AMAZON.DE A Boy from Tupelo 3 CD Box Set NOW WITH PHOTOS

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Re: AMAZON.DE A Boy from Tupelo 3 CD Box Set NOW WITH PHOTO

Post by A Long Time Fan »

My first post so I thought where better to start than this great set of Elvis' recordings. I bought the original FTD set when it first came out and that truly is a work of art and dedication in pulling it together. However, this works too because it is, how shall I say it - more user friendly. I wont end up with a pulled muscle as I try to lift it off the shelf.

Regarding the chart entries, originally, I did think this would do reasonably well, maybe equalling last years "Down In The Jungle" release, and when it was first announced, I started to think this was going to be Sony/RCA's answer to EMI's Sgt Pepper set but the marketing and promotion seems almost negligible by comparison. A girl I spoke to in my local HMV said they had sold a few copies but it wasn't exactly flying off the shelves so hearing that it sold around 1000 in its first week is I guess a bit disappointing in some ways - certainly nothing to get excited about, neither are the sales from the USA with around 2000. Seems like it is mainly being bought by fans at the moment. And apart from Rolling Stone mag, I have not spotted one newspaper review. At least the Jungle Room release seemed to get a decent amount of press. The price is good for what the buyer gets, but I'm trying to figure out who this set is really aimed at outside of the fan base. I wonder if a 2 disc set would have been better, just concentrating on the masters and the outtakes. Not sure the casual buyer will be interested in some of the "live" stuff, especially as the sound is not top notch.


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Re: AMAZON.DE A Boy from Tupelo 3 CD Box Set NOW WITH PHOTO

Post by drjohncarpenter »

A Long Time Fan wrote:My first post so I thought where better to start than this great set of Elvis' recordings. I bought the original FTD set when it first came out and that truly is a work of art and dedication in pulling it together. However, this works too because it is, how shall I say it - more user friendly. I wont end up with a pulled muscle as I try to lift it off the shelf.

Regarding the chart entries, originally, I did think this would do reasonably well, maybe equalling last years "Down In The Jungle" release, and when it was first announced, I started to think this was going to be Sony/RCA's answer to EMI's Sgt Pepper set but the marketing and promotion seems almost negligible by comparison. A girl I spoke to in my local HMV said they had sold a few copies but it wasn't exactly flying off the shelves so hearing that it sold around 1000 in its first week is I guess a bit disappointing in some ways - certainly nothing to get excited about, neither are the sales from the USA with around 2000. Seems like it is mainly being bought by fans at the moment. And apart from Rolling Stone mag, I have not spotted one newspaper review. At least the Jungle Room release seemed to get a decent amount of press. The price is good for what the buyer gets, but I'm trying to figure out who this set is really aimed at outside of the fan base. I wonder if a 2 disc set would have been better, just concentrating on the masters and the outtakes. Not sure the casual buyer will be interested in some of the "live" stuff, especially as the sound is not top notch.
Nice post. Welcome to FECC! Love your avatar.


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Re: AMAZON.DE A Boy from Tupelo 3 CD Box Set NOW WITH PHOTO

Post by A Long Time Fan »

drjohncarpenter wrote:
A Long Time Fan wrote:My first post so I thought where better to start than this great set of Elvis' recordings. I bought the original FTD set when it first came out and that truly is a work of art and dedication in pulling it together. However, this works too because it is, how shall I say it - more user friendly. I wont end up with a pulled muscle as I try to lift it off the shelf.

Regarding the chart entries, originally, I did think this would do reasonably well, maybe equalling last years "Down In The Jungle" release, and when it was first announced, I started to think this was going to be Sony/RCA's answer to EMI's Sgt Pepper set but the marketing and promotion seems almost negligible by comparison. A girl I spoke to in my local HMV said they had sold a few copies but it wasn't exactly flying off the shelves so hearing that it sold around 1000 in its first week is I guess a bit disappointing in some ways - certainly nothing to get excited about, neither are the sales from the USA with around 2000. Seems like it is mainly being bought by fans at the moment. And apart from Rolling Stone mag, I have not spotted one newspaper review. At least the Jungle Room release seemed to get a decent amount of press. The price is good for what the buyer gets, but I'm trying to figure out who this set is really aimed at outside of the fan base. I wonder if a 2 disc set would have been better, just concentrating on the masters and the outtakes. Not sure the casual buyer will be interested in some of the "live" stuff, especially as the sound is not top notch.
Nice post. Welcome to FECC! Love your avatar.
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Re: AMAZON.DE A Boy from Tupelo 3 CD Box Set NOW WITH PHOTO

Post by YDKM »

:D just got my set and looked through booklet on train to work- amazingly well done and 'great value$$'... pity in 1959 the Indy vault sun tapes were trashed what a loss!~ :shock: :?


