ROUSTABOUT (1964) - The Film

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ROUSTABOUT (1964) - The Film

Post by goldbelt »

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Roustabout (1964)

I recently revisited the movie Roustabout and found it still holds up very well as one of Elvis' better film musicals. Yes, it may venture into lightweight territory here and there, but at it's heart lies an enjoyable, entertaining and cohesive storyline. So much so, the screenplay received a nomination for a Writers Guild Of America award.

Elvis, looking more like he did in King Creole than at anytime since 1958 appears this time as the character Charlie Rogers, a roving singer who at times displays an arrogant attitude reminiscent of an earlier role as character Vince Everett.

Indeed, one early scene in which Elvis pulls leading lady Joan Freeman (Cathy) towards him is somewhat reminiscent of the 'that ain't tactics' scene with 1957 co-star Judy Tyler.

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Whilst the character of Charlie Rogers has an attitude that often gets him into trouble, getting into fights does not appear to be the motivation. Though, as he yells at Cathy's father Joe after being told he talks mighty big, "I can back it up too".

For example, in the lead up to the first fight scene of the movie, he walks away from a fist fight until confronted. He's challenged in the tea house and he walks outside, only to be followed, and then he still gets on his bike ready to ride off until challenged to get off it.

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On two further occasions he is hit by Joe first before retaliating - the second time he lets Joe hit him several times unchallenged. Even when ridiculed for not riding the wall of death and having already said he's a coward by way of explanation,he still walks away, not throwing a single punch. Instead defiantly getting on the bike and riding the wall of death after all.

As did Vince, so Charlie also finds redemption by the end of the movie - going from someone who is at times arrogant and selfish with an attitude that often gets him into trouble, to someone who finds love, a place to belong and someone who starts to consider other peoples needs as much as his own.

And as in King Creole, Elvis finds himself the prize in a battle between two rival enterprises, though the motivations and repercussions of that are less sinister in Roustabout.

Performances And Cinematography


Overall performances are very good, with Barbara Stanwyck giving a standout performance by being effortlessly convincing as Carnival owner Maggie Morgan. Although Elvis at times almost shouts his lines at the other actors, in this movie it seems in keeping with the character. He also displays some lighter touches in his acting and some good comedic timing.

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Location filming is very effective with the occasional movie back lot or rear projection scene a little distracting.

Good use is made of the widescreen cinematography which really comes into it's own with production numbers Little Egypt and Big Love, Big Heartache - the difference in staging demonstrating the huge scale of Harry Carver's rival carny in comparison to Maggie's far smaller business.

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Stunt work is top notch, the movie really sells that it's Elvis crashing through the fencing on his motorbike early in the film.

And it is the bike crash that is the pivotal moment of the film, one which leads Elvis to have to spend several days at the carnival while he waits for his bike to be repaired. A stay prolonged while parts are sourced for his Japanese Honda. It is this first encounter with Cathy, Joe and Maggie that sets everything in place for the rest of the story to unfold.

From the moment he's riding down the road singing Wheels On My Heels, through the initial interaction with Cathy, Joe and Maggie, to the bike crash and onto the journey to the carnival, this crucial scene is perfectly constructed. With just a few lines of dialogue, the audience already knows the characters and learns that Joe is a bad tempered drinker, and very protective of his daughter and that Maggie is the steadying influence within the dynamic.

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Production number It's A Wonderful World is somewhat inventively filmed, with both the cinematography at the beginning of the scene and the instrumentation to the song complimenting the gentle motion of the big wheel that Elvis and co-star Joan are on while he performs the song.

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Even action sequences such as where Elvis does eventually ride the carnival's 'wall of death' are well utilised, not only to depict Charlie Rogers' defiant arrogance when challenged, but as an opportunity to advance the movie's narrative by having a particular item, important to the plot, fall out of his pocket when he takes a spill from the bike while descending the wall.

