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I'm 10,000 Years Old - Elvis Country - 1971 & 2008

Thu Jan 08, 2009 3:00 pm

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The album Elvis Country was released on January the 2nd, 1971 and it reached number 12 on the Billboard charts, spending 21 weeks there and selling more than 500.000 copies, thus qualifying for a gold record.
In the UK charts, it peaked at number 6 during its 9-week chart run.
A CD re-issue appeared in 2000.

On Decenber 8th, 1970 a single containing "I Really Don't Want To Know" and "There Goes My Everything" was released, reaching number 21 on the Hot Billboard charts. On the international market, the A side chosen for the single was "There Goes My Everything" (UK charts no. 9). That song reached #9 too on the US Country Billboard charts.

Ernst Jorgensen would later write: "This album of country material is well received and offers a puzzling 'album concept' as snippets of the Golden Gate Quartet's 'I Was Born About 10,000 Years Ago' are interspersed between the cuts - but neither critical acceptance nor theme nor performance pushes the record beyond the customary half-million copies"

So, perhaps he considered it more of a critical success than a commercial one at the time, although this album has gained recognition, over the years, as one his finest efforts.

In 2008, we got the FTD 'Classic Album' 2-CD release in a 7 inch sleeve.

This had the original album tracks [complete with the snippets linking them] together with some bonus songs, country jams, alternate masters, first takes, undubbed masters and outtakes !

The original album consisted of 12 tracks [13 with the snippets] that Elvis recorded at his 'marathon' sessions in June & September, 1970, which produced many tracks with a country music flavour.

Many consider this was his first, perhaps only, true 'concept' album.

Disc 1

The original album:

1] Snowbird - 2:04 - 22nd Sept. - Elvis sings this pretty straight, neither adding nor deducting much from the Anne Murray 1969 original.
A song perhaps not entirely suited to his style. Chet Atkins did an instrumental version in 1971.

2] Tomorrow Never Comes - 3:53 - 7th June - A dramatic beat ballad, first done by Ernest Tubb in 1944, although Elvis may have been more familiar with the 'bolero-style' covers by Glen Campbell [1963], B J Thomas [1966] or even Slim Whitman [1970].
A fine performance from Elvis, who tackles this in a style reminiscent of Roy Orbison at full throttle !

3] Little Cabin On The Hill - 1:45 - 4th June - A country 'standard' from 1947, [aka Little Cabin Home On The Hill] the original by Bill Monroe & The Moon Grass Boys.
[The composer was Lester Flatt who released his own solo version in 1971].
Elvis gives this an authentic country sound, ably backed by some fine harmonica from Charlie McCoy.

4] Whole Lotta Shakin' Goin' On - 3:00 - 22nd Sept. - First recorded by Big Maybelle in March 1955 & Roy Hall covered it in September 1955.
Elvis gives the Jerry Lee Lewis hit a blistering workout and loses none of the fire.
This is pure rock 'n' roll & Elvis gives it his all ! Great stuff !

5] Funny How Time Slips Away - 4:20 - 7th June - There were versions of this by Billy Walker & Jimmy Elledge in 1961, with the composer, Willie Nelson issuing his in 1962. Then there were covers by Johnny Tillotson [1962], Joe Hinton [1964] and [after Elvis] Dorothy Moore in 1976.
Elvis does a fine job on this plaintive country song in which the clever lyric has a guy meeting his 'ex' and apparently wishing her well, but with a sting-in-the-tail !
Although he draws from the Elledge version, he makes this song his own !

6] I Really Don't Want To Know - 2:45 - 7th June - An Eddy Arnold original from 1954, with covers, that year, from The Flamingoes, Billy Ward & The Dominoes, & Les Paul & Mary Ford followed by Tommy Edwards [1960], Solomon Burke [1961], Little Esther Phillips [1963], Ronnie Dove [1966] & Carl Smith [released 1968 but was recorded much earlier].
Elvis does another good job on this country favourite, and captures the same languid feel of the Les Paul & Mary Ford single, with some solid but sensitive backing, including some nice David Briggs piano.

7] There Goes My Everything - 2:55 - 8th June - Recorded by Ferlin Husky in 1965, although the first chart appearance was Jack Greene in 1966, and in the UK, we were more familiar with the 1967 smash hit version from [the very non-country] Engelbert Humperdink !
Elvis does a workmanlike job on this smooth ballad, following Jack Greene's version, but no fireworks.

