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Re: Grace Kelly stands up for black artists - 1956

Sat Apr 12, 2014 11:04 am

Mister Moon wrote:
luckyjackson1 wrote:Thanks for posting, especially that one:
Grace%20Kelly%20Jamaica%201955.jpg
:smt007 :smt007 :smt007


Amazing Grace !

This sums it up perfectly.

Re: Grace Kelly stands up for black artists - 1956

Sat Apr 12, 2014 5:32 pm

Awesome thanks.

Re: Grace Kelly stands up for black artists - 1956

Sat Apr 12, 2014 6:11 pm

ElvisLife wrote:Awesome thanks.


You're welcome, ElvisLife !

Re: Grace Kelly stands up for black artists - 1956

Tue Apr 22, 2014 2:51 am

A couple more from the same series...

Grace Kelly Jamaica 1955g.jpg


Kelly Conant 55 b.jpg
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Re: Grace Kelly stands up for black artists - 1956

Tue Apr 22, 2014 3:12 am

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Grace Kelly Off To Monaco - Footage captured Wednesday, April 4, 1956. New York, Pier 84.

Re: Grace Kelly stands up for black artists - 1956

Fri May 30, 2014 11:02 pm

More Grace photos from that trip :

Kelly x.jpg


Kelly z.jpg


Kelly n.jpg
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Re: Grace Kelly stands up for black artists - 1956

Fri May 30, 2014 11:08 pm

Another video (partially) about the departure :

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And a newsreel of the arrival to Monaco :

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Re: Grace Kelly stands up for black artists - 1956

Sat Oct 18, 2014 11:21 pm

Today I'm on a Grace Kelly kick, as I have purchased "Dial M For Murder" on DVD. I will probably watch it tomorrow.

And as we are getting closer to what would have been Grace's 85th. birthday (November 12), let's get this cool topic revived with another nice photo.

Dig those gloves ! :


Kelly mag.jpg
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Re: Grace Kelly stands up for black artists - 1956

Tue Feb 24, 2015 12:36 am

Go, Grace, go !


560330 a.JPG



560330 b.jpg
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Re: Grace Kelly stands up for black artists - 1956

Fri Feb 27, 2015 12:05 am

Another image from the travel :


img0096B (2).jpg
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Re: Grace Kelly stands up for black artists - 1956

Fri Feb 27, 2015 12:53 am

Mister Moon wrote:Today I'm on a Grace Kelly kick, as I have purchased "Dial M For Murder" on DVD. I will probably watch it tomorrow.

And as we are getting closer to what would have been Grace's 85th. birthday (November 12), let's get this cool topic revived with another nice photo.

Dig those gloves ! :

Kelly mag.jpg


I watched the Blu-ray of Dial M for Murder a few weeks ago and saw it on the big screen in 3D last year. It's a superb movie. Quite underrated in some ways, but I love the performances, stately pace and Hitchcock's direction. His framing and composition was keen as mustard here, but it's the intricacies that makes this movie fascinating. This, and John Williams' wonderful performance as the Chief Inspector. He's almost like a prototype for Columbo. And Grace Kelly is just sublime, of course.

Re: Grace Kelly stands up for black artists - 1956

Fri Feb 27, 2015 2:56 pm

Greystoke wrote:
Mister Moon wrote:Today I'm on a Grace Kelly kick, as I have purchased "Dial M For Murder" on DVD. I will probably watch it tomorrow.

And as we are getting closer to what would have been Grace's 85th. birthday (November 12), let's get this cool topic revived with another nice photo.

Dig those gloves ! :

Kelly mag.jpg


I watched the Blu-ray of Dial M for Murder a few weeks ago and saw it on the big screen in 3D last year. It's a superb movie. Quite underrated in some ways, but I love the performances, stately pace and Hitchcock's direction. His framing and composition was keen as mustard here, but it's the intricacies that makes this movie fascinating. This, and John Williams' wonderful performance as the Chief Inspector. He's almost like a prototype for Columbo. And Grace Kelly is just sublime, of course.


Yes, John Williams is always a delight to watch. He also appeared in several episodes of Hitchcock's TV series, in one of them portraying a killer, which is a bit shocking as one tends to think of him as the nice gentleman we see in "Dial M For Murder", for example.

And I agree that he's something of a pre-Columbo in that movie. He never lets up, until he finds the key (pun intended !) to the mystery !

Thanks !

Re: Grace Kelly stands up for black artists - 1956

Fri Feb 27, 2015 2:59 pm

Another nice photo for the collection :


GRACE KELLY WAVES GOOD-BYE FROM DECK OF LINER.

Actress leaves New York for her wedding to Prince Rainier.



