All posts with more than 3000 Hits, prior to 2008

Fri Jul 13, 2007 1:13 am

KiwiAlan wrote:For those advocating that Elvis should have made only one album a year in the 70's.

I would rather have 700 or so different songs out there to enjoy.....than 500 :!:


Me too !!!

:)

Fri Jul 13, 2007 1:43 am

KiwiAlan wrote:For those advocating that Elvis should have made only one album a year in the 70's.

I would rather have 700 or so different songs out there to enjoy.....than 500 :!:

Well just imagine that if EP wasn't locked into recording so much subpar material to meet the crazy multi-album yearly deadline, maybe instead of 500 mediocre (and in some cases embarrassing) tracks, today you could be listening to some real gems and career-defining tracks. Some here prefer quality versus quantity. We know where you stand on the issue.

Fri Jul 13, 2007 1:47 am

Given the absolute sh't publishing arrangements that governed Elvis recordings, I doubt we would have got any more quality songs. Sad, but true :(

Fri Jul 13, 2007 1:48 am

To be fair: Elvis didn't actually RECORD three albums a year. It was more like one huge (or two smaller sessions) would be held at which lots of songs were recorded. The albums than came from that accumulated material.

However, I do agree that the 3 a year release policy was asinine.

This policy however, was one that RCA had with many of its acts back in the day. So it wasn't just the "Golden" goose.

Fri Jul 13, 2007 1:50 am

KiwiAlan wrote:For those advocating that Elvis should have made only one album a year in the 70's.

I would rather have 700 or so different songs out there to enjoy.....than 500 :!:


I would interject that the same amount of material could have been put down on tape with a single studio album a year requirement. Let’s exclude the live album element for a moment. From an artistic perspective single 10-12 track studio albums from Elvis recordings sessions from this period could have seen higher quality product on the shelves. This approach worked well for artists such as Bruce Springsteen. In retrospect Elvis 70s output from what was laid down would have been better managed this way. Example:

1970 – “February 1970, On Stage” - June 1970, “That’s The Way It Is” – December 1970
1971 – “Elvis Country” - June 1971, “He Touched Me/Elvis Sings the Wonderful World Of Christmas” – December 1971
1972 – “As Recorded at Madison Square Garden” – June 1972, “Burning Love” – December 1972
1973 – “Aloha from Hawaii via Satellite” – April 1973 to tie in with the USA airdate of the TV special
1974 – “Promised Land” – June 1974
1975 – “Today” – June 1975
1976 – “From Elvis Presley Boulevard, Memphis Tennessee” June 1976

The gospel and Christmas material from 1971 could have made a double seasonal album much like the “Christmas Peace” concept, perhaps 10 select tracks from both genres. “Burning Love” would be a studio album comprising secular cuts from 1971 and 1972. “Promised Land” would utilise the 12 best cuts recorded throughout 1973 at Stax. This would leave plenty of non-album material for B-sides and stand alone singles thus potentially increasing sales.

Can you imagine the boxsets released today? Not simply alternate takes but new unheard songs! Anyway, as fun as the “what if?” game is history has already been written.

Side question: was “As Recorded at Madison Square Garden” promoted during the end credits of “Elvis On Tour”? The same question for “That’s The Way It Is”?
.

Fri Jul 13, 2007 3:28 am

I guess because I am a fan of his 70's work I can't really see the point in him recording less. He was being sold mainly as a country artist after Burning Love, and his new records did great in the country charts. So these new records were being recieved well, just by a different demographic. Also Jerry Lee, Johnny Cash, Willie Nelson, Kenny Rogers, Charlie Rich, you name them were all recording two to three 10-12 track albums a year in the 70's. As all of the above artists had been recording since the 50's this was not abnormal to them. Some people say (perhaps with the exception of Nelson) that not enough care was taken in the country albums as opposed to the rock albums of the era. I find this untrue in some ways because the rock records that were more of a "concept" somtimes just didn't hold up over the years. Now when I listen to a 70's country album most of it still sounds fresh and earthy. Elvis made some mistakes in the 70's as far as not insisting that Burning Love and Seperate Ways be part of a new album, but with exception of maybe the Xmas album or Having Fun On Stage. I think the albums were far better then his average soundtrack.