8] It's Your Baby, You Rock It - 2:56 - 5th June - Unusual lyric - the singer is addressing the new man of his 'ex' - and he is not sympathetic !
Excellent vocal from Elvis and the backing girl singers on this lively country rocker.
The fade on the master stops us hearing Elvis' lyric change right at the end !

9] The Fool - 2:26 - 4th June - A Sandford Clark original from 1955 [the 1956 re-issue went top 10 in the US].
Al Casey had an instrumental cover in '56 also [Fool's Blues].
Other covers were heard from The Gallahads [1956] & Jamie Coe [1963]. Clark's similarly titled The Return of the Fool in 1969 may have reminded Elvis of this song.
Elvis omits an important bit of the lyric here [he nails it on the outtake] but a good version, very close to the original.

10] Faded Love - 3:04 - 7th June - A Bob Wills & His Texas Playboys original from 1946 [as an instrumental & later in 1950 with lyrics] with covers from Leon McAuliff [1962] & Patsy Cline had a posthumous US hit with it in 1963.
Pure country, but done by Elvis as country-rock. Fine backing with some excellent harmonica from Charlie McCoy and some horns have been added in post-production.
The master is subject to an early fade [we get the full-length one later].

11] I Washed My Hands In Muddy Water - 3:41 - 7th June - A Stonewall Jackson original from 1965 with covers from Charlie Rich [1965], Johnny Rivers [1966] & Canadian Ted Daigle [date unknown]. In what sounds like an impromptu jam, Elvis doesn't want this to ever stop ! The master is faded early [we get a longer rough mix later]. More fine harmonica and piano backing.

12] Make The World Go Away - 3:34 - 7th June - Both Ray Price & Timi Yuro [in that order] had hits with this in 1963, but the song is most associated with Eddy Arnold's country version from 1965. Elvis does a fine job on it here, with influences from both the Arnold & Yuro versions present, and the blend of lead vocal, support vocals & the backing is captured perfectly. Great stuff !

Bonus songs:


13] I Was Born About 10,000 Years Ago - 3:11 - 4th June - A traditional song, first recording is by Kelly Harrel in 1925.
Heard in snippets as the between-track link on the original album, and then in full on the 1972 album: Elvis Now.
Another one sounding like a studio jam and nailed in one take.
Given a lively run through by Elvis, this master is faded early [we got a longer version on the 70's box set in 1995].

14] Where Did They Go, Lord - 2:27 - 22nd September - Not really a religious song, more a lament about lost love !
Elvis gives a heart-felt performance on this. Used as the flip of the single: Rags To Riches in 1971.

The Country Jam

15] Faded Love [Country version] - 0:36 - 4th June - Really just a short, informal, incomplete try-out.
We had this on Essential IV - A Hundred Years From Now in 1996.
They did the song properly on the 7th.

16] The Fool Take 1 - 2:20 - 4th June - The point of the song is that the singer finally admits that "I'm that fool" the one he's been singing about !
Elvis omits that confession on the master ! But he sings it here. First on Essential IV - A Hundred Years From Now in 1996.

17] A Hundred Years From Now Takes 1 [1:50] & 2 [1:24] - 4th June - Original by Lester Flatt & Earl Scruggs in 1957.
The Elvis master that we heard on the 1995 70's box set was a splice of the two takes.
This enabled them to edit out some slightly naughty lyrics !
We first got the two together [complete] on the 2002 FTD release: Nashville Marathon.

18] Little Cabin Home On The Hill Take 1 - 2:04 - 4th June - Slightly longer than the master take, we first got this on Essential IV - A Hundred Years From Now in 1996.

Alternate Masters

19] It's Your Baby, You Rock It Take 3 - 3:09 - 5th June - First heard on the FTD release: Nashville Marathon in 2002.
The sleeve here doesn't say the take number, but the booklet does.

20] Faded Love Take 3 - 4:18 - 7th June - They finally settled on the shorter Take 1 as the master [Take 2 was a false start].
We first heard this take on Essential IV - A Hundred Years From Now in 1996.

First Takes

21] Tomorrow Never Comes Take 1 - 3:20 - 7th June - Shorter than the master, heard here for the first time.

22] Tomorrow Never Comes - Take 2 - 3:53 - 7th June - As long as the master now ! First heard on Nashville Marathon in 2002.

