A Craze Called Elvis (1956 article)

Sun Apr 13, 2014 12:51 am

A Craze Called Elvis
by Carlton Brown
Coronet, September 1956
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Re: A Craze Called Elvis (1956 article)

Sun Apr 13, 2014 12:52 am

And the last page...
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Re: A Craze Called Elvis (1956 article)

Sun Apr 13, 2014 3:56 am

Thanks for the scans !

Interesting to see this article signed by (Robert) Carlton Brown, the journalist who interviewed Elvis at the Warwick Hotel on March 24, 1956.

Some of the quotes in the article sound familiar, especially the one about "somebody beatin' on a bucket lid" in reference to his first recording.

Re: A Craze Called Elvis (1956 article)

Sun Apr 13, 2014 10:57 am

That's nice, thank you, the fool.

A surprisingly accurate article but, as always, I could do without the Southern accent affectations.

Re: A Craze Called Elvis (1956 article)

Sun Apr 13, 2014 11:56 am

George Smith wrote:(...) I could do without the Southern accent affectations.


I agree. That's annoying, and it seems like it was pretty recurrent among those journalists.

And it's laughable, I think. Who did they think they were, anyway ? William Shakespeare ?

Re: A Craze Called Elvis (1956 article)

Mon Jun 02, 2014 3:00 pm

Good stuff as usual, The Fool.

Re: A Craze Called Elvis (1956 article)

Mon Jun 02, 2014 11:02 pm

George Smith wrote:That's nice, thank you, the fool.

A surprisingly accurate article but, as always, I could do without the Southern accent affectations.


Discredited Presley biographer Albert Goldman picked up on this nasty contrivance when "quoting" anyone from the South, especially Elvis or close members of his family. It infers a superiority on the part of the writer, and implies something below average about the subject, either socially, economically, educationally, or a combination of all three. It's unfortunate to learn (Robert) Carlton Brown was no different in that respect.

Otherwise the article is interesting in that Elvis and his music are not otherwise denigrated. One wonders if the March 24, 1956 NY interview is the foundation for this Coronet magazine piece, as nothing in it goes beyond early June. Oh, my heart did hurt a tad when I read this line, though: "In England, the release of 'Heartbreak Hotel' this May stirred up such a clamor that British agents have begun negotiations for a Presley stand at the London Palladium in 1957." I have no reason to doubt the veracity of this comment, and it is so sad to imagine such a booking was never done.

Also, anyone notice how prescient the article is? It is eerie to read of Elvis' 30-pound weight gain in the space of a year, being a road warrior, doing tons of shows, night after night, or that he has trouble sleeping, getting no more than 4 hours at a time, and worries if his success will disappear. All of these events are equally true in the 1970s.

Thanks again for the share!