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Songs And Soundtrack

Whilst 'It's Carnival Time' and 'Carny Town' are the weakest links on the Roustabout soundtrack album, when taken within the context the movie itself, much like It's A Wonderful World described above, they do very much suit the scenes they are used in. And so it's useful to take into account that such songs were recorded for use in particular scenes of the movie first and foremost, when assessing such soundtrack songs and their place in Elvis' recorded output.

Songs such as Wheels On My Heels are well used to advance the narrative, as is the main love song of the movie, Big Love, Big Heartache, which signals Cathy's (Joan Freeman) arrival at the rival Carny just in time to find him declaring his love for her in song.

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And, such situational songs were in good company in the charts at the time. The Roustabout LP topped the U.S. charts during the first week of 1965, and soundtracks for musicals Mary Poppins and The Sound Of Music also went on to take the top spot later the same year. Mary Poppins actually becoming the best performing album of 1965.

Roustabout Trivia

Other than Raquel Welch making her movie debut in Roustabout, and an appearance from Richard Keil (who went on to star as Jaws in two Bond movies) - Roustabout also features a number of people that have themselves appeared in other Elvis films. Including Sue Ann Langdon, Pat Buttram, Norman Grabowski, Billy Barty, Terri Garr, Marianna Hill, Red West and Lance LeGault.

Hey you, sideburns .... I fixed your bike.


Interesting to find Kenneth Becker ('hey you, sideburns' from Loving You) making his 4th appearance in an Elvis movie with Roustabout. This time as the guy who repairs and delivers Elvis' motorcycle back to him.
There is a moment where Elvis asks him about the extent of the damage his bike had sustained after crashing through the fence. Kenneth replies along the lines of 'nothing really, it just ran out of gas' , before going on to list the actual repairs. A fairly amusing moment - with maybe even an air of improvisation about that particular line.

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Elvis and Kenneth Becker in the classic Mean Woman Blues scene from the film Loving You (1957)


There could be an interesting topic to be found in just how many people appeared in more than one Elvis movie, with so many cropping up in Roustabout alone.
Last edited by goldbelt on Sat Aug 05, 2017 1:05 am, edited 1 time in total.


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Re: ROUSTABOUT (1964) - The Film

Post by goldbelt »

Roustabout On Set Photos

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Roustabout Movie Trailer

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Re: ROUSTABOUT (1964) - The Film

Post by TINML »

One of my favorite Elvis movies, top 5 for sure.

Great post!


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Re: ROUSTABOUT (1964) - The Film

Post by jetblack »

Fantastic posts Goldbelt.

I love how in this video Miss Stanwyck seeming a bit nervous runs her hand up and down the inside of Elvis' jacket. A very nice moment.

..

Andy


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Re: ROUSTABOUT (1964) - The Film

Post by MikeFromHolland »

goldbelt wrote:Roustabout On Set Photos

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Roustabout Movie Trailer

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Cool!!!!! Thanks for the share and the wonderful OP!



Fyi: many more Roustabout on-set pics are to be found in this thread:

An awful lot of rarely seen B&W's - movie related (on set)
https://www.elvis-collectors.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=8&t=88702#p1394902

.


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Re: ROUSTABOUT (1964) - The Film

Post by MikeFromHolland »

jetblack wrote:Fantastic posts Goldbelt.

I love how in this video Miss Stanwyck seeming a bit nervous runs her hand up and down the inside of Elvis' jacket. A very nice moment.

..

Andy

Neat observation :D :smt023
Schermafbeelding 2017-08-05 om 14.33.44.png
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Re: ROUSTABOUT (1964) - The Film

Post by Ciscoking »

What a fantastic posting....thank you....it..reminds me how nice this little movie musical is..excellent!!!


Thanks to Ernst Joergensen, Roger Semon and Erik Rasmussen for the great work. Keep the spirit alive !
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Re: ROUSTABOUT (1964) - The Film

Post by Ciscoking »

What a fantastic posting....thank you....it..reminds me how nice this little movie musical is..excellent!!!