Fri Jul 13, 2007 5:03 am

Mike Eder wrote:...but with exception of maybe the Xmas album or Having Fun On Stage. I think the albums were far better then his average soundtrack.

You are in a handful of cases here comparing crap with crap. This is part of a much bigger picture and problem. EP's recording contract with regards to the soundtrack requirements, the 2-3 album release schedule in the 70's, RCA's lack of a true A&R presence for their biggest star, a lackluster producer, and the publishing deal Parker had in place had a lasting negative impact on Elvis' recording legacy. But it is what it is. So we are all left with an album like Raised On Rock; an album that was way beneath the talents, abilities and standards of an artist of Elvis' stature. Hopefully the FTD package presents this material in the best possible light.

Fri Jul 13, 2007 6:17 am

1973 album: Aloha From Hawaii via Satellite

Aloha Singles:
1: Steamroller Blues - Burning Love
2: My Way - I’m So Lonesome I Could Cry

Studio single announcing the upcoming new album in 1974:
3: Raised On Rock - Find Out What’s Happening

1974 album: Promised Land

Side A: Promised Land - Just A Little Bit - I’ve Got A Thing About You Baby - Loving Arms - For Ol’ Times Sake - It’s Midnight
Side B: You Asked Me To - If You Talk In Your Sleep - There’s A Honky Tonk Angel - Help Me - Good Time Charlie’s Got The Blues - Talk About The Good Times

Singles:
1: Promised Land - If You Don’t Come Back
2: My Boy - Thinking About You: European release. You Asked Me To - Thinking About You: USA release
3: I Got A Feelin’ In My Body - If That Isn’t Love: Gospel release

Fri Jul 13, 2007 10:14 am

midnightx wrote:
Mike Eder wrote:...but with exception of maybe the Xmas album or Having Fun On Stage. I think the albums were far better then his average soundtrack.

You are in a handful of cases here comparing crap with crap. This is part of a much bigger picture and problem. EP's recording contract with regards to the soundtrack requirements, the 2-3 album release schedule in the 70's, RCA's lack of a true A&R presence for their biggest star, a lackluster producer, and the publishing deal Parker had in place had a lasting negative impact on Elvis' recording legacy. But it is what it is. So we are all left with an album like Raised On Rock; an album that was way beneath the talents, abilities and standards of an artist of Elvis' stature. Hopefully the FTD package presents this material in the best possible light.


Well I do respectfully disagree, I think Elvis' 70's studio work is very good overall. As said earlier I truly like Raised On Rock (with the exception of Girl Of Mine) and again with the exception of the two LP's I mentioned I enjoy playing all the 70's LP's. The soundtracks had their moments but Elvis never even came close to recordings a song as bad as Kismet, or Yoga Is during the seventies.

Fri Jul 13, 2007 11:10 am

Given that so many fans on here have complained about the fact that there are 700 songs and many of those songs are so weak some of these comments are kind of odd.

The reason that many country performers were following the three LP model was because that market was still being driven primarily by single sales at least until Waylon Jennings' Honky Tonk Heroes. With very few exceptions, country LPs rarely scaled the top of the charts and this may have been why. Plus, even country and R&B acts did not release as many albums as Elvis did. What was the total in 1970- seven?

The new format established by acts like Led Zeppelin was more economic. It made sense to go with that format. It would have led to a happier, richer Elvis and an Elvis with a better reputation.

I believe the relentlessly grinding pace demanded by RCA did more damage than the publishing deal by exacerbating that problem. While the deal may have cost Elvis a crack at a first rate piece like "Just Can't Help Believing" there was just not enough non-performer based music out there, outside of some producers like Gamble and Huff who had their own publishing empires, there was just not enough first rate material available to fill 30-36 songs per year. It was just a brutal expectation to fill even in the 1960s.