23] Snowbird rehearsal [0:48] & Take 1 - 2:05 - First release for the rehearsal [it fades in after the start] but we got the Take 1 on Nashville Marathon in 2002.

24] Where Did They Go, Lord Take 1 - 2:20 - 22nd Sept - From Essential IV - A Hundred Years From Now in 1996.

Disc 2

The undubbed June 7th Masters - Rough mixes made by Felton Jarvis immediately after the sessions, before any overdubs were recorded.

1] I Really Don't Want To Know Master but unknown take number - 2:46 - First release of this here with this mix.

2] Faded Love Take 2 - 0:32 [False start - rehearsal ?] - Take 1 Master - 4:06 - Later fade than the official master.
From 70's Box Set in 1995.

3] Tomorrow Never Comes Take 12 - 0:31 [False start] - Take 13 - 3:53 - First official release here.
[Master was a splice of take 13 & work part take 1].

4] Make The World Go Away - Take 1 - 1:45 [False start] Take 3 - 3:33 - This first surfaced on the 1977 album Welcome To My World, although the sleeve claimed it was a live track !
The Take 1 false start makes its first appearance here.
Master was a splice of take 3 and work part take 1 [ending].

5] Funny How Time Slips Away - 4:20 - Master - Take 1 - First appearance with this mix.

6] I Washed My Hands in Muddy Water - 4:23 - Master - Take 1.
First appearance with this mix - and the later fade makes a longer version than the master, although we got an even longer version [4:47] on Essential IV - A Hundred Years From Now in 1996, and there has been a 5:11 version released unofficially.

June Outtakes

7] I Didn't Make It On Playing Guitar - 3:40 - 5th - From Essential IV - A Hundred Years From Now [1996]
A studio instrumental jam with some delicious Elvis vocal interjections, luckily picked up by the mic on his acoustic guitar !
A longer edit of this jam has been available unofficially.

8] Tomorrow Never Comes - 7th - Take 3 - 2:42 - [Long false start] - Take 11 - 3:58 - Both here for the first time.

9] There Goes My Everything - Take 1 - 8th - 2:45 - From Great Country Songs in 1996.

September Outtakes
All from 22nd.

10] September Warm Up - 1:50 - An instrumental jam - hard to know what part Elvis played in it !
First time here.

11] Snowbird - Take 4 - 0:10 [False start] - Take 5 is called but nothing gets underway - Take 2 - 2:03 - The take 4 false start is new here, but Take 2 was on the Today, Tomorrow & Forever box set in 2002.

12] Where Did They Go, Lord - Take 2 - Just a couple of extremely short [new] false starts - Take 3 - 2:20 - We had this on Nashville Marathon in 2002.

13] Whole Lotta Shakin' Goin' On - Rough mix with horns - 4:35 - The infamous 'horn dub' version !
Although we got this long version on Essential IV - A Hundred Years From Now in 1996, this the first official release with those horns on !
Elvis was right to ask for their removal in my view ! The late fade reveals some deliciously fascinating [and sometimes wordless] Elvis vocalising that is almost orgasmic !

Bonus Cuts - Undubbed Rough Mixes From 7th June.

14] When I'm Over You - 3:27 - Master - Take unknown - late fade makes for a longer track. First official release.

15] The Next Step Is Love - 3:40 - Master - Take 11 - late fade makes for a longer track. First official release.

16] Love Letters - 2:48 - Master - Take 5 - first official release with this mix.

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Overall, an interesting and sometimes fascinating release !

Great to have all these tracks together on 2 CD's.

Elvis was obviously on top form at this time, still heady after the American Sound Studio sessions of '69, but not yet suffering from the boredom that crept in during '71.

A tad disappointing that so many of the outtakes have been released already, some on previous FTD releases !

But that may a symptom of the times; we must be getting nearer the bottom of that barrel with every release !

File under 'essential'...........................

My thanks to all who have given encouragement & come up with extra info !.

Timings: These are my own - I time from when the song starts properly to the dying note - no between-takes chat or count-ins.
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Last edited by ColinB on Fri Mar 06, 2009 2:27 am, edited 45 times in total.

Re: Elvis Country

Thu Jan 08, 2009 7:21 pm

ColinB wrote:
4] Whole Lotta Shakin' Goin' On - 3:00 - 22nd Sept. - This is pure rock 'n' roll ! Elvis gives the Jerry Lee Lewis hit a thorough workout and loses none of the fire of the original. Great stuff !