Thanks to Ernst Joergensen, Roger Semon and Erik Rasmussen for the great work. Keep the spirit alive !
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Re: ROUSTABOUT (1964) - The Film

Post by MikeFromHolland »

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There's a Roustabout revival going on right here on FECC. I like that! :D

::rocks

With plaster:
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Plaster gone, but you still can see the wound:
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The jacket:
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Re: ROUSTABOUT (1964) - The Film

Post by Ciscoking »

No wonder it hit spot 1 in the charts...good movie...good Songs. .Just easy entertainment like it was common back then...


Thanks to Ernst Joergensen, Roger Semon and Erik Rasmussen for the great work. Keep the spirit alive !
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Re: ROUSTABOUT (1964) - The Film

Post by ORION »

Damn - looks like me and the Mrs. will have to skip Netflix tonight and watch Roustabout... Perhaps it'll be Roustabout and Chill... :lol:

Thanks guys!!!


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Re: ROUSTABOUT (1964) - The Film

Post by MikeFromHolland »

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Interview by Walter Rainbird on the set of Roustabout – from the WEEKEND magazine June 10, 1964:
You could mistake it for any small American town the morning after the night the circus arrived. Carnival booths, shooting galleries and popcorn stands face each other across a dusty road littered with empty paper bags. It looks seedy enough to be the real thing until you gaze down the road where bored property men are adding another house to the film set's mock town.

But there is no mistaking the young man slumped in a canvas chair, halfway down the road, staring aimlessly ahead.

He is wearing blue jeans, blue shirt, short blue jacket and black boots.
His face is made up in a light even tan and his hair has been dyed jet black.
The make-up people have done a good job on him, though they have done nothing about the rosebud mouth, strangely small and almost feminine.
Pop idols have come and gone over the past eight years but that mouth still has a hypnotic magic for millions of girls around the world.

So has the name.
Elvis Presley.

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He sits there bored, resigned to the film-making waiting game, while pretty starlets swivel by.
They are just about to shoot Roustabout, Presley's 16th film, for producer Hal Wallis who discovered him for the screen.

At that time, Hollywood dismissed Presley as a fluke. But the fluke minted enough money - a reputed £5,000,000 - to make them eat their words with their cocktail olives.

"Never", producer Hal Wallis (right) insisted, "not for one moment, have I thought of Elvis as a freak. I am reminded of this when I am asked why it is I have not gone after the Beatles the way I went after Elvis.

"My answer is that I have no use for them. I doubt that they can last more than a couple of pictures.
I don't want to be unkind and call them a flash-in-the-pan, but they are no match for Elvis, the unknown Elvis of 1956.

Not that I haven't had a good look at them. I have. And I found them wanting. They have no sound, no rhythm. I wouldn't touch them. It's as simple as that."

After talking to the star-maker, I moved over to the star. What did he think of the Beatles who deposed him from the Top Ten and the jukeboxes? There were many questions to put to him. Why for instance, had he never visited Britain, where a personal appearance might win back fans from the new boys?

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We talked...
I said: You haven't appeared in a live show at all in the past few years. Why are you hiding from the world?

Presley replied: "I haven't been hiding, There is no deliberate attempt to keep me out of the public eye.
I know people have said the Colonel (Colonel Tom Parker, the mastermind behind Presley's career) has some sort of strategy about my exposure to the public. It isn't that at all.

But we do have a programme which calls for three pictures in a year and that is a lot of pictures. It doesn't leave one with much time in between.

Q: You rest up? Even if you realise that your insistence on staying out of the public eye may cost you some of your popularity?  
 
Elvis: I wouldn't say that. But the Colonel says I cannot go to one country without offending people in another country, and I guess he is right. Somebody will always be unhappy.

But it's different with movies. They go everywhere. Yet, don't think I wouldn't love to go to England, for instance, and make a couple of appearances there.

I've been thinking of that for some time, and I'm as close to going as I was a couple of years ago.