In the early 1960s for instance, it was the industry standard, but Elvis' biggest problem at that time was the sheer volume of material he had to record and the slighter consideration that some of that material was tailored to a particular situation. Elvis in the early to mid-1960s had access to lots of first rate songwriters- Pomus and Shuman, Don Robertson, Otis Blackwell, Bob Johnston etc. They just couldn't fill all those requirements particularly in a movie context.

Mike I agree that the overall quality of Elvis' work in the 1970s was very sharp. However, compared to his golden days in the '50s and early '60s he had access to fewer full fledged original classics. His desire to be in the studio in July 1973 was not any greater than it was in 1965 with PHS. And in the 1960s, his mood was such that he could generally fake enthusiasm better. Listen to "Girl Happy" he sings the sand out of those songs. In the 1970s he lacked that capacity. When Elvis came into the studio with a purpose as he did in June 1970 or March 1972 or with a sense of commitment like in 1975 or December 1973 he could still work magic. It just wasn't as automatic as it once was.

Fri Jul 13, 2007 11:35 am

likethebike wrote:The reason that many country performers were following the three LP model was because that market was still being driven primarily by single sales at least until Waylon Jennings' Honky Tonk Heroes. With very few exceptions, country LPs rarely scaled the top of the charts and this may have been why.


It sure didn't have anything to do with lack of quality. Every single album released by Webb Pierce, George Jones and Bill Anderson in the '60s and early-to-mid '70s (and like I said there are millions of them) is better than all Led Zeppelin albums put together! That is the truth and nothing but the truth... :wink:

Keith Richards, Jr.

Fri Jul 13, 2007 5:29 pm

Matthew wrote:1973 album: Aloha From Hawaii via Satellite

Aloha Singles:
1: Steamroller Blues - Burning Love
2: My Way - I’m So Lonesome I Could Cry


Why a live single of Burning Love Matthew? It's a bit pointless given that the studio version was such a huge hit only a short time before. To me, You Gave Me a Mountain was practically screaming for a single release. It should have been a lead-off single for the lp.
Aloha singles:
1.) You Gave Me a Mountain/I'll Remember You
2.) Steamroller Blues/It's Over

Fri Jul 13, 2007 6:57 pm

Keith Richards, Jr. wrote:....Every single album released by Webb Pierce, George Jones and Bill Anderson in the '60s and early-to-mid '70s (and like I said there are millions of them) is better than all Led Zeppelin albums put together! That is the truth and nothing but the truth... :wink:

Keith Richards, Jr.

Yeah, maybe in fantasy land.... :roll:

Fri Jul 13, 2007 7:20 pm

If you look at the history that until the mid-60's the industry was a singles market. Even after it became an album market RCA was clearly marketing Elvis as if it were still a singles market. They were way behind the times.

They would release the best singles and leave them OFF the album.

Songs like "suspiscious minds", "Don't cry daddy", or "kentucky rain", could have been included on "from ELvis in memphis", but were not.
They didn't even make "back in memphis".

You don't see, "I'm Leavin", on the "love letters" album.

"Burning Love" was left to hang with a bunch of old movie songs on a budget label.

So people don't associate some of Elvis best later singles with any particular album because they were not on any album.

Fri Jul 13, 2007 9:29 pm

In a few instances RCA did NOT include a single on an album during the 70's, but those are the exceptions. Promised Land was the title cut of a 1975 album. Later that year, T-R-O-U-B-L-E was the lead track on Today. For the Heart and Hurt were featured tracks on Elvis Presley Boulevard. And of course there's those infamous Separate Ways and Burning Love albums....For the most part, it looks like RCA (or the Colonel) thought they needed the hit singles to help sell the albums. And they were probably right.

