to humanize and in doing so restores some sense of why what archetypal figures like Hank Williams or Elvis Presley were doing was all that remarkable to begin with.

COUNTRY MUSIC:
My favorite pieces of Walk A Lonely Street are the chapter titles. Broken up into several hundred separate entries, often only one or two pages at a time, each chapter highlights a relevant character or scene in broadly chronological order. Immaculately researched, Plews finds and highlights connections and coincidences throughout the history of popular and country music in the early-to-mid-20th century that seem so narratively convenient one would be forgiven for initially believing they couldn't possibly be true, but upon further investigation, are in fact very real. Plews plays with expectations, uses foreshadowing brilliantly, and has made Walk A Lonely Street the first book relating to Elvis Presley that I've read in over a decade offering genuine surprises and revelations.

Those who have been long-time Presley fans and have dove into the history of the era will be deeply rewarded comparable to the way comic book movie fans are served up Easter Eggs within a cinematic universe.

As an example of my favorite: one entry is titled "Hank Snow's first American recordings." Set in 1949, the title is a literal descriptor as the chapter describes Snow, a Canadian country musician who later inspired Elvis, making his first recordings in the United States, including a song entitled "I'm Movin' On," in a session produced by RCA Victor artist & repertoire man Steve Sholes - who served in the same capacity for Presley in the 1950s. But near the end of the book, in a scene set in 1969, we read a chapter titled "Elvis Presley's first American recordings." The title takes on a different meaning as Elvis arrives at Memphis-based American Sound Studios to lay down famous songs like "Suspicious Minds," and as an aside, Plews shrewdly mentions that Elvis also "taped a song from Hank Snow" there. Elvis fans reading this review are already with me - although unspoken, we know it is the same "I'm Movin' On."

Walk A Lonely Street is full to the brim with such knowing winks and nods, all expertly alluded to without losing sight of the story at hand.

THE TRUE STORY OF HEARTBREAK HOTEL:
Because of the nature of the book, its setting, and its subject, attention is inevitably placed more heavily on the predominantly white and male history-makers, but where relevant, Plews does bring into the story people of color whose lives and contributions have too often been overlooked by comparison, such as Lesley Riddle, Johnny Bragg, Arthur Crudup, The Platters, Ray Charles and Big Mama Thornton. I was pleased to see even my favorite deep-cut influence on Elvis, "rock and soul" ballad singer Roy Hamilton get spotlighted in the book.

"Heartbreak Hotel" co-writer Mae Boren Axton, as one of the central figures of the story, receives as thorough a biographical treatment as any of her male counterparts and hers is a remarkable story in and of itself, as a woman and mother fighting to succeed in an industry run by powerful and influential men. Plews not only explores the question that has been raised in some circles as to whether she was deserving of credit for writing the famous hit, but understands the cultural flaws inherent in the premise of the question, and draws a compelling conclusion from the more comprehensive perspective of her greater life story, though is always clear his interpretation is only one.

And finally, the remarkable tragedy behind the very real end of a human life that inspired "Heartbreak Hotel" is just as vital to the overall tale as Presley's or Boren Axton's. The story of Alvin Krolick, the troubled yet fascinating man who described himself as "a person who walks on a lonely street" looms darkly over the entire book, building to a breaking point. It is the one story told in Walk A Lonely Street that cannot be found recounted as thoroughly in any other other telling, and Plews brings the receipts: photos and historical documents finally put faces to the players. I hesitate to spoil anything further as it will likely be a revelation for most readers as it was for me, even more so than all the information about Presley and country music. I will say that the final, autobiographical entry in the book, from Plews' own perspective, is heart-breaking and poetic in its simplicity given the beast of a book that precedes it.

In short, Walk A Lonely Street: Elvis Presley, Country Music & The True Story of Heartbreak Hotel joins the ranks of Peter Guralnick's Last Train to Memphis and Careless Love, Ernst Jørgensen's A Life in Music and Alanna Nash's trio of Elvis-related books as one of the handful of truly essential reads on the subject, and should be on the shelf of any enthusiast of early country and rock music history as well.

I cannot recommend it highly enough.

********************
Review by Gordon Minto, October 2020, author of Elvis on Television 1956-1960 and writer for Elvis: The Man and His Music.

Walk A Lonely Street has all the hallmarks of a thriller: a complicated plotline, great characters, plus tantalising pieces of the jigsaw which leads up to the denouement of the tale and beyond. Recounted in a sprightly and often comic way, it holds the reader’s attention throughout and does what all good books should do: engage, entertain and illuminate.

The author’s writing style is vibrant, highly literate, and compelling, drawing the reader into the complex narrative, but doing so in a most accessible way, judiciously employing literary devices such as repetition to underscore points and help signpost what is to follow. Coincidences and parallels abound in the careers of Eddy Arnold, Elvis Presley and countless others! People whose names previously have merely been just that – names – have been fleshed out and made real, and their roles put into context with reference to Elvis.

Although much of the material is historical – some it dating way back long before Elvis existed (the first story begins in 1865) – it is extremely well researched (using source material from eminent and highly respected writers) and beautifully written in a rather droll and ironically amusing manner.