Q: You make it all sound so difficult, but is it really? I’m sure the people in Germany, for instance, wouldn’t mind if this year you visit England only.

Elvis: This is not the way the Colonel sees it. And I trust the Colonel.

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Q: In the meantime, the Beatles have taken over. People have said that, in a sense, you, or the absence of you, are responsible for their emergence and their fabulous success.

Elvis: As for the Beatles, all I can say is so much more power to them. They’ve appeared on three Ed Sullivan shows in this country and I watched the all.

Q: What did you think of them?

Elvis: You can’t ask me to tell you what I really feel about them. I don’t think I should. I don’t think it would be fair to fellow entertainers.
Remember, I am a lucky guy myself. I’ve never forgotten that. It’s too vivid in my memory. I’ll say that the Beatles have got what it takes, and in great abundance that they have been given a heck of a vote of confidence. I’m sorry, but I have to be diplomatic.

Q: You don’t sound envious, but as you watch the teenage audiences scream, it must have brought back memories… Wasn’t it more or less the same to you?

Elvis: More or less. But let me add, I sure wish them luck.

Q: A lot of what you say implies that money is of no importance to you?

Elvis: I’m not implying anything. I am most grateful for my good fortune. But I am a man of simple tastes. I don’t need the money for myself. For a while, I was like a kid with a new toy, but it was never my goal and never will be.

Money can never buy everything your heart desires. It won't buy love, or health or true happiness. And even sometimes when you give it away, you don't get the thanks you're entitled to.

Presley, the ex-truck driver from Mississippi, is now the master of a mansion outside Memphis, Tennessee, which he calls home, and a villa outside Hollywood he regards as his working quarters.
Once a film is finished, he drives 2,000 miles back to Memphis with the private army he calls "my guys" (cousin Billy Smith, aide Joe Esposito, transport boss Allan Fortas, pals Jim Kingsley and Richard Davis)

Elvis is at the wheel every inch of the way, "These are the happiest days of my life," he said.

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This seemed an apt moment to ask about the other side of his life which has been kept so secret.
I said I hoped he would be as outspoken as he had earlier, Presley said he didn't as a rule discuss his private life.

I told him; "I see you as a red-blooded young man with normal instincts. I refuse to accept the theory that you spend your time with your guys or timidly taking girls out on dates that end with a shy kiss on the doorstep."

Presley replied, "I'll admit something to you. But without going into details. Let me say that I've led quite a fast life, really, and that I'm as red-blooded as the next guy.

The difference between me and the other guy is that I hate to publicise it. I've been in love, but it's not true that I am secretly married or that I am secretly engaged, I have no permanent attachments and you can take my word for it."

There have been many rumours that Presley was engaged to Priscilla Beaulieu, the pretty 19-year-old daughter of an American Air Force captain he met while in the Army in Germany.
Last year, Priscilla took up an offer from Presley's father to live with the family at Memphis because her father was still in Germany. Presley's public promptly assumed she was engaged to Elvis.

Elvis: I know what people are saying. I knew that people would say it even before Priscilla came to stay with us. I had to make a decision and I made it. All I can say is that Priscilla is a great girl and I like her very much.
You never know what the future holds. All I can say is to repeat that I am not secretly married or secretly engaged.

Q: According to Ann-Margret (his co-star in Viva Las Vegas) you were or are engaged to her. This is not true either?

Elvis: The papers quoted her as saying it, but later she told me how it happened. They asked if it were true she was in love with me. Well, she was in love with me and she didn't want to lie about it. So she told them. And that's how it happened.

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Q: And she told you all this?

Elvis: Yes. Because she felt she owed me an explanation. She is an honest girl, a good girl and she told the truth. I have great respect for her. 

Q: Would that mean that all is over between you two?