Grace x.jpg



Grace y.jpg
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Re: Grace Kelly stands up for black artists - 1956

Fri Feb 27, 2015 3:23 pm

And another one, from "Life" magazine :


Grace dogs.jpg
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Re: Grace Kelly stands up for black artists - 1956

Sun Mar 08, 2015 8:45 pm

This is a better version of one of the photos posted in page one of this topic :


Grace a.jpg
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Re: Grace Kelly stands up for black artists - 1956

Sun Mar 08, 2015 10:20 pm

It seems that celebrities started pushing home the race issue in the 1950s, and making noise about it. For example, the following is from a Sinatra interview and included on the Sinatra: Vegas set.

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Perhaps the big unsung hero in this regard, though, was jazz impresario and Ella Fitzgerald's manager, Norman Granz, who did a great deal to fight for equality both for black musicians and for audiences. Geoffrey Mark Fidelman writes in his biography of Fitzgerald how Granz refused to have any of his musicians play for segregated audiences, and there was a clause in all his concert contracts that demanded equality in the selling of tickets and seating. If the clause was broken, everyone got paid but no-one performed. When Fitzgerald and her musicians were refused first class seating on an airline in 1953, Granz sued the airline, winning a large out of court settlement.

When Ella was due to appear on the Bell Telephone Hour TV show in 1959, the sponsors objected to Ella having her band made up of both black and white musicians. In the end, the performance took place with the band out of sight. Granz took out a two-page advert in Variety which included the following:

"I submit that [NBC] concern itself with the principles of human rights and human dignities rather than the fixing of quiz shows. They must concern themselves with sponsors' policies which foster racial prejudice - the worst kind of prejudice in America. It isn't even a question, as is often put, of the eyes of the world upon us; it's simply respect for our fellow man..."

Re: Grace Kelly stands up for black artists - 1956

Sun Mar 08, 2015 10:56 pm

Thanks for this beautiful post, poormadpeter.

The Sinatra recording is priceless, thank you. I see this is included as a bonus track for a 1961 live recording. Is this a 1961 interview too ?

Also, very interesting to read about Norman Granz and his fight against racism.

Another remarkable example of celebrities breaking racial barriers would be that of Artie Shaw hiring Billie Holiday as a singer for his orchestra in 1938. By most accounts, Shaw did not enjoy interviews and the like, and after he retired from music he lived a pretty reclusive life. But I once saw a Billie Holiday documentary where several related people spoke about her, and one of them was Shaw. I can't check the exact quote, but he explained the difficulties they found when they played certain places, like the Southern states. Once, during a concert, there was a member of the audience who kept insulting and bothering Billie. Shaw was directing the orchestra, and could see how she was gradually changing the look in her face and, literally, getting about to explode. Then, during an instrumental passage, or maybe in between songs, Billie walked to the edge of the stage, got closer to the guy and told him "motherf***er!". The guy turned pale, and walked away from the stage.

Thanks again !

Re: Grace Kelly stands up for black artists - 1956

Sun Mar 08, 2015 11:07 pm

I think this newsreel is not included in the previous uploads in this thread :


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Re: Grace Kelly stands up for black artists - 1956

Sun Mar 08, 2015 11:53 pm

With her parents, during the same trip :


Grace parents.jpg
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Re: Grace Kelly stands up for black artists - 1956

Mon Mar 09, 2015 12:13 am

Mister Moon wrote:Thanks for this beautiful post, poormadpeter.

The Sinatra recording is priceless, thank you. I see this is included as a bonus track for a 1961 live recording. Is this a 1961 interview too ?

Also, very interesting to read about Norman Granz and his fight against racism.

Another remarkable example of celebrities breaking racial barriers would be that of Artie Shaw hiring Billie Holiday as a singer for his orchestra in 1938. By most accounts, Shaw did not enjoy interviews and the like, and after he retired from music he lived a pretty reclusive life. But I once saw a Billie Holiday documentary where several related people spoke about her, and one of them was Shaw. I can't check the exact quote, but he explained the difficulties they found when they played certain places, like the Southern states. Once, during a concert, there was a member of the audience who kept insulting and bothering Billie. Shaw was directing the orchestra, and could see how she was gradually changing the look in her face and, literally, getting about to explode. Then, during an instrumental passage, or maybe in between songs, Billie walked to the edge of the stage, got closer to the guy and told him "motherf***er!". The guy turned pale, and walked away from the stage.

Thanks again !


That sounds like Billie Holiday! As for the Sinatra recording, no date is given in the booklet for the boxed set - I think it might be later than 1961, going by the sound of his voice, but I may be mistaken. Greystoke may well know the answer!

Re: Grace Kelly stands up for black artists - 1956

Mon Mar 09, 2015 5:32 pm

poormadpeter wrote:
Mister Moon wrote:Thanks for this beautiful post, poormadpeter.