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Re: AMAZON.DE A Boy from Tupelo 3 CD Box Set NOW WITH PHOTO

Post by MikeFromHolland »

.
Elvis Presley's 'A Boy From Tupelo' set documents the big bang of rock 'n' roll
By Randy Lewis | August 9, 2017 | Los Angeles Times

Image


The Twitterization of history, and with it, culture, is a trend that deeply worries Ernst Mikael Jorgensen, the Danish music enthusiast and archivist who’s been overseeing Elvis Presley’s recorded legacy since the early 1990s.

“I’m convinced that history needs to be told and retold and retold again,” said Jorgensen, who is retelling a critical part of Presley’s contribution to cultural history with a new box set, “Elvis Presley: A Boy From Tupelo—The Complete 1953-1955 Recordings.”

This latest archival release culls every existing professional recording the King of Rock ’n’ Roll made before he made the jump to RCA Records and became a national, and international, phenomenon in 1956.

For Jorgensen, as well as RCA/Legacy Recordings senior vice president of A&R (artists and repertoire) John Jackson, “A Boy From Tupelo” is one more way to refresh the memories of those who may have forgotten just how monumental Presley’s arrival was more than 60 years ago.

“Stories tend to get shorter and shorter over time to the point where you can’t make sense of them anymore,” said Jorgensen, who chased down elusive outtakes, alternate takes, live recordings as well as radio broadcasts and interviews that Presley made before his career fully blossomed.

He also uncovered hundreds of photos from the period that have never been widely seen, many of them in color. Those are included in a richly detailed 120-page book along with a week-by-week chronology of Presley’s activities that accompanies the three-CD set released on July 28, roughly coinciding with the 40th anniversary of Presley’s death on Aug. 16, 1977.

Image

Today, the reductionist line on Presley, Jorgensen said, is that “Elvis was lucky — that he was in the right place at the right time, that he made cool records in the ’50s, made horrible films in the ’60s and then started taking the wrong medication and died in the ’70s. Reducing it that way, you skip most of what’s really interesting along the way.”

The heart of the new set is all the recordings Presley made with Sun Records founder Sam Phillips at his humble studio at 706 Union Ave. in Memphis. Those works were first gathered and released in album form by RCA in 1976 as “The Sun Sessions.” Here, one will find multiple versions of most of the songs, starting with the original Sun single often referred to as the big bang of rock ’n’ roll, “That’s All Right.”

“When you listen to that track now,” Jackson said in a separate interview, “you have to be reminded of how important, how groundbreaking it was. There was a lot of stuff released right around that time that sounds very similar, but to have that song, in that time, sung by that individual in that studio was one of the most important events of the 20th century. It set the stage for everything that followed.

“It’s hard to put that [record] on for somebody in 2017 and just say, ‘See!’” Jackson continued. “The context and research helps you understand just how bizarre it was for an 18-year-old kid who had just graduated from high school in one of the most segregated cities in the country … walk into a studio, try some ballads that would be safe for his parents to listen to, discover that it’s not really happening and then reveal exactly who he is.”

It might have seemed like Jorgensen and Jackson had bled the well of Presley archival material dry after “The Complete Elvis Presley Masters” 30-CD set in 2010, containing all 711 official recordings Presley made during his 42 years. Then there was last year’s even bigger 60-CD box set, “Elvis Presley—The Album Collection,” which reissued all that material as it was originally released by RCA from 1956 to 1977.

..

Nevertheless, the new set delivers a comprehensive look at everything the Tupelo, Miss., native did en route to leaving fans around the globe all shook up with his RCA releases, which began with the bluesy ballad “Heartbreak Hotel.”

“Everything he did, all the hard work, all he learned from these people he worked with — when he arrives at RCA in 1956, he knows exactly what he wants to do,” Jorgensen said.

“Nobody [at RCA] liked ‘Heartbreak Hotel,’ but he believed in it,” he said. “I’ve spent my life in the record business. If I were just starting out, I wouldn’t have started with ‘Heartbreak Hotel.’”

Yet Presley’s instincts turned out to be right. That debut major-label single shot to No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 and remained there for eight weeks, helping to usher in this new genre called rock ’n’ roll.

For his own research, Jorgensen had to rely on more than just instinct. He placed ads in small-town newspapers throughout the South to root out people who had seen Presley in his early years. He was hoping to find photographs from those shows, or recordings that had not previously surfaced.

“All these people, hundreds of Americans who helped me, came forward with audio, pictures and stories they let me use,” he said. “I love American librarians. Some of them would call their sister, whose best girlfriend went to the show and maybe took some snapshots.”

Jorgensen had assembled a larger version of this project and put out a European only five-CD version in 2012 on his private Follow That Dream label. That set can command $300 or more on eBay, whereas the new “A Boy From Tupelo” can be had for under $30 on some online retailers. There’s also a new vinyl pressing of “The Sun Masters” with the released takes of those 17 songs.

Among the set’s musical finds are restored versions of “That’s All Right” and “Blue Moon of Kentucky,” which were taken from mint condition 45 rpm Sun singles that Jorgensen found in his travels. Previously released versions of those songs have come from copies that RCA made of Phillips’ original Sun tapes, which long ago were destroyed. RCA added echo and other “enhancements” to the Sun versions, the latter of which sound crisper and cleaner than the long-available releases.