Elvis: I haven't seen her in a while, but that is because she has been working in a movie. But that's all. I like her very much. I guess I have now told you more about my private life than I've told anybody. You can't expect more than that.
The main point I want to make is that I am not ready for marriage. I mean it sincerely and I feel very strongly about it.
Of course, people don't believe this is so and think I am playing games, but it is a deep conviction with me.
There are a great many, things want to do and I have to do them all first, and it may take a long time.

Meanwhile, I intend to stay the way I am and lead the life the way I lead it now.

I like my present ways and there is no reason in the world to change anything.

I believe I have matured since I first came to Hollywood. You see it reflected in my pictures. The dialogue is more mature because I am ready for it.

You asked me how far is the Colonel "the boss"?
I have left it to the Colonel to guide my career and I trust him because he knows his business like nobody else. But I draw my own conclusions and make my own decisions.
 
Which includes anything from picking the songs for my new film, to cutting a new record, to falling in love....
 
Q: It still leaves the Colonel with a heavy load of responsibilities doesn't it!

Elvis: You bet it does...

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Presley smiled as he said that. Across the Paramount studios, in an office, cluttered with Presley posters and records, the legend behind the legend is talking on the telephone to a film magnate.

Colonel (a title he claims was conferred on him by several State governors) Tom Parker's voice is as sweet as honey.
"If you don't want us." purrs the Colonel. "you wouldn't call us. You know what's good for the public and so do we, so we are in full agreement, aren't we?"

"Nobody has yet lost any money on a Presley picture and you're much to good a man to be the first . . . Now 1965 and 1966 are filled but if you want a word of advice, take spot No.1 in 1967 for 750,000 dollars (nearly £270,000) and I tell you, sir, you will never regret it."

Nothing can bother Elvis Presley while Colonel is taking care of things in the background. Tough-talking producers, hard-dealing impresarios, the Colonel looks after that side of the business.
Girls, Presley can handle.

And as for the new popliners who are challenging him. . Well, Presley has 51 Gold Discs to show he was king for eight years and could well be again.

"The Beatles?" asks Presley "Do they bother me?" Of course not. They are entertainers like myself and I guess they are as dedicated as the rest of us. In the long run, this is all that matters."

Mr. Elvis Presley is of course, entitled to his own opinions.
Source for the text: http://www.elvisinfonet.com/interview_Elvis_Presley_1964%20_My_Fast_Life.html

Photos: https://www.elvis-collectors.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=8&t=88702#p1394902

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Re: ROUSTABOUT (1964) - The Film

Post by goldbelt »

Thanks everyone.
MikeFromHolland wrote: Cool!!!!! Thanks for the share and the wonderful OP!



Fyi: many more Roustabout on-set pics are to be found in this thread:

An awful lot of rarely seen B&W's - movie related (on set)
https://www.elvis-collectors.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=8&t=88702#p1394902

.
Thanks Mike, I should have posted a link to your topic at the time. It's a shame that some of the photos within it are not displaying now but there are still some great pictures there.

And here is a link to the post which contained the Roustabout lobby card scans, thanks to that member too
--> https://www.elvis-collectors.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=77284&start=125#p1184526

For Elvis movie fans, there are some great movie posters and lobby cards in that topic, covering many Elvis movies, but again, not all the pictures are displaying now as it's an older topic.
--> https://www.elvis-collectors.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=77284


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Re: ROUSTABOUT (1964) - The Film

Post by goldbelt »

Roustabout publicity photo shoot with Joan Freeman

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Re: ROUSTABOUT (1964) - The Film

Post by Johnny2523 »

Great topic.. very informative and on point!!

Wasn't it actually stated ones that elvis did the "fence" stunt himself (which made the scar on his head a real one?)


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Re: ROUSTABOUT (1964) - The Film

Post by Ciscoking »

Such well-researched and informative postings remind me of how talented our man was and to be honest ..to re-visit movies...or as in other cases songs..or concerts...from later years...that you have almost forgotten...it's a great gesture by great fans..thank you..when I am at it...Also Juan Luis ....Mike Wimdgreen...Goldbelt.. etc..Just keep on posting...it's so great..from real Fans
.to real fans..


Thanks to Ernst Joergensen, Roger Semon and Erik Rasmussen for the great work. Keep the spirit alive !
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Re: ROUSTABOUT (1964) - The Film

Post by norrie »

Nice post goldbelt .
It's one of the few Elvis movies that I would still watch today.


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Re: ROUSTABOUT (1964) - The Film

Post by colonel snow »

Colonel Parker on the set


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Re: ROUSTABOUT (1964) - The Film

Post by Mike Windgren »

Hi there!! :D :D :D.
jetblack wrote:Fantastic posts Goldbelt.

I love how in this video Miss Stanwyck seeming a bit nervous runs her hand up and down the inside of Elvis' jacket. A very nice moment.

..

Andy
Cool! 8). Just a thought, with all the donations (thousands of $$$) Elvis gave during lifetime!. Did he get benefits on his annual tax returns.? :roll:.

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P.S: This picture posted on this topic, the man second on the right is Director of the Roustabout movie: John Rich :wink:. Bye for now :smt006.


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Re: ROUSTABOUT (1964) - The Film

Post by goldbelt »

Johnny2523 wrote:Great topic.. very informative and on point!!

Wasn't it actually stated ones that elvis did the "fence" stunt himself (which made the scar on his head a real one?)
Thanks.

The studio would surely never have allowed their major star to have attempted such a stunt. But the stunt is so well executed that, even using frame by frame advance on the dvd, there are only one or two frames that really give away that it was not Elvis crashing through the fence.

Not sure where the story about the cut being written in to cover up a real on set injury originated.

One wonders if the known on set photos of blood running down his face may have simply been theatrical blood in preparation for the bike crash scene itself, mistaken from the photos as a real injury.

He already has the biker jacket on in the photo, which he doesn't wear in the movie until the Wheels On My Heels number just prior to bike crash anyway, so this can hardly place such an injury occurring during the tea house fight scene. A fight scene that appears precisely choreographed and doesn't seem to put Elvis in danger. And he wouldn't have had to have begged to do his own fight scene anyway, since it was included to demonstrate HIS Karate skills.

Maybe someone has more information as to the original source of the story.

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Re: ROUSTABOUT (1964) - The Film

Post by Steve Morse »

An entertaining read. Thanks to all who have contributed with both observations and content.

I really enjoyed watching the trailer - it was very well put together. Definitely one the best mid-60s Elvis films.


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Re: ROUSTABOUT (1964) - The Film

Post by drjohncarpenter »

A few interesting things about this 1964 release not mentioned:

- Mae West was originally offered the part taken later by Barbara Stanwyck:

In 1964, Paramount courted her for a role in an Elvis Presley film, Roustabout, sending studio executive Paul Nathan to meet with her at the Ravenswood ... When Nathan revealed she would play a carnival owner ... she immediately dismissed him.

Jim Watts - Mae West: An Icon in Black and White
https://books.google.com/books?id=xpMzyL6w2v4C&pg=PA285



- To this day, there is no credible reason known for the film's removal of the original, dynamic title song, written by Otis Blackwell and Winfred Scott and recorded by Presley with real fire at the March 1964 Paramount soundtrack sessions. At the 11th hour, a milquetoast backing track written by Bill Giant, Bernie Baum and Florence Kaye was cut in late April, and Elvis dubbed his vocals to it in mid-May, just before filming ended.

This never happened before or after. Very odd indeed!


..




- As far as #1 albums in 1965, Roustabout held the slot for one week. The Beatles, as in 1964, dominated this chart, holding down #1 for almost half the year.