The Sinatra recording is priceless, thank you. I see this is included as a bonus track for a 1961 live recording. Is this a 1961 interview too ?

Also, very interesting to read about Norman Granz and his fight against racism.

Another remarkable example of celebrities breaking racial barriers would be that of Artie Shaw hiring Billie Holiday as a singer for his orchestra in 1938. By most accounts, Shaw did not enjoy interviews and the like, and after he retired from music he lived a pretty reclusive life. But I once saw a Billie Holiday documentary where several related people spoke about her, and one of them was Shaw. I can't check the exact quote, but he explained the difficulties they found when they played certain places, like the Southern states. Once, during a concert, there was a member of the audience who kept insulting and bothering Billie. Shaw was directing the orchestra, and could see how she was gradually changing the look in her face and, literally, getting about to explode. Then, during an instrumental passage, or maybe in between songs, Billie walked to the edge of the stage, got closer to the guy and told him "motherf***er!". The guy turned pale, and walked away from the stage.

Thanks again !


That sounds like Billie Holiday! As for the Sinatra recording, no date is given in the booklet for the boxed set - I think it might be later than 1961, going by the sound of his voice, but I may be mistaken. Greystoke may well know the answer!


I think this is an excerpt from Frank's interview with Arlene Francis in 1981.

Re: Grace Kelly stands up for black artists - 1956

Mon Mar 09, 2015 5:37 pm

Greystoke wrote:
poormadpeter wrote:
Mister Moon wrote:Thanks for this beautiful post, poormadpeter.

The Sinatra recording is priceless, thank you. I see this is included as a bonus track for a 1961 live recording. Is this a 1961 interview too ?

Also, very interesting to read about Norman Granz and his fight against racism.

Another remarkable example of celebrities breaking racial barriers would be that of Artie Shaw hiring Billie Holiday as a singer for his orchestra in 1938. By most accounts, Shaw did not enjoy interviews and the like, and after he retired from music he lived a pretty reclusive life. But I once saw a Billie Holiday documentary where several related people spoke about her, and one of them was Shaw. I can't check the exact quote, but he explained the difficulties they found when they played certain places, like the Southern states. Once, during a concert, there was a member of the audience who kept insulting and bothering Billie. Shaw was directing the orchestra, and could see how she was gradually changing the look in her face and, literally, getting about to explode. Then, during an instrumental passage, or maybe in between songs, Billie walked to the edge of the stage, got closer to the guy and told him "motherf***er!". The guy turned pale, and walked away from the stage.

Thanks again !


That sounds like Billie Holiday! As for the Sinatra recording, no date is given in the booklet for the boxed set - I think it might be later than 1961, going by the sound of his voice, but I may be mistaken. Greystoke may well know the answer!


I think this is an excerpt from Frank's interview with Arlene Francis in 1981.


Thanks, Greystoke !

Re: Grace Kelly stands up for black artists - 1956

Sat Aug 01, 2015 7:18 pm

Let's revive this thread with this photo of Grace reading Louis Armstrong's 1954 autobiography. This image was taken during the making of "High Society", in early 1956. Armstrong was featured in the movie singing a duet with Bing Crosby. Note that the photo appears to have been taken in front on Frank Sinatra's dressing room.


Grace Satchmo.jpg



Satchmo.jpg
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Re: Grace Kelly stands up for black artists - 1956

Sun Aug 02, 2015 9:17 pm

Louis was great in High Society, although his role was small, like always, he brought lots of personality to the screen. He appeared in more movies than some may think, mostly playing himself, or a musician similar to himself, but he's always a delight to see and hear. Grace Kelly was quite wonderful in High Society, of course.

Re: Grace Kelly stands up for black artists - 1956

Sun Aug 02, 2015 9:57 pm

Greystoke wrote:Louis was great in High Society, although his role was small, like always, he brought lots of personality to the screen. He appeared in more movies than some may think, mostly playing himself, or a musician similar to himself, but he's always a delight to see and hear. Grace Kelly was quite wonderful in High Society, of course.


Yes, I remember his spot on "The Glenn Miller Story" from two years earlier. Gene Krupa was also featured in the same scene. Incidentally, I recently saw "The Benny Goodman Story" (1956) for the first time. It's also a very entertaining and engaging movie, with lots of great music too. This movie did not feature Armstrong, but it had another legendary New Orleans musician, Kid Ory, as well as tons of other jazz legends, such as Krupa again, Teddy Wilson, Lionel Hampton, etc. This movie prompted me to search for Goodman's concert at the Carnegie Hall (1938) on CD, but I've yet to find the time to listen to it properly.

Thanks for your post !