The point, he said, is “telling this story in much greater detail than it’s been told before. If nothing else should come through, it’s that we don’t need to go back to ‘Elvis got lucky.’ He didn’t just get lucky. Chuck Berry didn’t just get lucky. Little Richard didn’t just get lucky. They adjusted to a new form of music that wasn’t like any other form of music. They did something original, something that affected everything that came later.

“Yes, they arrived during an environment that was ready for the change,” he said. “You could call it a cultural change even. They arrived at the right time, that’s for sure. But if those three hadn’t arrived when they did, would somebody else have come along in their place? We can speculate on that forever.”
Source: http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/music/la-et-ms-elvis-presley-boy-from-tupelo-40-death-anniversary-20170809-story.html

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Re: AMAZON.DE A Boy from Tupelo 3 CD Box Set NOW WITH PHOTO

Post by Mike C »

MikeFromHolland wrote:.
Elvis Presley's 'A Boy From Tupelo' set documents the big bang of rock 'n' roll
By Randy Lewis | August 9, 2017 | Los Angeles Times

Image


The Twitterization of history, and with it, culture, is a trend that deeply worries Ernst Mikael Jorgensen, the Danish music enthusiast and archivist who’s been overseeing Elvis Presley’s recorded legacy since the early 1990s.

“I’m convinced that history needs to be told and retold and retold again,” said Jorgensen, who is retelling a critical part of Presley’s contribution to cultural history with a new box set, “Elvis Presley: A Boy From Tupelo—The Complete 1953-1955 Recordings.”

This latest archival release culls every existing professional recording the King of Rock ’n’ Roll made before he made the jump to RCA Records and became a national, and international, phenomenon in 1956.

For Jorgensen, as well as RCA/Legacy Recordings senior vice president of A&R (artists and repertoire) John Jackson, “A Boy From Tupelo” is one more way to refresh the memories of those who may have forgotten just how monumental Presley’s arrival was more than 60 years ago.

“Stories tend to get shorter and shorter over time to the point where you can’t make sense of them anymore,” said Jorgensen, who chased down elusive outtakes, alternate takes, live recordings as well as radio broadcasts and interviews that Presley made before his career fully blossomed.

He also uncovered hundreds of photos from the period that have never been widely seen, many of them in color. Those are included in a richly detailed 120-page book along with a week-by-week chronology of Presley’s activities that accompanies the three-CD set released on July 28, roughly coinciding with the 40th anniversary of Presley’s death on Aug. 16, 1977.

Image

Today, the reductionist line on Presley, Jorgensen said, is that “Elvis was lucky — that he was in the right place at the right time, that he made cool records in the ’50s, made horrible films in the ’60s and then started taking the wrong medication and died in the ’70s. Reducing it that way, you skip most of what’s really interesting along the way.”

The heart of the new set is all the recordings Presley made with Sun Records founder Sam Phillips at his humble studio at 706 Union Ave. in Memphis. Those works were first gathered and released in album form by RCA in 1976 as “The Sun Sessions.” Here, one will find multiple versions of most of the songs, starting with the original Sun single often referred to as the big bang of rock ’n’ roll, “That’s All Right.”

“When you listen to that track now,” Jackson said in a separate interview, “you have to be reminded of how important, how groundbreaking it was. There was a lot of stuff released right around that time that sounds very similar, but to have that song, in that time, sung by that individual in that studio was one of the most important events of the 20th century. It set the stage for everything that followed.

“It’s hard to put that [record] on for somebody in 2017 and just say, ‘See!’” Jackson continued. “The context and research helps you understand just how bizarre it was for an 18-year-old kid who had just graduated from high school in one of the most segregated cities in the country … walk into a studio, try some ballads that would be safe for his parents to listen to, discover that it’s not really happening and then reveal exactly who he is.”

It might have seemed like Jorgensen and Jackson had bled the well of Presley archival material dry after “The Complete Elvis Presley Masters” 30-CD set in 2010, containing all 711 official recordings Presley made during his 42 years. Then there was last year’s even bigger 60-CD box set, “Elvis Presley—The Album Collection,” which reissued all that material as it was originally released by RCA from 1956 to 1977.

..

Nevertheless, the new set delivers a comprehensive look at everything the Tupelo, Miss., native did en route to leaving fans around the globe all shook up with his RCA releases, which began with the bluesy ballad “Heartbreak Hotel.”

“Everything he did, all the hard work, all he learned from these people he worked with — when he arrives at RCA in 1956, he knows exactly what he wants to do,” Jorgensen said.

“Nobody [at RCA] liked ‘Heartbreak Hotel,’ but he believed in it,” he said. “I’ve spent my life in the record business. If I were just starting out, I wouldn’t have started with ‘Heartbreak Hotel.’”

Yet Presley’s instincts turned out to be right. That debut major-label single shot to No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 and remained there for eight weeks, helping to usher in this new genre called rock ’n’ roll.