Beatles - 24 weeks
Mary Poppins (soundtrack) - 14 weeks
Herb Alpert's Tijuana Brass - 5 weeks
Goldfinger (soundtrack) - 3 weeks
Rolling Stones - 3 weeks
The Sound Of Music (soundtrack) - 2 weeks
Roustabout (soundtrack) - 1 week

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Billboard_200_number-one_albums_of_1965




- In 2008, Elvis '57 author Alan Hanson posted an excellent essay on his blog about this film:

Roustabout … A Review of Elvis Presley's Sixteenth Movie
http://www.elvis-history-blog.com/roustabout.html

His summary is quite good:
Roustabout was not as big a hit as its predecessor, Viva Las Vegas. As Elvis’s co-star, the well-respected Barbara Stanwyck brought some legitimacy to Roustabout, but at the box office she could not expand on Presley’s core audience like Ann-Margret did in the Vegas film. I recall being a little disappointed with Roustabout when I viewed it on its release in 1964. All these years later, however, I’m not as focused on its music as I was then, and so I find the overall movie to be solid, if light, entertainment. But then, my positive assessment of the film today may also be based on something I now know about Roustabout that I didn’t know in 1964—the declining quality of most Elvis movies that would follow it.


.
Dr. John Carpenter, M.D.
Stop, look and listen, baby <<--->> that's my philosophy!

Hard Rocker

Re: ROUSTABOUT (1964) - The Film

Post by Hard Rocker »

Great post Goldbelt. Many thanks.



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Re: ROUSTABOUT (1964) - The Film

Post by FRENCHGUY »

There's a Roustabout revival going on right here on FECC. I like that! :D

Mike, I fear an "anti-revisionists" raid will soon occur here...

Goldbelt, thanks a lot for this invigorating topic !


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Re: ROUSTABOUT (1964) - The Film

Post by goldbelt »

drjohncarpenter wrote:- To this day, there is no credible reason known for the film's removal of the original, dynamic title song, written by Otis Blackwell and Winfred Scott and recorded by Presley with real fire at the March 1964 Paramount soundtrack sessions. At the 11th hour, a milquetoast backing track written by Bill Giant, Bernie Baum and Florence Kaye was cut in late April, and Elvis dubbed his vocals to it in mid-May, just before filming ended.
There was a completely credible reason for the rejection of 'I'm A Roustabout' from the movie, It was outlined in a memo from Hal Wallis - and you were very involved in the topic where the reason was discovered.

Also note the date of Hal Wallis' memo stating that the Giant, Baum and Kaye one is "far superior" - 6th March 1964. Very early on in the process.
musiclover1979 wrote:Again, I have to refer to the Appendix in Bill Bram's book "Elvis Frame by Frame":

on p. 340:

"Memo to Paul Nathan; From Hal Wallis; Dated 03/06/64


Selected quotes:

"The new recording made yesterday of 'It's Carnival Time' is not satisfactory ... there is no spirit to it...."

"Concerning the song "Roustabout": the one by Giant, Baum & Kaye is far superior to the one by Blackwell and Scott.

The latter is far to [sic] busy a song and far too many words. Also, some of the phrases have a dirty connotation."
http://www.elvis-collectors.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=97841&hilit=roustabout+another+lost+song&start=50#p1593480


drjohncarpenter wrote: - As far as #1 albums in 1965, Roustabout held the slot for one week. The Beatles, as in 1964, dominated this chart, holding down #1 for almost half the year.

Beatles - 24 weeks
Mary Poppins (soundtrack) - 14 weeks
Herb Alpert's Tijuana Brass - 5 weeks
Goldfinger (soundtrack) - 3 weeks
Rolling Stones - 3 weeks
The Sound Of Music (soundtrack) - 2 weeks
Roustabout (soundtrack) - 1 week

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Billboard_200_number-one_albums_of_1965
This topic is about Roustabout the film, and some brief but salient information was given regarding it's soundtrack album's performance when compared to other musical soundtracks of the period which featured situational songs used as part of the movie narrative.

The Beatles are irrelevant in this discussion.

Though you neglect to mention that The Beatles chart dominance in 1965 was down to them releasing a total of 3 different albums that year that each made the top spot.

Mary Poppins outperformed each and every one of their releases in 1965. A musical soundtrack album. Hence the relevance.

:smt023