Presented as a series of short stories (many bearing pithy titles) - in which the writer seamlessly merges fact and ideas from his own imagination in a very credible way - clues are laid down for the reader to follow as all the bits in the jigsaw (involving a huge cast of players) begin to come together in a coherent and powerful way. Crucially, you get the feeling that you are there – and so can visualise the action in an almost cinematic way - as he unravels the stories and, of course, it makes you want to read on – as you would with a gripping novel.

Fascinating stuff!
Congratulations! I am convinced it will be a pleasure to read.
Feel somewhat like a fool...I actually believed your name was George Smith.



AndrewJ
Posts: 1228
Registered for: 19 years 7 months
Location: Sheffield, UK
Has thanked: 104 times
Been thanked: 274 times

Re: Walk A Lonely Street

Post by AndrewJ »

Congratulations George/Tony - it's a great feeling when you press publish. I am looking forward to reading your book - your ten years of work will make a lot of people happy!



Scarre
Posts: 5050
Registered for: 19 years 7 months
Been thanked: 1293 times

Re: Walk A Lonely Street

Post by Scarre »

Greystoke wrote:
Sun Dec 13, 2020 6:34 pm
Scarre wrote:
Sun Dec 13, 2020 6:26 pm
George Smith wrote:
Sun Dec 13, 2020 1:09 pm
Dear friends and fellow fans,

All things being well, tonight I will press the PUBLISH button on the book that has taken me almost ten years to research and write. Assuming all goes smoothly with the Amazon administration process, the book should available as a paperback before the end of the week.

Many of you have journeyed with me on this epic undertaking, offering advice, photographs, revelations, support and good criticism, and I find myself unable to adequately express my gratitude. This book would have been impossible to complete without the good people on this forum, so I hope you will accept my simple but heartfelt Thank You in this post.

I've read and re-read the proofs dozens of times and, doubtless, there will still be errors or sections that could have been written in a clearer or better fashion but, to quote from Scorsese's recent gem, "It is what it is", and it's time for me to abandon the re-writes and print.

Below you will find the details of the publication and I'll add a link once the page itself is up and running. I have also sent out a number of early-copies to movers and shakers within the Elvis world and I include the encouraging reviews that I have so far received.

Thank you, once again, for your support and patience!

************************

Walk A Lonely Street: Elvis Presley, Country Music & The True Story of Heartbreak Hotel is a unique volume that tells the tale of Elvis Presley’s rise to fame as viewed through the lens of his era-defining first hit record, “Heartbreak Hotel”. Presented as a series of consecutive short stories, it offers a new perspective on Presley’s musical and cultural achievements, and reveals the true and dramatic saga behind the breakthrough song that launched his career and changed the world.

WALK A LONELY STREET: Elvis Presley, Country Music & The True Story of Heartbreak Hotel by Tony Plews
• Published week beginning 14th December 2020 via Amazon
• £17.99 + postage
• The in-depth story of Elvis Presley’s rise to fame, as viewed through the lens of “Heartbreak Hotel”
• An Elvis Presley book like no other
• Almost a decade of research, writing and revisions
• 200,000 words, 700 pages and 563 tales to be told
• 33 photographs, documents and articles, most previously unpublished or unseen since the 1950s
• A chapter devoted to every Presley recording session 1953-1956
• Made with the assistance of the families and estates of Tommy Durden, Mae Boren Axton, Agnes Sampson and Delta Pinney, including the only living witness to the event that inspired the songwriters

********************
Review by Justin Gausman, December 2020, host of TCBCast: An Unofficial Elvis Presley Fan Podcast and director of Never Been to Graceland.

To refer to Walk A Lonely Street as merely a book about Elvis Presley would be a great disservice to what Tony Plews has crafted. It is a sweeping historical rock-and-roll epic, a true story as eminently digestible and cleverly written as a mystery thriller. The subtitle Elvis Presley, Country Music & The True Story of Heartbreak Hotel is just as important to understanding the wide canvas across time and distance that Plews uses to paint his picture.

ELVIS PRESLEY:
Without question, Walk A Lonely Street is one of the most essential books ever written regarding Elvis Presley, right alongside Peter Guralnick's famous two-part biography. But those looking for a straightforward biography will not find it here. Where Guralnick wrote a definitive recounting of the events of Elvis Presley's life, Plews has written perhaps the definitive book on understanding Elvis Presley's career as an artist. Plews is clear very early on that he will be using literary techniques rather than biographical ones, and the work is stronger for it.

Plews' prose is concise but never clinical; on the contrary, it's often warm and shows great compassion or affection for the story's many characters, even hucksters like Elvis' manager Tom Parker. Plews doesn't seek to aggrandize, but merely to humanize and in doing so restores some sense of why what archetypal figures like Hank Williams or Elvis Presley were doing was all that remarkable to begin with.

COUNTRY MUSIC:
My favorite pieces of Walk A Lonely Street are the chapter titles. Broken up into several hundred separate entries, often only one or two pages at a time, each chapter highlights a relevant character or scene in broadly chronological order. Immaculately researched, Plews finds and highlights connections and coincidences throughout the history of popular and country music in the early-to-mid-20th century that seem so narratively convenient one would be forgiven for initially believing they couldn't possibly be true, but upon further investigation, are in fact very real. Plews plays with expectations, uses foreshadowing brilliantly, and has made Walk A Lonely Street the first book relating to Elvis Presley that I've read in over a decade offering genuine surprises and revelations.