For his own research, Jorgensen had to rely on more than just instinct. He placed ads in small-town newspapers throughout the South to root out people who had seen Presley in his early years. He was hoping to find photographs from those shows, or recordings that had not previously surfaced.

“All these people, hundreds of Americans who helped me, came forward with audio, pictures and stories they let me use,” he said. “I love American librarians. Some of them would call their sister, whose best girlfriend went to the show and maybe took some snapshots.”

Jorgensen had assembled a larger version of this project and put out a European only five-CD version in 2012 on his private Follow That Dream label. That set can command $300 or more on eBay, whereas the new “A Boy From Tupelo” can be had for under $30 on some online retailers. There’s also a new vinyl pressing of “The Sun Masters” with the released takes of those 17 songs.

Among the set’s musical finds are restored versions of “That’s All Right” and “Blue Moon of Kentucky,” which were taken from mint condition 45 rpm Sun singles that Jorgensen found in his travels. Previously released versions of those songs have come from copies that RCA made of Phillips’ original Sun tapes, which long ago were destroyed. RCA added echo and other “enhancements” to the Sun versions, the latter of which sound crisper and cleaner than the long-available releases.

The point, he said, is “telling this story in much greater detail than it’s been told before. If nothing else should come through, it’s that we don’t need to go back to ‘Elvis got lucky.’ He didn’t just get lucky. Chuck Berry didn’t just get lucky. Little Richard didn’t just get lucky. They adjusted to a new form of music that wasn’t like any other form of music. They did something original, something that affected everything that came later.

“Yes, they arrived during an environment that was ready for the change,” he said. “You could call it a cultural change even. They arrived at the right time, that’s for sure. But if those three hadn’t arrived when they did, would somebody else have come along in their place? We can speculate on that forever.”
Source: http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/music/la-et-ms-elvis-presley-boy-from-tupelo-40-death-anniversary-20170809-story.html

.
Good read. Thanks for posting!


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Re: AMAZON.DE A Boy from Tupelo 3 CD Box Set NOW WITH PHOTO

Post by Rich_TCB »

Great article - thanks! Always good to hear from Ernst.


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Re: AMAZON.DE A Boy from Tupelo 3 CD Box Set NOW WITH PHOTO

Post by drjohncarpenter »

Now this is a first-class review. Thanks.


Randy Lewis's site bio is amusing, but also shows his eclecticism:

Randy Lewis
WRITER

Randy Lewis has covered pop music for the Los Angeles Times since 1981, working in that time as a reporter, music critic and editor for the Calendar section. He has interviewed most of the members of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. He's also written first-person accounts of performing the music of Shostakovich and Prokofiev on clarinet and singing Mozart’s Requiem with world-class professionals. In addition, he enjoys belting out "Wooly Bully" in dive bars with his band, the Rounders.

http://www.latimes.com/la-bio-randy-lewis-staff.html

Ernst says some marvelous things in his interview with Randy:

Today, the reductionist line on Presley, Jorgensen said, is that "Elvis was lucky — that he was in the right place at the right time, that he made cool records in the ’50s, made horrible films in the ’60s and then started taking the wrong medication and died in the ’70s. Reducing it that way, you skip most of what’s really interesting along the way."

"I love American librarians."

"If nothing else should come through, it’s that we don’t need to go back to ‘Elvis got lucky.’ He didn’t just get lucky. Chuck Berry didn’t just get lucky. Little Richard didn’t just get lucky. They adjusted to a new form of music that wasn’t like any other form of music. They did something original, something that affected everything that came later."




MikeFromHolland wrote:
Elvis Presley's 'A Boy From Tupelo' set documents the big bang of rock 'n' roll
By Randy Lewis | August 9, 2017 | Los Angeles Times

Image


The Twitterization of history, and with it, culture, is a trend that deeply worries Ernst Mikael Jorgensen, the Danish music enthusiast and archivist who’s been overseeing Elvis Presley’s recorded legacy since the early 1990s.

“I’m convinced that history needs to be told and retold and retold again,” said Jorgensen, who is retelling a critical part of Presley’s contribution to cultural history with a new box set, “Elvis Presley: A Boy From Tupelo—The Complete 1953-1955 Recordings.”

This latest archival release culls every existing professional recording the King of Rock ’n’ Roll made before he made the jump to RCA Records and became a national, and international, phenomenon in 1956.

For Jorgensen, as well as RCA/Legacy Recordings senior vice president of A&R (artists and repertoire) John Jackson, “A Boy From Tupelo” is one more way to refresh the memories of those who may have forgotten just how monumental Presley’s arrival was more than 60 years ago.

“Stories tend to get shorter and shorter over time to the point where you can’t make sense of them anymore,” said Jorgensen, who chased down elusive outtakes, alternate takes, live recordings as well as radio broadcasts and interviews that Presley made before his career fully blossomed.