Fri Jul 13, 2007 9:42 pm

Lonely Summer wrote:In a few instances RCA did NOT include a single on an album during the 70's, but those are the exceptions. Promised Land was the title cut of a 1975 album. Later that year, T-R-O-U-B-L-E was the lead track on Today. For the Heart and Hurt were featured tracks on Elvis Presley Boulevard. And of course there's those infamous Separate Ways and Burning Love albums....For the most part, it looks like RCA (or the Colonel) thought they needed the hit singles to help sell the albums. And they were probably right.


YES INDEED!

- in the ghetto/any day now was featured on from elvis in memhis,
- from M to Vegas, Veags to memphis included a live version of suspicious minds and you'll think of me

- the wonder of you - on stage
- you don't have to say you love me - ttwii (and also included a live version of i've lost you and patch it up
- i really don't want to know/there goes my everything (elvis country)
- life (love letters)
- merry xmas-oh come (wonderful world of xmas)

and so on....

Indeed that only happened from 1960-1962 and it was a common practice for other artists, such as sinatra, dean martin, etc.

Sat Jul 14, 2007 5:42 am

Pete Dube wrote:
Matthew wrote:1973 album: Aloha From Hawaii via Satellite

Aloha Singles:
1: Steamroller Blues - Burning Love
2: My Way - I’m So Lonesome I Could Cry


Why a live single of Burning Love Matthew? It's a bit pointless given that the studio version was such a huge hit only a short time before. To me, You Gave Me a Mountain was practically screaming for a single release. It should have been a lead-off single for the lp.
Aloha singles:
1.) You Gave Me a Mountain/I'll Remember You
2.) Steamroller Blues/It's Over


Utilising the live version of "Burning Love" as a b side to "Steamroller Blues" would serve to play off the success of the "Burning Love" single from 1972 and also serve as a decent B side to a blues rock song. "You Gave Me A Mountain" from Feb '72 would have served as a better B-side to "An American Trilogy" in 1972.[/i]

Sat Jul 14, 2007 10:18 am

Keith- I'm not implying the albums lacked quality so much but that the industry was built around single sales and like Elvis' albums those country albums didn't really establish an identity in the market place.

Matthew- I agree that the live "Burning Love" would have made a nice B-side. People like a commodity they know. Singles buyers and LP buyers didn't always cross over and for the people who would buy a "Steamroller Blues" single or a "You Gave Me a Mountain" it would help to have something familiar on the other side.

Sat Jul 14, 2007 4:26 pm

If the February '72 version of You Gave Me a Mountain was released as the b-side of American Trilogy, I'll bet dj's would've given that side the bulk of the airplay and it would've done much better on the Billboard Hot 100 than did Trilogy. At least top 40. But I still think the Aloha version was the one that should've been on a single. With the exposure of the show it had the potential to go top 15.

Regarding the ridiculous release schedule, I think they could've gotten away with 2 albums a year. 1 studio album and 1 "specialty" album (live, gospel, Christmas), plus an occasional hits compilation. The schedule could've looked like this:
1970-
June: On Stage Feb. 1970
August: 50 Worldwide Gold Award Hits Vol. 1
December: TTWII
1971-
June: Elvis Country
August: The Other Sides (50 WW old Award Hits Vol. 2)
November: The Wonderful World of Christmas
1972-
April: He Touched Me
July: Elvis As Recorded At MSG
November: Elvis' Gold Records Vol. 5
1973- (new contract for 2 lp's a year)
February: Aloha From Hawaii
Aug.: Studio lp featuring the best of the Elvis Now; Elvis; ROR tracks
1974-
May: Promised Land
November: Live On Stage In Memphis (with an adjusted repertoire)
1975-
June: Elvis Today
November: Elvis' Gold Records Vol. 6
1976-
April: The Sun Sessions
November: Moody Blue (best tracks from E.P. Boulevard and Moody Blue)
1977- Elvis takes the year off and gets clean and healthy. :)
March: A Legendary Performer Vol. 1
November: A new studio album.

Sat Jul 14, 2007 11:03 pm

Pete Dube wrote:Regarding the ridiculous release schedule, I think they could've gotten away with 2 albums a year. 1 studio album and 1 "specialty" album (live, gospel, Christmas), plus an occasional hits compilation. The schedule could've looked like this:....