Those who have been long-time Presley fans and have dove into the history of the era will be deeply rewarded comparable to the way comic book movie fans are served up Easter Eggs within a cinematic universe.

As an example of my favorite: one entry is titled "Hank Snow's first American recordings." Set in 1949, the title is a literal descriptor as the chapter describes Snow, a Canadian country musician who later inspired Elvis, making his first recordings in the United States, including a song entitled "I'm Movin' On," in a session produced by RCA Victor artist & repertoire man Steve Sholes - who served in the same capacity for Presley in the 1950s. But near the end of the book, in a scene set in 1969, we read a chapter titled "Elvis Presley's first American recordings." The title takes on a different meaning as Elvis arrives at Memphis-based American Sound Studios to lay down famous songs like "Suspicious Minds," and as an aside, Plews shrewdly mentions that Elvis also "taped a song from Hank Snow" there. Elvis fans reading this review are already with me - although unspoken, we know it is the same "I'm Movin' On."

Walk A Lonely Street is full to the brim with such knowing winks and nods, all expertly alluded to without losing sight of the story at hand.

THE TRUE STORY OF HEARTBREAK HOTEL:
Because of the nature of the book, its setting, and its subject, attention is inevitably placed more heavily on the predominantly white and male history-makers, but where relevant, Plews does bring into the story people of color whose lives and contributions have too often been overlooked by comparison, such as Lesley Riddle, Johnny Bragg, Arthur Crudup, The Platters, Ray Charles and Big Mama Thornton. I was pleased to see even my favorite deep-cut influence on Elvis, "rock and soul" ballad singer Roy Hamilton get spotlighted in the book.

"Heartbreak Hotel" co-writer Mae Boren Axton, as one of the central figures of the story, receives as thorough a biographical treatment as any of her male counterparts and hers is a remarkable story in and of itself, as a woman and mother fighting to succeed in an industry run by powerful and influential men. Plews not only explores the question that has been raised in some circles as to whether she was deserving of credit for writing the famous hit, but understands the cultural flaws inherent in the premise of the question, and draws a compelling conclusion from the more comprehensive perspective of her greater life story, though is always clear his interpretation is only one.

And finally, the remarkable tragedy behind the very real end of a human life that inspired "Heartbreak Hotel" is just as vital to the overall tale as Presley's or Boren Axton's. The story of Alvin Krolick, the troubled yet fascinating man who described himself as "a person who walks on a lonely street" looms darkly over the entire book, building to a breaking point. It is the one story told in Walk A Lonely Street that cannot be found recounted as thoroughly in any other other telling, and Plews brings the receipts: photos and historical documents finally put faces to the players. I hesitate to spoil anything further as it will likely be a revelation for most readers as it was for me, even more so than all the information about Presley and country music. I will say that the final, autobiographical entry in the book, from Plews' own perspective, is heart-breaking and poetic in its simplicity given the beast of a book that precedes it.

In short, Walk A Lonely Street: Elvis Presley, Country Music & The True Story of Heartbreak Hotel joins the ranks of Peter Guralnick's Last Train to Memphis and Careless Love, Ernst Jørgensen's A Life in Music and Alanna Nash's trio of Elvis-related books as one of the handful of truly essential reads on the subject, and should be on the shelf of any enthusiast of early country and rock music history as well.

I cannot recommend it highly enough.

********************
Review by Gordon Minto, October 2020, author of Elvis on Television 1956-1960 and writer for Elvis: The Man and His Music.

Walk A Lonely Street has all the hallmarks of a thriller: a complicated plotline, great characters, plus tantalising pieces of the jigsaw which leads up to the denouement of the tale and beyond. Recounted in a sprightly and often comic way, it holds the reader’s attention throughout and does what all good books should do: engage, entertain and illuminate.

The author’s writing style is vibrant, highly literate, and compelling, drawing the reader into the complex narrative, but doing so in a most accessible way, judiciously employing literary devices such as repetition to underscore points and help signpost what is to follow. Coincidences and parallels abound in the careers of Eddy Arnold, Elvis Presley and countless others! People whose names previously have merely been just that – names – have been fleshed out and made real, and their roles put into context with reference to Elvis.

Although much of the material is historical – some it dating way back long before Elvis existed (the first story begins in 1865) – it is extremely well researched (using source material from eminent and highly respected writers) and beautifully written in a rather droll and ironically amusing manner.

Presented as a series of short stories (many bearing pithy titles) - in which the writer seamlessly merges fact and ideas from his own imagination in a very credible way - clues are laid down for the reader to follow as all the bits in the jigsaw (involving a huge cast of players) begin to come together in a coherent and powerful way. Crucially, you get the feeling that you are there – and so can visualise the action in an almost cinematic way - as he unravels the stories and, of course, it makes you want to read on – as you would with a gripping novel.

Fascinating stuff!
Congratulations! I am convinced it will be a pleasure to read.
Feel somewhat like a fool...I actually believed your name was George Smith.
Did he tell you about the party the fellas were having?! Gets them every time.

No. Please, tell me.