Just one correction (maybe I misunderstood), Jerry Lee's version wasn't the original one.

Re: Elvis Country

Thu Jan 08, 2009 7:34 pm

Rocker wrote:
ColinB wrote:
4] Whole Lotta Shakin' Goin' On - 3:00 - 22nd Sept. - This is pure rock 'n' roll ! Elvis gives the Jerry Lee Lewis hit a thorough workout and loses none of the fire of the original. Great stuff !



Just one correction (maybe I misunderstood), Jerry Lee's version wasn't the original one.


I never said it was.................... but thanks for reading the review anyway !

I've made a little edit to clarify things a bit.

So who did the original Shakin' ?

Re: Elvis Country

Thu Jan 08, 2009 7:49 pm

ColinB wrote:
Rocker wrote:
ColinB wrote:
4] Whole Lotta Shakin' Goin' On - 3:00 - 22nd Sept. - This is pure rock 'n' roll ! Elvis gives the Jerry Lee Lewis hit a thorough workout and loses none of the fire of the original. Great stuff !



Just one correction (maybe I misunderstood), Jerry Lee's version wasn't the original one.


I never said it was.................... but thanks for reading the review anyway !

I've made a little edit to clarify things a bit.

So who did the original Shakin' ?



I'm not 100% sure, but Big Maybelle (I believe this was her name) did a version before JLL and that version was almost completely reproduced by Valerie Wellington on the soundtrack to "Great balls of fire". There was also at least one other version, but I never heard it and can't remember the name of the artist, but that one may be the original.

Love the Country-album. In fact it was the first real album by Elvis that I owned. My father gave me his LP when I was around 10 I believe

Re: Elvis Country

Thu Jan 08, 2009 8:01 pm

Rocker wrote:I'm not 100% sure, but Big Maybelle (I believe this was her name) did a version before JLL and that version was almost completely reproduced by Valerie Wellington on the soundtrack to "Great balls of fire". There was also at least one other version, but I never heard it and can't remember the name of the artist, but that one may be the original.


Thanks for your help, Rocker !

I found out the original was by James Faye "Roy" Hall !

I'll add these details to the review...

Re: Elvis Country

Thu Jan 08, 2009 10:21 pm

I love the country album(s). And I'm really enjoying the review so far. Thanks.

Re: Elvis Country

Thu Jan 08, 2009 10:34 pm

Fantastic classy job Collin. This classic album, clocking at almost 39 minutes long, was released on January the 2nd, 1971 and it reached number 12 on the billboard charts, spending 21 weeks there and selling more than 500.000 copies, thus qualifying for a gold record. In the Uk charts, it peaked at number 6.

On decenber 8th, 1970 a single containing "I Really Don't Want To Know" and "There Goes My Everything" was released, reaching number 21 on the Hot Billboard charts. On the international market, the A side chosen for the single was "There Goes My Everything" (UK charts no. 9). That song reached #9 too on the US Country Billboard charts.

Re: Elvis Country

Thu Jan 08, 2009 10:37 pm

Monique wrote:I love the country album(s). And I'm really enjoying the review so far. Thanks.


It's a pleasure, Monique !

It's taking a while, because I'm keying it all in [not copying & pasting from anywhere] and making it up as I go !

Re: Elvis Country

Thu Jan 08, 2009 10:39 pm

I have a an open question: when do you think the "concept" was born? It seems that Elvis just starting doing country songs after the material he was offered was qualified "too weak". Country classic after country classic were revisited by the spirited singer and band. It was clear that after the june sessions the concept idea was taken again to the Nashvile studio on September. So it could be that after checking all the june material the "Country" album was born, or that it came up during that June 7th night?

Re: Elvis Country

Thu Jan 08, 2009 10:44 pm

frus75 wrote:Fantastic classy job Collin. This classic album, clocking at almost 39 minutes long, was released on January the 2nd, 1971 and it reached number 12 on the billboard charts, spending 21 weeks there and selling more than 500.000 copies, thus qualifying for a gold record. In the Uk charts, it peaked at number 6.

On decenber 8th, 1970 a single containing "I Really Don't Want To Know" and "There Goes My Everything" was released, reaching number 21 on the Hot Billboard charts. On the international market, the A side chosen for the single was "There Goes My Everything" (UK charts no. 9). That song reached #9 too on the US Country Billboard charts.


Thanks for your input, frus75 !

Ernst is dismissive of the 500,000 sale, citing it as being merely a 'customary half-million' !

But the album has grown in stature over the years among Elvis collectors !

Re: Elvis Country

Thu Jan 08, 2009 10:45 pm

ColinB wrote:
Monique wrote:I love the country album(s). And I'm really enjoying the review so far. Thanks.


It's a pleasure, Monique !

It's taking a while, because I'm keying it all in [not copying & pasting from anywhere] and making it up as I go !


Take your time. I'm a very patient person. Image Okay...I'm not, but I'm trying to be. :D

Re: Elvis Country

Thu Jan 08, 2009 10:58 pm

frus75 wrote:I have a an open question: when do you think the "concept" was born? It seems that Elvis just starting doing country songs after the material he was offered was qualified "too weak". Country classic after country classic were revisited by the spirited singer and band. It was clear that after the june sessions the concept idea was taken again to the Nashvile studio on September. So it could be that after checking all the june material the "Country" album was born, or that it came up during that June 7th night?


There are two things which happened just then which could have a bearing.

Firstly, Felton Jarvis, who was in the middle of preparing a new series of Elvis sessions, officially resigned from his position with RCA.

When Elvis then offered to hire him as his personal producer, he jumped at the chance ! Who wouldn't ?

Secondly, on the material front, although this was still to come via Freddy Bienstock, it was now almost entirely from the catalogue of Carlin, the British company he'd just bought from his cousins Jean & Julian Aberbach.

So, a new producer who was independent of RCA influence, and a new catalogue of material to choose from !

These two factors must have opened up access to a whole slew of 'new' songs to choose from !

And it looks like they were mostly country songs !

Re: Elvis Country

Fri Jan 09, 2009 12:34 am

ColinB wrote:
Ernst is dismissive of the 500,000 sale, citing it as being merely a 'customary half-million' !

But the album has grown in stature over the years among Elvis collectors !

In 1969-1971 there was a very hot-seller male artist, named Tom Jones. His albums went top ten and started selling like hot-cakes, not just his current ones but also his 1965-1968 previous works. Well I just say this because all of them went gold, but none went platinum, meaning that the albums didn't reached the million mark, so the 500.000 copies sold of Elvis Country are much more than customary.

BTW, Ernst (in his book) usually uses the 500.000 copies comment for all the "comeback" albums but I still wonder if he says that because they really sold just 500.000 or because of the fact that they achieved gold status. I make this comments because one of those "comeback" albums ("On Stage, Febuary 1970") eventually reached platinum status. So it could be that some of the other comeback albums sold more than half a milion, selling maybe 600.000, or 700.000 copies?

Re: Elvis Country

Fri Jan 09, 2009 12:54 am

frus75 wrote:
ColinB wrote:
Ernst is dismissive of the 500,000 sale, citing it as being merely a 'customary half-million' !

But the album has grown in stature over the years among Elvis collectors !

In 1969-1971 there was a very hot-seller male artist, named Tom Jones. His albums went top ten and started selling like hot-cakes, not just his current ones but also his 1965-1968 previous works. Well I just say this because all of them went gold, but none went platinum, meaning that the albums didn't reached the million mark, so the 500.000 copies sold of Elvis Country are much more than customary.

BTW, Ernst (in his book) usually uses the 500.000 copies comment for all the "comeback" albums but I still wonder if he says that because they really sold just 500.000 or because of the fact that they achieved gold status. I make this comments because one of those "comeback" albums ("On Stage, Febuary 1970") eventually reached platinum status. So it could be that some of the other comeback albums sold more than half a milion, selling maybe 600.000, or 700.000 copies?


You could well be right, frus75.

When Ernst used the term 'customary', I reckon he meant 'for an Elvis album at the time' !

Re: Elvis Country - 1971 & 2008

Sat Jan 10, 2009 4:16 pm

here an addition:

There goes my everything was original recording by Ferlin Husky in 1965.

I was born 10000 years ago was an original recording by Kelly Harrell in 1925.

colonel snow

Re: Elvis Country - 1971 & 2008

Sat Jan 10, 2009 4:22 pm

here another addition:

Faded love was recorded 15-04-46 by Bob Wills & his Texas Playboys; this is nearly an instrumental version with a few vocals added. The version with lyrics was recorded 27-04-50 by Bob Wills & his Texas Playboys.