He also uncovered hundreds of photos from the period that have never been widely seen, many of them in color. Those are included in a richly detailed 120-page book along with a week-by-week chronology of Presley’s activities that accompanies the three-CD set released on July 28, roughly coinciding with the 40th anniversary of Presley’s death on Aug. 16, 1977.

Image

Today, the reductionist line on Presley, Jorgensen said, is that “Elvis was lucky — that he was in the right place at the right time, that he made cool records in the ’50s, made horrible films in the ’60s and then started taking the wrong medication and died in the ’70s. Reducing it that way, you skip most of what’s really interesting along the way.”

The heart of the new set is all the recordings Presley made with Sun Records founder Sam Phillips at his humble studio at 706 Union Ave. in Memphis. Those works were first gathered and released in album form by RCA in 1976 as “The Sun Sessions.” Here, one will find multiple versions of most of the songs, starting with the original Sun single often referred to as the big bang of rock ’n’ roll, “That’s All Right.”

“When you listen to that track now,” Jackson said in a separate interview, “you have to be reminded of how important, how groundbreaking it was. There was a lot of stuff released right around that time that sounds very similar, but to have that song, in that time, sung by that individual in that studio was one of the most important events of the 20th century. It set the stage for everything that followed.

“It’s hard to put that [record] on for somebody in 2017 and just say, ‘See!’” Jackson continued. “The context and research helps you understand just how bizarre it was for an 18-year-old kid who had just graduated from high school in one of the most segregated cities in the country … walk into a studio, try some ballads that would be safe for his parents to listen to, discover that it’s not really happening and then reveal exactly who he is.”

It might have seemed like Jorgensen and Jackson had bled the well of Presley archival material dry after “The Complete Elvis Presley Masters” 30-CD set in 2010, containing all 711 official recordings Presley made during his 42 years. Then there was last year’s even bigger 60-CD box set, “Elvis Presley—The Album Collection,” which reissued all that material as it was originally released by RCA from 1956 to 1977.

..

Nevertheless, the new set delivers a comprehensive look at everything the Tupelo, Miss., native did en route to leaving fans around the globe all shook up with his RCA releases, which began with the bluesy ballad “Heartbreak Hotel.”

“Everything he did, all the hard work, all he learned from these people he worked with — when he arrives at RCA in 1956, he knows exactly what he wants to do,” Jorgensen said.

“Nobody [at RCA] liked ‘Heartbreak Hotel,’ but he believed in it,” he said. “I’ve spent my life in the record business. If I were just starting out, I wouldn’t have started with ‘Heartbreak Hotel.’”

Yet Presley’s instincts turned out to be right. That debut major-label single shot to No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 and remained there for eight weeks, helping to usher in this new genre called rock ’n’ roll.

For his own research, Jorgensen had to rely on more than just instinct. He placed ads in small-town newspapers throughout the South to root out people who had seen Presley in his early years. He was hoping to find photographs from those shows, or recordings that had not previously surfaced.

“All these people, hundreds of Americans who helped me, came forward with audio, pictures and stories they let me use,” he said. “I love American librarians. Some of them would call their sister, whose best girlfriend went to the show and maybe took some snapshots.”

Jorgensen had assembled a larger version of this project and put out a European only five-CD version in 2012 on his private Follow That Dream label. That set can command $300 or more on eBay, whereas the new “A Boy From Tupelo” can be had for under $30 on some online retailers. There’s also a new vinyl pressing of “The Sun Masters” with the released takes of those 17 songs.

Among the set’s musical finds are restored versions of “That’s All Right” and “Blue Moon of Kentucky,” which were taken from mint condition 45 rpm Sun singles that Jorgensen found in his travels. Previously released versions of those songs have come from copies that RCA made of Phillips’ original Sun tapes, which long ago were destroyed. RCA added echo and other “enhancements” to the Sun versions, the latter of which sound crisper and cleaner than the long-available releases.

The point, he said, is “telling this story in much greater detail than it’s been told before. If nothing else should come through, it’s that we don’t need to go back to ‘Elvis got lucky.’ He didn’t just get lucky. Chuck Berry didn’t just get lucky. Little Richard didn’t just get lucky. They adjusted to a new form of music that wasn’t like any other form of music. They did something original, something that affected everything that came later.

“Yes, they arrived during an environment that was ready for the change,” he said. “You could call it a cultural change even. They arrived at the right time, that’s for sure. But if those three hadn’t arrived when they did, would somebody else have come along in their place? We can speculate on that forever.”
Source: http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/music/la-et-ms-elvis-presley-boy-from-tupelo-40-death-anniversary-20170809-story.html


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Re: AMAZON.DE A Boy from Tupelo 3 CD Box Set NOW WITH PHOTO

Post by YDKM »

:D just listened to Disc #3 a FULL 79 minutes running time on 32 tracks. a real 'treat' to hear again- certainly in terms of $ value no one can ever complain about this set in that way!~ :D 8) :lol:


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Re: AMAZON.DE A Boy from Tupelo 3 CD Box Set NOW WITH PHOTO

Post by drghanem »

A question for all you lucky ones who already have the new SONY release of ABFT: Is My Happiness sourced from the recent transfer by Jack White or is it the old transfer from the late 80's or early 90's? I think SONY had time to upgrade this track for the new release.


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Re: AMAZON.DE A Boy from Tupelo 3 CD Box Set NOW WITH PHOTO

Post by Deleted User 1099 »

I've finally gotten around to listening to all three discs. The first one appears to be identical to the original FTD version. The second disc contains twenty-six tracks, as opposed to forty-one on the FTD version. Only one track has been omitted, though, the one with the questionable and revealing comments ("N-word ... that's a pop record now"). In the booklet, this pop record comment is mentioned, and for that reason alone it's a shame it was left on the cutting room floor. At least we have it on the FTD edition, and a couple of other releases as well. Many tracks have been comprised on the new version, meaning that, say, "I Love You Because" is presented over three tracks now as opposed to five previously. Except for the fact that the Mae Boren Axton interview was canned in favor of the only live version of "I Forgot to Remember to Forget", disc three appears to be identical too.

Has the sound quality been improved upon since 2012? I have no idea, but it would be interesting to do a comparison one day when time permits. I only know that this is a helluva package for a more than an affordable price. I've started reading the book/booklet, and it appears to be identical to the original version as far as the text goes. Even though I've read through the material innumerable times during the past decade or so, I still find the subject deeply fascinating.




r&b

Re: AMAZON.DE A Boy from Tupelo 3 CD Box Set NOW WITH PHOTO

Post by r&b »

A Long Time Fan wrote:My first post so I thought where better to start than this great set of Elvis' recordings. I bought the original FTD set when it first came out and that truly is a work of art and dedication in pulling it together. However, this works too because it is, how shall I say it - more user friendly. I wont end up with a pulled muscle as I try to lift it off the shelf.

Regarding the chart entries, originally, I did think this would do reasonably well, maybe equalling last years "Down In The Jungle" release, and when it was first announced, I started to think this was going to be Sony/RCA's answer to EMI's Sgt Pepper set but the marketing and promotion seems almost negligible by comparison. A girl I spoke to in my local HMV said they had sold a few copies but it wasn't exactly flying off the shelves so hearing that it sold around 1000 in its first week is I guess a bit disappointing in some ways - certainly nothing to get excited about, neither are the sales from the USA with around 2000. Seems like it is mainly being bought by fans at the moment. And apart from Rolling Stone mag, I have not spotted one newspaper review. At least the Jungle Room release seemed to get a decent amount of press. The price is good for what the buyer gets, but I'm trying to figure out who this set is really aimed at outside of the fan base. I wonder if a 2 disc set would have been better, just concentrating on the masters and the outtakes. Not sure the casual buyer will be interested in some of the "live" stuff, especially as the sound is not top notch.
This has been already done with the excellent Sunrise release. The majority of the folks that bought that or its follow-up Elvis At Sun (both still available at Amazon) would see no need to buy this. I am talking the general consumer or casual fan. Again, how many times can the label re-issue the same songs and expect big sales? Only for the hardcore as I see it. Do people other than the hardcore fan really need 11 versions of the same song? I love this set but it is not for everyone.




Deleted User 1099

Re: AMAZON.DE A Boy from Tupelo 3 CD Box Set NOW WITH PHOTO

Post by Deleted User 1099 »

I don't agree that Sunrise is an excellent set. The sound quality is too poor for that. Besides, that release contains masters, studio outtakes, and live cuts. Our long time fan is talking about a 2-CD set that only revolves around the studio material, something Sunrise does not.

drghanem, I think the source is the same as before. It says it's a digital copy of the acetate. Jack White is not mentioned in the credits, as far as I can see.



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Re: AMAZON.DE A Boy from Tupelo 3 CD Box Set NOW WITH PHOTO

Post by drjohncarpenter »

Ken Jensen wrote:I don't agree that Sunrise is an excellent set. The sound quality is too poor for that. Besides, that release contains masters, studio outtakes, and live cuts. Our long time fan is talking about a 2-CD set that only revolves around the studio material, something Sunrise does not.

drghanem, I think the source is the same as before. It says it's a digital copy of the acetate. Jack White is not mentioned in the credits, as far as I can see.
The Jack White remaster was not used, but only hardcore audiophiles will note any huge difference. It's a 64 year-old, very well-worn acetate after all.


.
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Re: AMAZON.DE A Boy from Tupelo 3 CD Box Set NOW WITH PHOTO

Post by Mike C »

drjohncarpenter wrote:
Ken Jensen wrote:I don't agree that Sunrise is an excellent set. The sound quality is too poor for that. Besides, that release contains masters, studio outtakes, and live cuts. Our long time fan is talking about a 2-CD set that only revolves around the studio material, something Sunrise does not.

drghanem, I think the source is the same as before. It says it's a digital copy of the acetate. Jack White is not mentioned in the credits, as far as I can see.
The Jack White remaster was not used, but only hardcore audiophiles will note any huge difference. It's a 64 year-old, very well-worn acetate after all.
True, but Alan Stoker did a marvelous job re-transferring it for Jack White.


"You go to school. I'm going out to make a buck!"
Elvis as Danny Fisher


r&b

Re: AMAZON.DE A Boy from Tupelo 3 CD Box Set NOW WITH PHOTO

Post by r&b »

Ken Jensen wrote:I don't agree that Sunrise is an excellent set. The sound quality is too poor for that. Besides, that release contains masters, studio outtakes, and live cuts. Our long time fan is talking about a 2-CD set that only revolves around the studio material, something Sunrise does not.

drghanem, I think the source is the same as before. It says it's a digital copy of the acetate. Jack White is not mentioned in the credits, as far as I can see.
For 60+ year old recordings, the casual fan/listener will not care the sound quality is somewhat inferior on Sunrise.. Sunrise satisfied many a customer that bought it back in the day,( including me), and I assume those people are still satisfied with it. People really need to understand the needs of the average consumer sometimes and not hardcore fans or extreme audio files. It was and still is an excellent representation of Elvis' Sun years for many. Another factor to consider is many people who bought this 2 cd set were getting the Sun stuff on CD for the first time if they passed up the 1992 box King of Rock and Roll. So to them the sound was just find and a major upgrade to their vinyl. I dodnt think there is enough lure to purchase this new 3 CD set if you have Sunrise or Elvis At Sun. Not many people care about a book or a CD of live stuff. Also when Sunrise came out the label was in full command of restoring Elvis' recorded legacy with mainstream releases that made sense. The fabulous 50s, 60s, 70s boxsets, Sunrise, Suspicious Minds, Essential Elvis, and many of his catalog albums with extra cuts. It really should have remained that way. But with Elvis it was always lets re-issue, lets make more money off the fans that simply buy everything, and thus the catalog is a mess with so many releases, a normal consumer gets totally confused. Ugh greed.
Last edited by r&b on Sat Aug 12, 2017 10:14 pm, edited 1 time in total.




Juan Luis

Re: AMAZON.DE A Boy from Tupelo 3 CD Box Set NOW WITH PHOTO

Post by Juan Luis »

Mike C wrote:
drjohncarpenter wrote:
Ken Jensen wrote:I don't agree that Sunrise is an excellent set. The sound quality is too poor for that. Besides, that release contains masters, studio outtakes, and live cuts. Our long time fan is talking about a 2-CD set that only revolves around the studio material, something Sunrise does not.

drghanem, I think the source is the same as before. It says it's a digital copy of the acetate. Jack White is not mentioned in the credits, as far as I can see.
The Jack White remaster was not used, but only hardcore audiophiles will note any huge difference. It's a 64 year-old, very well-worn acetate after all.
True, but Alan Stoker did a marvelous job re-transferring it for Jack White.
And Alan Stoker is credited for additional audio work on this new issue of ABFT.



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Re: AMAZON.DE A Boy from Tupelo 3 CD Box Set NOW WITH PHOTO

Post by OnStage55 »




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Re: AMAZON.DE A Boy from Tupelo 3 CD Box Set NOW WITH PHOTO

Post by Mike C »

Juan Luis wrote:
Mike C wrote:
drjohncarpenter wrote:
Ken Jensen wrote:I don't agree that Sunrise is an excellent set. The sound quality is too poor for that. Besides, that release contains masters, studio outtakes, and live cuts. Our long time fan is talking about a 2-CD set that only revolves around the studio material, something Sunrise does not.

drghanem, I think the source is the same as before. It says it's a digital copy of the acetate. Jack White is not mentioned in the credits, as far as I can see.
The Jack White remaster was not used, but only hardcore audiophiles will note any huge difference. It's a 64 year-old, very well-worn acetate after all.
True, but Alan Stoker did a marvelous job re-transferring it for Jack White.
And Alan Stoker is credited for additional audio work on this new issue of ABFT.
Yes but it is for his work on the Shake, Rattle and Roll acetate from January 19, 1955 - not the My Happiness acetate.


"You go to school. I'm going out to make a buck!"
Elvis as Danny Fisher


Juan Luis

Re: AMAZON.DE A Boy from Tupelo 3 CD Box Set NOW WITH PHOTO

Post by Juan Luis »

Mike C wrote:
Juan Luis wrote:
Mike C wrote:
drjohncarpenter wrote:
Ken Jensen wrote:I don't agree that Sunrise is an excellent set. The sound quality is too poor for that. Besides, that release contains masters, studio outtakes, and live cuts. Our long time fan is talking about a 2-CD set that only revolves around the studio material, something Sunrise does not.

drghanem, I think the source is the same as before. It says it's a digital copy of the acetate. Jack White is not mentioned in the credits, as far as I can see.
The Jack White remaster was not used, but only hardcore audiophiles will note any huge difference. It's a 64 year-old, very well-worn acetate after all.
True, but Alan Stoker did a marvelous job re-transferring it for Jack White.
And Alan Stoker is credited for additional audio work on this new issue of ABFT.
Yes but it is for his work on the Shake, Rattle and Roll acetate from January 19, 1955 - not the My Happiness acetate.
Yes.




Deleted User 1099

Re: AMAZON.DE A Boy from Tupelo 3 CD Box Set NOW WITH PHOTO

Post by Deleted User 1099 »

r&b wrote:
Ken Jensen wrote:I don't agree that Sunrise is an excellent set. The sound quality is too poor for that. Besides, that release contains masters, studio outtakes, and live cuts. Our long time fan is talking about a 2-CD set that only revolves around the studio material, something Sunrise does not.

drghanem, I think the source is the same as before. It says it's a digital copy of the acetate. Jack White is not mentioned in the credits, as far as I can see.
For 60+ year old recordings, the casual fan/listener will not care the sound quality is somewhat inferior on Sunrise.. Sunrise satisfied many a customer that bought it back in the day,( including me), and I assume those people are still satisfied with it. People really need to understand the needs of the average consumer sometimes and not hardcore fans or extreme audio files. It was and still is an excellent representation of Elvis' Sun years for many. Another factor to consider is many people who bought this 2 cd set were getting the Sun stuff on CD for the first time if they passed up the 1992 box King of Rock and Roll. So to them the sound was just find and a major upgrade to their vinyl. I dodnt think there is enough lure to purchase this new 3 CD set if you have Sunrise or Elvis At Sun. Not many people care about a book or a CD of live stuff. Also when Sunrise came out the label was in full command of restoring Elvis' recorded legacy with mainstream releases that made sense. The fabulous 50s, 60s, 70s boxsets, Sunrise, Suspicious Minds, Essential Elvis, and many of his catalog albums with extra cuts. It really should have remained that way. But with Elvis it was always lets re-issue, lets make more money off the fans that simply buy everything, and thus the catalog is a mess with so many releases, a normal consumer gets totally confused. Ugh greed.
Greed has got nothing to do with it. When Ernst published his book in 2012, it was planned to include every single scrap of surviving audio from the SUN years in the best possible sound quality. Can you imagine how excited Ernst must have been when he came across a concert tape from 1955 with "You're a Heartbreaker" on it and a second version of "Hearts of Stone", plus four other songs, including a mislabelled version of "That's All Right (Little Mama)", and then discovering that there was no mistake after all, that, in fact, he has unearthed a brand new Elvis song? My God, that must have been mind-blowing!

The three CDs that accompanied the book were a treasure trove, and it stands to reason that they would find their way to the mass market. It's not just about maximizing on the investment, it's just as much a matter of making available to the general public a vital piece of music history. And, yes, I think there's a market for it.




Deleted User 1099

Re: AMAZON.DE A Boy from Tupelo 3 CD Box Set NOW WITH PHOTO

Post by Deleted User 1099 »

There's a very interesting picture on page 18 in the booklet. Close scrutiny will reveal the number of girls Elvis was with that evening, either that or there had been a massive orgy in the parking lot during the show.

However, the most likely explanation is that the drug store handed out freebies in connection to their grand opening.




The Pirate

Re: AMAZON.DE A Boy from Tupelo 3 CD Box Set NOW WITH PHOTO

Post by The Pirate »

Ken Jensen wrote:There's a very interesting picture on page 18 in the booklet. Close scrutiny will reveal the number of girls Elvis was with that evening, either that or there had been a massive orgy in the parking lot during the show.

However, the most likely explanation is that the drug store handed out freebies in connection to their grand opening.
The drug store's grand opening, or the girls' grand opening? I'm going out shortly, I need an answer on this pretty quick. Otherwise I won't be able to concentrate while I'm driving.



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Re: AMAZON.DE A Boy from Tupelo 3 CD Box Set NOW WITH PHOTO

Post by drghanem »

Contrary to what posters here might say about the fidelity on the old vs the new transfer of My Happiness, I personally hear a remarkable difference in clarity. Of course the new Jack White-transfer comes with surface-noice but the clarity is unsurpassed in quality. Too bad that SONY didn't use it for this new set. I am still awaiting my set which was shipped from the good ole USA last week.


"I´m limp as a rag, worn out when a show´s over". Elvis in Tacoma, fall 1957.
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Re: AMAZON.DE A Boy from Tupelo 3 CD Box Set NOW WITH PHOTO

Post by JimmyCool »

drghanem wrote:Contrary to what posters here might say about the fidelity on the old vs the new transfer of My Happiness, I personally hear a remarkable difference in clarity. Of course the new Jack White-transfer comes with surface-noice but the clarity is unsurpassed in quality. Too bad that SONY didn't use it for this new set. I am still awaiting my set which was shipped from the good ole USA last week.
I agree; the 2012 remasters of the first two demo acetates sound worse than ever to me (badly filtered/noise reduced), so it's the only thing I really dislike from these almost perfect 2012/2017 sets...
I would love to hear nice and fresh transfers from these demo acetates in digital form.


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