User avatar

JimmyCool
Posts: 5390
Registered for: 14 years 11 months
Location: Viña del Mar, Chile
Mood:
Has thanked: 1002 times
Been thanked: 1553 times

Re: Walk A Lonely Street

Post by JimmyCool »

Can't wait to read it!


Note: This post is for readers of the FECC forum only. Permission to copy this post elsewhere is not granted.

Scarre
Posts: 5050
Registered for: 19 years 7 months
Been thanked: 1293 times

Re: Walk A Lonely Street

Post by Scarre »

Greystoke wrote:
Sun Dec 13, 2020 6:34 pm
Scarre wrote:
Sun Dec 13, 2020 6:26 pm
George Smith wrote:
Sun Dec 13, 2020 1:09 pm
Dear friends and fellow fans,

All things being well, tonight I will press the PUBLISH button on the book that has taken me almost ten years to research and write. Assuming all goes smoothly with the Amazon administration process, the book should available as a paperback before the end of the week.

Many of you have journeyed with me on this epic undertaking, offering advice, photographs, revelations, support and good criticism, and I find myself unable to adequately express my gratitude. This book would have been impossible to complete without the good people on this forum, so I hope you will accept my simple but heartfelt Thank You in this post.

I've read and re-read the proofs dozens of times and, doubtless, there will still be errors or sections that could have been written in a clearer or better fashion but, to quote from Scorsese's recent gem, "It is what it is", and it's time for me to abandon the re-writes and print.

Below you will find the details of the publication and I'll add a link once the page itself is up and running. I have also sent out a number of early-copies to movers and shakers within the Elvis world and I include the encouraging reviews that I have so far received.

Thank you, once again, for your support and patience!

************************

Walk A Lonely Street: Elvis Presley, Country Music & The True Story of Heartbreak Hotel is a unique volume that tells the tale of Elvis Presley’s rise to fame as viewed through the lens of his era-defining first hit record, “Heartbreak Hotel”. Presented as a series of consecutive short stories, it offers a new perspective on Presley’s musical and cultural achievements, and reveals the true and dramatic saga behind the breakthrough song that launched his career and changed the world.

WALK A LONELY STREET: Elvis Presley, Country Music & The True Story of Heartbreak Hotel by Tony Plews
• Published week beginning 14th December 2020 via Amazon
• £17.99 + postage
• The in-depth story of Elvis Presley’s rise to fame, as viewed through the lens of “Heartbreak Hotel”
• An Elvis Presley book like no other
• Almost a decade of research, writing and revisions
• 200,000 words, 700 pages and 563 tales to be told
• 33 photographs, documents and articles, most previously unpublished or unseen since the 1950s
• A chapter devoted to every Presley recording session 1953-1956
• Made with the assistance of the families and estates of Tommy Durden, Mae Boren Axton, Agnes Sampson and Delta Pinney, including the only living witness to the event that inspired the songwriters

********************
Review by Justin Gausman, December 2020, host of TCBCast: An Unofficial Elvis Presley Fan Podcast and director of Never Been to Graceland.

To refer to Walk A Lonely Street as merely a book about Elvis Presley would be a great disservice to what Tony Plews has crafted. It is a sweeping historical rock-and-roll epic, a true story as eminently digestible and cleverly written as a mystery thriller. The subtitle Elvis Presley, Country Music & The True Story of Heartbreak Hotel is just as important to understanding the wide canvas across time and distance that Plews uses to paint his picture.

ELVIS PRESLEY:
Without question, Walk A Lonely Street is one of the most essential books ever written regarding Elvis Presley, right alongside Peter Guralnick's famous two-part biography. But those looking for a straightforward biography will not find it here. Where Guralnick wrote a definitive recounting of the events of Elvis Presley's life, Plews has written perhaps the definitive book on understanding Elvis Presley's career as an artist. Plews is clear very early on that he will be using literary techniques rather than biographical ones, and the work is stronger for it.

Plews' prose is concise but never clinical; on the contrary, it's often warm and shows great compassion or affection for the story's many characters, even hucksters like Elvis' manager Tom Parker. Plews doesn't seek to aggrandize, but merely to humanize and in doing so restores some sense of why what archetypal figures like Hank Williams or Elvis Presley were doing was all that remarkable to begin with.

COUNTRY MUSIC:
My favorite pieces of Walk A Lonely Street are the chapter titles. Broken up into several hundred separate entries, often only one or two pages at a time, each chapter highlights a relevant character or scene in broadly chronological order. Immaculately researched, Plews finds and highlights connections and coincidences throughout the history of popular and country music in the early-to-mid-20th century that seem so narratively convenient one would be forgiven for initially believing they couldn't possibly be true, but upon further investigation, are in fact very real. Plews plays with expectations, uses foreshadowing brilliantly, and has made Walk A Lonely Street the first book relating to Elvis Presley that I've read in over a decade offering genuine surprises and revelations.

Those who have been long-time Presley fans and have dove into the history of the era will be deeply rewarded comparable to the way comic book movie fans are served up Easter Eggs within a cinematic universe.

As an example of my favorite: one entry is titled "Hank Snow's first American recordings." Set in 1949, the title is a literal descriptor as the chapter describes Snow, a Canadian country musician who later inspired Elvis, making his first recordings in the United States, including a song entitled "I'm Movin' On," in a session produced by RCA Victor artist & repertoire man Steve Sholes - who served in the same capacity for Presley in the 1950s. But near the end of the book, in a scene set in 1969, we read a chapter titled "Elvis Presley's first American recordings." The title takes on a different meaning as Elvis arrives at Memphis-based American Sound Studios to lay down famous songs like "Suspicious Minds," and as an aside, Plews shrewdly mentions that Elvis also "taped a song from Hank Snow" there. Elvis fans reading this review are already with me - although unspoken, we know it is the same "I'm Movin' On."

Walk A Lonely Street is full to the brim with such knowing winks and nods, all expertly alluded to without losing sight of the story at hand.

THE TRUE STORY OF HEARTBREAK HOTEL:
Because of the nature of the book, its setting, and its subject, attention is inevitably placed more heavily on the predominantly white and male history-makers, but where relevant, Plews does bring into the story people of color whose lives and contributions have too often been overlooked by comparison, such as Lesley Riddle, Johnny Bragg, Arthur Crudup, The Platters, Ray Charles and Big Mama Thornton. I was pleased to see even my favorite deep-cut influence on Elvis, "rock and soul" ballad singer Roy Hamilton get spotlighted in the book.

"Heartbreak Hotel" co-writer Mae Boren Axton, as one of the central figures of the story, receives as thorough a biographical treatment as any of her male counterparts and hers is a remarkable story in and of itself, as a woman and mother fighting to succeed in an industry run by powerful and influential men. Plews not only explores the question that has been raised in some circles as to whether she was deserving of credit for writing the famous hit, but understands the cultural flaws inherent in the premise of the question, and draws a compelling conclusion from the more comprehensive perspective of her greater life story, though is always clear his interpretation is only one.

And finally, the remarkable tragedy behind the very real end of a human life that inspired "Heartbreak Hotel" is just as vital to the overall tale as Presley's or Boren Axton's. The story of Alvin Krolick, the troubled yet fascinating man who described himself as "a person who walks on a lonely street" looms darkly over the entire book, building to a breaking point. It is the one story told in Walk A Lonely Street that cannot be found recounted as thoroughly in any other other telling, and Plews brings the receipts: photos and historical documents finally put faces to the players. I hesitate to spoil anything further as it will likely be a revelation for most readers as it was for me, even more so than all the information about Presley and country music. I will say that the final, autobiographical entry in the book, from Plews' own perspective, is heart-breaking and poetic in its simplicity given the beast of a book that precedes it.

In short, Walk A Lonely Street: Elvis Presley, Country Music & The True Story of Heartbreak Hotel joins the ranks of Peter Guralnick's Last Train to Memphis and Careless Love, Ernst Jørgensen's A Life in Music and Alanna Nash's trio of Elvis-related books as one of the handful of truly essential reads on the subject, and should be on the shelf of any enthusiast of early country and rock music history as well.

I cannot recommend it highly enough.

********************
Review by Gordon Minto, October 2020, author of Elvis on Television 1956-1960 and writer for Elvis: The Man and His Music.

Walk A Lonely Street has all the hallmarks of a thriller: a complicated plotline, great characters, plus tantalising pieces of the jigsaw which leads up to the denouement of the tale and beyond. Recounted in a sprightly and often comic way, it holds the reader’s attention throughout and does what all good books should do: engage, entertain and illuminate.

The author’s writing style is vibrant, highly literate, and compelling, drawing the reader into the complex narrative, but doing so in a most accessible way, judiciously employing literary devices such as repetition to underscore points and help signpost what is to follow. Coincidences and parallels abound in the careers of Eddy Arnold, Elvis Presley and countless others! People whose names previously have merely been just that – names – have been fleshed out and made real, and their roles put into context with reference to Elvis.

Although much of the material is historical – some it dating way back long before Elvis existed (the first story begins in 1865) – it is extremely well researched (using source material from eminent and highly respected writers) and beautifully written in a rather droll and ironically amusing manner.

Presented as a series of short stories (many bearing pithy titles) - in which the writer seamlessly merges fact and ideas from his own imagination in a very credible way - clues are laid down for the reader to follow as all the bits in the jigsaw (involving a huge cast of players) begin to come together in a coherent and powerful way. Crucially, you get the feeling that you are there – and so can visualise the action in an almost cinematic way - as he unravels the stories and, of course, it makes you want to read on – as you would with a gripping novel.

Fascinating stuff!
Congratulations! I am convinced it will be a pleasure to read.
Feel somewhat like a fool...I actually believed your name was George Smith.
Did he tell you about the party the fellas were having?! Gets them every time.
Sorry, didn't mean to put you in a uncomfortable place.



Ryan73
Posts: 1403
Registered for: 11 years 10 months
Has thanked: 1543 times
Been thanked: 608 times

Re: Walk A Lonely Street

Post by Ryan73 »

Congratulations on this achievement. I can hardly wait to receive a copy and dig in. I never tire of reading the mysteries surrounding those early formative years of Elvis' career.



myalfie
Posts: 158
Registered for: 12 years
Mood:
Has thanked: 69 times
Been thanked: 50 times
Age: 56

Re: Walk A Lonely Street

Post by myalfie »

Can’t wait to order my copy of this fascinating book.


User avatar

jon_burrows
Posts: 1170
Registered for: 14 years 11 months
Location: South Shields
Has thanked: 81 times
Been thanked: 133 times
Age: 55

Re: Walk A Lonely Street

Post by jon_burrows »

Congratulations and well done, George. I hope you're filled with pride when you press that button. Looking forward to getting my copy.


User avatar

mike edwards66
Posts: 5679
Registered for: 10 years 7 months
Been thanked: 1543 times

Re: Walk A Lonely Street

Post by mike edwards66 »

Good news! I'm looking forward to every page.

Almost 10 years! You won't know what to do with yourself now.

What happened to the cover shot, I thought that was set in stone?


>>>


some people say i done all right for a girl . . . oh yeah yeah
User avatar

drjohncarpenter
Posts: 103361
Registered for: 19 years 7 months
Location: United States of America
Has thanked: 10907 times
Been thanked: 29171 times
Age: 87

Re: Walk A Lonely Street

Post by drjohncarpenter »

Every good member of this forum should do themselves a favor and purchase a copy of this new book.

The story is fascinating, fresh and will be told with a eye towards history and the utmost grace and clarity.

Tony's GREAAAAT!


Image




George Smith wrote:
Sun Dec 13, 2020 1:09 pm
Dear friends and fellow fans,

All things being well, tonight I will press the PUBLISH button on the book that has taken me almost ten years to research and write. Assuming all goes smoothly with the Amazon administration process, the book should available as a paperback before the end of the week.

Many of you have journeyed with me on this epic undertaking, offering advice, photographs, revelations, support and good criticism, and I find myself unable to adequately express my gratitude. This book would have been impossible to complete without the good people on this forum, so I hope you will accept my simple but heartfelt Thank You in this post.

I've read and re-read the proofs dozens of times and, doubtless, there will still be errors or sections that could have been written in a clearer or better fashion but, to quote from Scorsese's recent gem, "It is what it is", and it's time for me to abandon the re-writes and print.

Below you will find the details of the publication and I'll add a link once the page itself is up and running. I have also sent out a number of early-copies to movers and shakers within the Elvis world and I include the encouraging reviews that I have so far received.

Thank you, once again, for your support and patience!

************************

Walk A Lonely Street: Elvis Presley, Country Music & The True Story of Heartbreak Hotel is a unique volume that tells the tale of Elvis Presley’s rise to fame as viewed through the lens of his era-defining first hit record, “Heartbreak Hotel”. Presented as a series of consecutive short stories, it offers a new perspective on Presley’s musical and cultural achievements, and reveals the true and dramatic saga behind the breakthrough song that launched his career and changed the world.

WALK A LONELY STREET: Elvis Presley, Country Music & The True Story of Heartbreak Hotel by Tony Plews
• Published week beginning 14th December 2020 via Amazon
• £17.99 + postage
• The in-depth story of Elvis Presley’s rise to fame, as viewed through the lens of “Heartbreak Hotel”
• An Elvis Presley book like no other
• Almost a decade of research, writing and revisions
• 200,000 words, 700 pages and 563 tales to be told
• 33 photographs, documents and articles, most previously unpublished or unseen since the 1950s
• A chapter devoted to every Presley recording session 1953-1956
• Made with the assistance of the families and estates of Tommy Durden, Mae Boren Axton, Agnes Sampson and Delta Pinney, including the only living witness to the event that inspired the songwriters

********************
Review by Justin Gausman, December 2020, host of TCBCast: An Unofficial Elvis Presley Fan Podcast and director of Never Been to Graceland.

To refer to Walk A Lonely Street as merely a book about Elvis Presley would be a great disservice to what Tony Plews has crafted. It is a sweeping historical rock-and-roll epic, a true story as eminently digestible and cleverly written as a mystery thriller. The subtitle Elvis Presley, Country Music & The True Story of Heartbreak Hotel is just as important to understanding the wide canvas across time and distance that Plews uses to paint his picture.

ELVIS PRESLEY:
Without question, Walk A Lonely Street is one of the most essential books ever written regarding Elvis Presley, right alongside Peter Guralnick's famous two-part biography. But those looking for a straightforward biography will not find it here. Where Guralnick wrote a definitive recounting of the events of Elvis Presley's life, Plews has written perhaps the definitive book on understanding Elvis Presley's career as an artist. Plews is clear very early on that he will be using literary techniques rather than biographical ones, and the work is stronger for it.

Plews' prose is concise but never clinical; on the contrary, it's often warm and shows great compassion or affection for the story's many characters, even hucksters like Elvis' manager Tom Parker. Plews doesn't seek to aggrandize, but merely to humanize and in doing so restores some sense of why what archetypal figures like Hank Williams or Elvis Presley were doing was all that remarkable to begin with.

COUNTRY MUSIC:
My favorite pieces of Walk A Lonely Street are the chapter titles. Broken up into several hundred separate entries, often only one or two pages at a time, each chapter highlights a relevant character or scene in broadly chronological order. Immaculately researched, Plews finds and highlights connections and coincidences throughout the history of popular and country music in the early-to-mid-20th century that seem so narratively convenient one would be forgiven for initially believing they couldn't possibly be true, but upon further investigation, are in fact very real. Plews plays with expectations, uses foreshadowing brilliantly, and has made Walk A Lonely Street the first book relating to Elvis Presley that I've read in over a decade offering genuine surprises and revelations.

Those who have been long-time Presley fans and have dove into the history of the era will be deeply rewarded comparable to the way comic book movie fans are served up Easter Eggs within a cinematic universe.

As an example of my favorite: one entry is titled "Hank Snow's first American recordings." Set in 1949, the title is a literal descriptor as the chapter describes Snow, a Canadian country musician who later inspired Elvis, making his first recordings in the United States, including a song entitled "I'm Movin' On," in a session produced by RCA Victor artist & repertoire man Steve Sholes - who served in the same capacity for Presley in the 1950s. But near the end of the book, in a scene set in 1969, we read a chapter titled "Elvis Presley's first American recordings." The title takes on a different meaning as Elvis arrives at Memphis-based American Sound Studios to lay down famous songs like "Suspicious Minds," and as an aside, Plews shrewdly mentions that Elvis also "taped a song from Hank Snow" there. Elvis fans reading this review are already with me - although unspoken, we know it is the same "I'm Movin' On."

Walk A Lonely Street is full to the brim with such knowing winks and nods, all expertly alluded to without losing sight of the story at hand.

THE TRUE STORY OF HEARTBREAK HOTEL:
Because of the nature of the book, its setting, and its subject, attention is inevitably placed more heavily on the predominantly white and male history-makers, but where relevant, Plews does bring into the story people of color whose lives and contributions have too often been overlooked by comparison, such as Lesley Riddle, Johnny Bragg, Arthur Crudup, The Platters, Ray Charles and Big Mama Thornton. I was pleased to see even my favorite deep-cut influence on Elvis, "rock and soul" ballad singer Roy Hamilton get spotlighted in the book.

"Heartbreak Hotel" co-writer Mae Boren Axton, as one of the central figures of the story, receives as thorough a biographical treatment as any of her male counterparts and hers is a remarkable story in and of itself, as a woman and mother fighting to succeed in an industry run by powerful and influential men. Plews not only explores the question that has been raised in some circles as to whether she was deserving of credit for writing the famous hit, but understands the cultural flaws inherent in the premise of the question, and draws a compelling conclusion from the more comprehensive perspective of her greater life story, though is always clear his interpretation is only one.

And finally, the remarkable tragedy behind the very real end of a human life that inspired "Heartbreak Hotel" is just as vital to the overall tale as Presley's or Boren Axton's. The story of Alvin Krolick, the troubled yet fascinating man who described himself as "a person who walks on a lonely street" looms darkly over the entire book, building to a breaking point. It is the one story told in Walk A Lonely Street that cannot be found recounted as thoroughly in any other other telling, and Plews brings the receipts: photos and historical documents finally put faces to the players. I hesitate to spoil anything further as it will likely be a revelation for most readers as it was for me, even more so than all the information about Presley and country music. I will say that the final, autobiographical entry in the book, from Plews' own perspective, is heart-breaking and poetic in its simplicity given the beast of a book that precedes it.

In short, Walk A Lonely Street: Elvis Presley, Country Music & The True Story of Heartbreak Hotel joins the ranks of Peter Guralnick's Last Train to Memphis and Careless Love, Ernst Jørgensen's A Life in Music and Alanna Nash's trio of Elvis-related books as one of the handful of truly essential reads on the subject, and should be on the shelf of any enthusiast of early country and rock music history as well.

I cannot recommend it highly enough.

********************
Review by Gordon Minto, October 2020, author of Elvis on Television 1956-1960 and writer for Elvis: The Man and His Music.

Walk A Lonely Street has all the hallmarks of a thriller: a complicated plotline, great characters, plus tantalising pieces of the jigsaw which leads up to the denouement of the tale and beyond. Recounted in a sprightly and often comic way, it holds the reader’s attention throughout and does what all good books should do: engage, entertain and illuminate.

The author’s writing style is vibrant, highly literate, and compelling, drawing the reader into the complex narrative, but doing so in a most accessible way, judiciously employing literary devices such as repetition to underscore points and help signpost what is to follow. Coincidences and parallels abound in the careers of Eddy Arnold, Elvis Presley and countless others! People whose names previously have merely been just that – names – have been fleshed out and made real, and their roles put into context with reference to Elvis.

Although much of the material is historical – some it dating way back long before Elvis existed (the first story begins in 1865) – it is extremely well researched (using source material from eminent and highly respected writers) and beautifully written in a rather droll and ironically amusing manner.

Presented as a series of short stories (many bearing pithy titles) - in which the writer seamlessly merges fact and ideas from his own imagination in a very credible way - clues are laid down for the reader to follow as all the bits in the jigsaw (involving a huge cast of players) begin to come together in a coherent and powerful way. Crucially, you get the feeling that you are there – and so can visualise the action in an almost cinematic way - as he unravels the stories and, of course, it makes you want to read on – as you would with a gripping novel.

Fascinating stuff!


.
Dr. John Carpenter, M.D.
Stop, look and listen, baby <<--->> that's my philosophy!
User avatar

Steve Morse
Posts: 3831
Registered for: 19 years 5 months
Location: Staffordshire
Has thanked: 1643 times
Been thanked: 1935 times
Age: 74

Re: Walk A Lonely Street

Post by Steve Morse »

I'm looking forward to reading the real names of the bellhop and the desk clerk. They deserve their moment of fame after all these years.


"Won't you sing me away to a summer night - let me hold her in my arms again"
User avatar

Topic author
George Smith
Posts: 3598
Registered for: 15 years 5 months
Location: Down at the end of Lonely Street
Been thanked: 2025 times

Re: Walk A Lonely Street

Post by George Smith »

mike edwards66 wrote:
Sun Dec 13, 2020 10:39 pm
Good news! I'm looking forward to every page.

Almost 10 years! You won't know what to do with yourself now.

What happened to the cover shot, I thought that was set in stone?
Cover shot set in stone but Getty required more gold, sadly.



WALK A LONELY STREET
Elvis Presley, Country Music &
The True Story of Heartbreak Hotel

Now available from Amazon

http://www.GeorgeSmithPublications.com
https://www.facebook.com/WalkALonelyStreet/
User avatar

Topic author
George Smith
Posts: 3598
Registered for: 15 years 5 months
Location: Down at the end of Lonely Street
Been thanked: 2025 times

Re: Walk A Lonely Street

Post by George Smith »

Thank you for all of your kind comments, they are very much appreciated.

I received further feedback from an advance reader last night:

*******************************

Review by Trevor O'Sullivan, December 2020, host of Elvis Presley: His Truth is Marching On Facebook group.

​As well as being a passionate fan of Elvis, I’ve found myself become, through my Facebook group chat, constantly debunking fake Elvis history. I am passionate about fans of the future being left a legacy of truth. The Elvis story doesn’t need embellishment as it’s a fascinating rags to riches tale. 

With so many books being written on Elvis it seems the well had run dry. That was until a writer by the name of Tony Plews took research and a search for facts and not myth to the utmost degree.

His book on the origins of "Heartbreak Hotel", Walk A Lonely Street,  is a revelatory tome on the history of Elvis and rock and roll music. It’s a tour de force bringing the reader back in time. He does this in a very clever way through short tales which all mesh together to reveal the bigger picture.

In a world where Elvis image often usurps his music and history this book is refreshing change of pace. History can sometimes be daunting to read, but I can assure you that this reads like a short sharp series of mystery and thrillers.

You’ll never listen to "Heartbreak Hotel" the same way again.



WALK A LONELY STREET
Elvis Presley, Country Music &
The True Story of Heartbreak Hotel

Now available from Amazon

http://www.GeorgeSmithPublications.com
https://www.facebook.com/WalkALonelyStreet/
User avatar

DayVee Bee
Posts: 283
Registered for: 9 years 10 months
Location: Sunshine Place
Has thanked: 2698 times
Been thanked: 135 times

Re: Walk A Lonely Street

Post by DayVee Bee »



"I'm too Crazy to be Serious!"
User avatar

Sebastian E
Posts: 506
Registered for: 15 years 2 months
Location: Germany
Has thanked: 909 times
Been thanked: 374 times

Re: Walk A Lonely Street

Post by Sebastian E »

Tony, will the book also be published as an ebook?


User avatar

Steve Morse
Posts: 3831
Registered for: 19 years 5 months
Location: Staffordshire
Has thanked: 1643 times
Been thanked: 1935 times
Age: 74

Re: Walk A Lonely Street

Post by Steve Morse »

Just ordered it !


"Won't you sing me away to a summer night - let me hold her in my arms again"
User avatar

pmp
Posts: 7008
Registered for: 3 years 6 months
Has thanked: 867 times
Been thanked: 5690 times

Re: Walk A Lonely Street

Post by pmp »

This looks great! Looking forward to reading it!


Accused of being "a nerd in his 20s." I wish.

Image
User avatar

Topic author
George Smith
Posts: 3598
Registered for: 15 years 5 months
Location: Down at the end of Lonely Street
Been thanked: 2025 times

Re: Walk A Lonely Street - now available in UK

Post by George Smith »

Boy, you guys are quick off the mark with the Amazon links, thank you.

The book is now available in the UK and I believe other territories will follow soon.

Thanks for the early purchases!!



WALK A LONELY STREET
Elvis Presley, Country Music &
The True Story of Heartbreak Hotel

Now available from Amazon

http://www.GeorgeSmithPublications.com
https://www.facebook.com/WalkALonelyStreet/
User avatar

MikeFromHolland
Posts: 7476
Registered for: 10 years 7 months
Has thanked: 2447 times
Been thanked: 6577 times

Re: Walk A Lonely Street - now available in UK

Post by MikeFromHolland »

.

I received the message from Amazon, after trying to order it, that it can’t be shipped to the Netherlands. Are more Dutch fans experiencing this?


Mike

------
lay back,
take it easy
And try a smile...

.
User avatar

chop983
Posts: 968
Registered for: 8 years 3 months
Location: England
Has thanked: 182 times
Been thanked: 313 times
Age: 50

Re: Walk A Lonely Street - now available in UK

Post by chop983 »

Ordered.