Tomorrow never comes was recorded 13-01-44 by Ernest Tubb.

colonel snow

Re: Elvis Country - 1971 & 2008

Sat Jan 10, 2009 4:23 pm

colonel snow wrote:here an addition:

There goes my everything was original recording by Ferlin Husky in 1965.

I was born 10000 years ago was an original recording by Kelly Harrell in 1925.

colonel snow



Thanks !

I'll make an edit soon.

Re: Elvis Country - 1971 & 2008

Sat Jan 10, 2009 4:34 pm

Whole lotta shaking is going on>>

in wikipedia is mentioned that the song was recorded by the songwriter Roy Hall in sept. 1954 but that's wrong.

21-03-55 Big Maybelle recorded her version on Okeh 7060;

15-09-55 Roy Hall recorded his version on Decca 29697.

this can be verified on www.originalsproject.us and 78 rpm discography on line and more sources.

colonel snow

Re: Elvis Country - 1971 & 2008

Sat Jan 10, 2009 4:49 pm

colonel snow wrote:Whole lotta shaking is going on>>

in wikipedia is mentioned that the song was recorded by the songwriter Roy Hall in sept. 1954 but that's wrong.

21-03-55 Big Maybelle recorded her version on Okeh 7060;

15-09-55 Roy Hall recorded his version on Decca 29697.

this can be verified on http://www.originalsproject.us and 78 rpm discography on line and more sources.

colonel snow


Thanks again !

Edits done !

Re: Elvis Country - 1971 & 2008

Sat Jan 10, 2009 6:26 pm

here some more recording dates from original versions

I washed my hands in muddy water - 05-05-65 by Stonewall Jackson;

A hundred years from now - 24-03-57 by Lester Flatt & Earl Scruggs;

Make the world go away - recorded for the first time by Ray Price on 30-04-63; the well known version was recorded 13-06-63.

Funny how time slips away>>
21-04-61 by Billy Walker;
07-09-61 by Jimmy Elledge;
20-05-62 by Johnny Tillotson;

I really don't want to know - 23-10-53 by Eddy Arnold;

Little cabin on the hill - 27-10-47 by Bill Monroe;

Snowbird - 00-01-70 by Anne Murray


colonel snow
Last edited by colonel snow on Sun Jan 11, 2009 9:39 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Re: Elvis Country - 1971 & 2008

Sat Jan 10, 2009 6:41 pm

Colonel, you know your stuff, thank you.

Re: Elvis Country - 1971 & 2008

Sat Jan 10, 2009 8:30 pm

colonel snow wrote:Little canin on the hili


ben wrote:Colonel, you know your stuff, thank you.

Absolutely.

One of my favorite songs.

Re: Elvis Country - 1971 & 2008

Sat Jan 10, 2009 8:51 pm

Rob wrote:
colonel snow wrote:Little canin on the hili


Absolutely.

One of my favorite songs.


Is Old Shep the little canin on the hill?

It's great in the MDQ where Elvis is running through some of his impersonations and says Bill Monroe and goes into Little Cabin in true Monroe style!!

Re: Elvis Country - 1971 & 2008

Sat Jan 10, 2009 9:30 pm

ben wrote:Colin, I do hope you do a lot more reviews like this. It was very very good, one of the best reviews I have read.

Thank you.


You're welcome, ben and I'm glad you liked it ! !

I hope to do more, but it is a lot of work !

I started from the position of what I like to see in a review:

But it's a labour of love, of course !
Last edited by ColinB on Sun Jan 11, 2009 3:46 am, edited 1 time in total.

Re: Elvis Country - 1971 & 2008

Sun Jan 11, 2009 2:30 am

colonel snow wrote:here some more recording dates from original versions

I washed my hands in muddy water - 05-05-65 by Stonewall Jackson;

A hundred years from now - 24-03-57 by Lester Flatt & Earl Scruggs;

Make the world go away - recorded for the first time by Ray Price on 30-04-63; the well known version was recorded 13-06-63.

Funny how time slips away>>
21-04-61 by Billy Walker;
07-09-61 by Jimmy Elledge;
20-05-62 by Johnny Tillotson;

I really don't want to know - 23-10-53 by Eddy Arnold;

Little canin on the hili - 27-10-47 by Bill Monroe;

Snowbird - 00-01-70 by Anne Murray


Thanks again, colonel, some interesting details there !

I've made amendments where necessary, although in the actual review, I don't show the exact recording dates for originals or covers by other artists, just the year.