Pete, if it was a "2" album per year deal, one can argue that the quality of material would have been much stronger. Not so much filler would have been required to be tackled in the studio to fill out all the LP releases RCA was trying to push. So the albums known today would have perhaps been completely different. Even if EP would have only been contracted to actually record for one album, a major overhaul of the A&R representation at RCA would have been crucial to make one album worthwhile and succeed.

Pete Dube wrote:1977- Elvis takes the year off and gets clean and healthy. :)
March: A Legendary Performer Vol. 1
November: A new studio album.

Well, maybe EP could have stayed in Hawaii for a few months after Aloha in 73 in an attempt to get clean and healthy. Certainly an intervention was necessary way before 1977....

Sun Jul 15, 2007 12:52 am

Rob wrote:
Steve1971 wrote:Ya Rob I'm gonna pass on it. But I hope everyone one likes it and enjoys it. I just dont think its worth spending money on an Album that I already have because it has unreleased rehersals on it.

It could just be my frame of mind, but I just can't make myself pass up an FTD. I must admit though that I haven't tried very hard.
Hell, I was even going to offer to buy it for you, but since you've insinuated several times that you're not interested, so be it.

As for me, I'm looking forward to this one more than I have any other in quite awhile.


YOU were going to buy it for me? Ya right. Why do I find it hard to believe and a sick joke? But if you were serious then I hey I'll take it.

:)

Sun Jul 15, 2007 3:56 am

Steve1971 wrote:
Rob wrote:
Steve1971 wrote:Ya Rob I'm gonna pass on it. But I hope everyone one likes it and enjoys it. I just dont think its worth spending money on an Album that I already have because it has unreleased rehersals on it.

It could just be my frame of mind, but I just can't make myself pass up an FTD. I must admit though that I haven't tried very hard.
Hell, I was even going to offer to buy it for you, but since you've insinuated several times that you're not interested, so be it.

As for me, I'm looking forward to this one more than I have any other in quite awhile.


YOU were going to buy it for me? Ya right. Why do I find it hard to believe and a sick joke? But if you were serious then I hey I'll take it.

:)


Not hard to believe ...

Rob has been generous in the past, giving away CD's.

Rich

Sun Jul 15, 2007 5:49 am

Rich_TCB wrote:
Steve1971 wrote:
Rob wrote:
Steve1971 wrote:Ya Rob I'm gonna pass on it. But I hope everyone one likes it and enjoys it. I just dont think its worth spending money on an Album that I already have because it has unreleased rehersals on it.

It could just be my frame of mind, but I just can't make myself pass up an FTD. I must admit though that I haven't tried very hard.
Hell, I was even going to offer to buy it for you, but since you've insinuated several times that you're not interested, so be it.

As for me, I'm looking forward to this one more than I have any other in quite awhile.


YOU were going to buy it for me? Ya right. Why do I find it hard to believe and a sick joke? But if you were serious then I hey I'll take it.

:)


Not hard to believe ...

Rob has been generous in the past, giving away CD's.

Rich



Really? Thats pretty cool of Rob to do that for fellow Elvis fans. If he wants to buy me the FTD cd of ROR then I would gladly except it being that I have fallen on hard times money wise. Thats the only reason honestly I'm passing it up. I dont have the funds right now and it sucks. So Rob if your listening I would gladly except the ROR FTD from you and in return if there was anything you ever needed down the road all you would have to do is ask.

:wink:

Sun Jul 15, 2007 5:59 am

FYI - right now he's on vacation:

http://www.elvis-collectors.com/forum/v ... hp?t=30308

But when he returns, good luck to ya :)

Rich

Sun Jul 22, 2007 3:31 pm

:lol: Hey I only heard the 2 cd's COMPLETELY though tonight....and after that i say 100% YES to the question posted on THIS THREAD! BEST release EVER of this years material :lol: