Chat talk and light discussion

Re: last movie you watched

Thu Jan 30, 2014 8:09 pm

Not watched anything lately but I bought the blu-ray version of Stand By Me at the weekend. I haven't seen it for years but it is one of my favourites..must go down as an all time classic.

I'm going to try and watch it at the weekend if the weans will give me peace.

Re: last movie you watched

Thu Jan 30, 2014 8:14 pm

daylon wrote:Not watched anything lately but I bought the blu-ray version of Stand By Me at the weekend. I haven't seen it for years but it is one of my favourites..must go down as an all time classic.

I'm going to try and watch it at the weekend if the weans will give me peace.



Stand by me is a classic ! you will love it on blu-ray and the special features are very cool too !!!

Re: last movie you watched

Fri Jan 31, 2014 2:30 pm

I saw Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit and Out of the Furnace at the cinema yesterday. The former, directed by Kenneth Branagh, and starring Chris Pine, Keira Knightley, Kevin Costner and Branagh, himself, as the chief villain. This is the first Jack Ryan film since The Sum of All Fears in 2002, which starred Ben Affleck; this, however, is an origins story, with Ryan, a former marine turned CIA analyst after a major accident in Afghanistan. Ryan, prompted into action after the events of 9/11 is quite literally starting from Ground Zero as we see him some years later in his new role heading towards Wall Street. The story is timely enough, with notions of a Russian terrorist organisation aiming to demolish the US economy, both figuratively and literally. Ryan, coached by a mentor in the shape of Kevin Costner’s Harper, and trying to juggle the concerns of his former nurse-turned-fiancé, played by Keira Knightley, soon find himself on the field and in Moscow trying to resolve what he initially thinks can be done with his analytical mind, not lifting a gun. Given the setting and broad treatment of the Russian villains, or “baddies,” given how they’re played, Jack Ryan; Shadow Recruit very much harks back to the Cold War inspired thrillers of the 1980s, although the influence of the Jason Bourne movies is clearly present here, also. Pine is very good as Ryan, playing the character close to his chest as he engages in action scenes with smarts and wide-eyed concern given that he’s playing a fish out of water here. Costner, who I’ve always liked, brings a quiet authority to his role and helps add a touch of gravitas to an otherwise breezy action film. An action film that’s clever and well directed by Branagh, who seems to be relish in his role, especially playing coy next to Knightley, whose character, on the suspicion of Ryan having an affair, ends up in Russia and in the general melee as notion of True Lies are also conjured up. There’s some great action set-pieces here, and although the overall standard doesn’t match the Bourne films or the best of the recent James Bond or Mission Impossible movies, this is an entertaining and occasionally intense movie that succeeds quite amiably throughout.

Out of the Furnace is Scott Cooper’s second film as director after the praise and success of Crazy Heart, in 2009. Like Crazy Heart, this is very much a character study and boasts a fine array of actors on splendid form. The story, of two brothers, played by Christian Bale and Casey Affleck, centres around Affleck’s inability to adjust to society after serving in Iraq. He’s drawn into the world of bare knuckle fighting, much to the dismay of his elder brother, who wants him to work in the local foundry. Filmed in Pennsylvania, Out of the Furnace both looks and feels quite similar to The Deer Hunter, although we never leave home soil. Cooper, who also wrote the screenplay, uses the characters as emblems of society making their purpose relevant to a bigger picture both within and out with the narrative -- Bale is symbolic of hard work and decency, Affleck, disillusionment and anger, whilst Willem Defoe and Woody Harrelson, who play a small-time money-lender and a backwoods gangster, are representative of Wall Street and Government and how they can dictate the lives of ordinary people. The results are quite compelling during the first two-thirds of the film, with Bale attached to an underused Zoe Saldana and a turn of events fracturing both his love life and family life. Themes of family and brotherhood are also strong here, and whilst the film steps assuredly and moves at a stately pace, the final act veers into more conventional territory and undoes much of the underlying tension by changing gears and becoming a film of a different nature. Which is quite unfortunate, because there’s much to admire in Out of the Furnace, not least of all Christian Bale in a performance the equivalent of anything he’s done recently. Casey Affleck is very good at brining anger and a boiling pot mentality to his roles, and does so superbly in this film. Forest Whitaker is also among the cast, with one of the smaller roles as a town sheriff; Whitaker is usually reliable and is no less than such here. Woody Harrelson is also very good, although the initial introduction to his character establishes the type of man he is, this first scene is also at odds with the better aspects of the film. Recommended, though; with some reservations of the denouement, but great acting and solid direction throughout.

Re: last movie you watched

Fri Jan 31, 2014 5:20 pm

The China Syndrome (1979) Jack Lemmon, Jane Fonda.

Re: last movie you watched

Fri Jan 31, 2014 8:21 pm

greystoke wrote:I saw Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit and Out of the Furnace at the cinema yesterday. The former, directed by Kenneth Branagh, and starring Chris Pine, Keira Knightley, Kevin Costner and Branagh, himself, as the chief villain. This is the first Jack Ryan film since The Sum of All Fears in 2002, which starred Ben Affleck; this, however, is an origins story, with Ryan, a former marine turned CIA analyst after a major accident in Afghanistan. Ryan, prompted into action after the events of 9/11 is quite literally starting from Ground Zero as we see him some years later in his new role heading towards Wall Street. The story is timely enough, with notions of a Russian terrorist organisation aiming to demolish the US economy, both figuratively and literally. Ryan, coached by a mentor in the shape of Kevin Costner’s Harper, and trying to juggle the concerns of his former nurse-turned-fiancé, played by Keira Knightley, soon find himself on the field and in Moscow trying to resolve what he initially thinks can be done with his analytical mind, not lifting a gun. Given the setting and broad treatment of the Russian villains, or “baddies,” given how they’re played, Jack Ryan; Shadow Recruit very much harks back to the Cold War inspired thrillers of the 1980s, although the influence of the Jason Bourne movies is clearly present here, also. Pine is very good as Ryan, playing the character close to his chest as he engages in action scenes with smarts and wide-eyed concern given that he’s playing a fish out of water here. Costner, who I’ve always liked, brings a quiet authority to his role and helps add a touch of gravitas to an otherwise breezy action film. An action film that’s clever and well directed by Branagh, who seems to be relish in his role, especially playing coy next to Knightley, whose character, on the suspicion of Ryan having an affair, ends up in Russia and in the general melee as notion of True Lies are also conjured up. There’s some great action set-pieces here, and although the overall standard doesn’t match the Bourne films or the best of the recent James Bond or Mission Impossible movies, this is an entertaining and occasionally intense movie that succeeds quite amiably throughout.

Out of the Furnace is Scott Cooper’s second film as director after the praise and success of Crazy Heart, in 2009. Like Crazy Heart, this is very much a character study and boasts a fine array of actors on splendid form. The story, of two brothers, played by Christian Bale and Casey Affleck, centres around Affleck’s inability to adjust to society after serving in Iraq. He’s drawn into the world of bare knuckle fighting, much to the dismay of his elder brother, who wants him to work in the local foundry. Filmed in Pennsylvania, Out of the Furnace both looks and feels quite similar to The Deer Hunter, although we never leave home soil. Cooper, who also wrote the screenplay, uses the characters as emblems of society making their purpose relevant to a bigger picture both within and out with the narrative -- Bale is symbolic of hard work and decency, Affleck, disillusionment and anger, whilst Willem Defoe and Woody Harrelson, who play a small-time money-lender and a backwoods gangster, are representative of Wall Street and Government and how they can dictate the lives of ordinary people. The results are quite compelling during the first two-thirds of the film, with Bale attached to an underused Zoe Saldana and a turn of events fracturing both his love life and family life. Themes of family and brotherhood are also strong here, and whilst the film steps assuredly and moves at a stately pace, the final act veers into more conventional territory and undoes much of the underlying tension by changing gears and becoming a film of a different nature. Which is quite unfortunate, because there’s much to admire in Out of the Furnace, not least of all Christian Bale in a performance the equivalent of anything he’s done recently. Casey Affleck is very good at brining anger and a boiling pot mentality to his roles, and does so superbly in this film. Forest Whitaker is also among the cast, with one of the smaller roles as a town sheriff; Whitaker is usually reliable and is no less than such here. Woody Harrelson is also very good, although the initial introduction to his character establishes the type of man he is, this first scene is also at odds with the better aspects of the film. Recommended, though; with some reservations of the denouement, but great acting and solid direction throughout.



Thankyou for the reviews :smt023

Re: last movie you watched

Sat Feb 01, 2014 4:41 pm

I also watched Filth and concur with views here, I so wanted to like this film but found it completely uninvolving, have not read the book so cant compare the two but an audience must have some empathy at some level with the characters to get into a movie, here it was sadly devoid of such.
On the other hand I also seen Dallas Buyers Club and found it a very powerful film with direction and acting at the very top of the game. Mathew McConaughey's performance easily the best Ive seen in some time from any actor, sorry Leo, it has to be in the bag.[never thought I'd say those words about a rom com king] Also an honourable mention has to be said of Jared Leto, a truly wonderful return to the big screen.

Re: last movie you watched

Sun Feb 02, 2014 1:17 pm

Went to see The Wolf of Wall Street at the cinema yeaterday,as a one off watch it was a good movie as far as the story goes well over the top.Leonardo DiCaprio was amazing as always.the downside (for me)i hated the main character Jordan Belfort now i don't mind people doing well for themselfs in life,but if everything this guy did thats in the movie is true then i just can not relate to the character,he stole from working class people and became rich and out of contol and the more i watched the more irritated i became.would i buy this movie to keep no,would i watch it again no,but as a one off movie worth watching for an eye opener to see how higher up people deal with our money or even run our country.

Re: last movie you watched

Sun Feb 02, 2014 2:19 pm

rocknroller wrote:Went to see The Wolf of Wall Street at the cinema yeaterday,as a one off watch it was a good movie as far as the story goes well over the top.Leonardo DiCaprio was amazing as always.the downside (for me)i hated the main character Jordan Belfort now i don't mind people doing well for themselfs in life,but if everything this guy did thats in the movie is true then i just can not relate to the character,he stole from working class people and became rich and out of contol and the more i watched the more irritated i became.would i buy this movie to keep no,would i watch it again no,but as a one off movie worth watching for an eye opener to see how higher up people deal with our money or even run our country.


I think an inability to find a way to really empathise with Jordan Belfort, or at least get on his side, is one if the few drawbacks in The Wolf of Wall Street. I liked it very much, incidentally, but you're absolutely right, rocknroller. Di Caprio is sensational here, of course; it's one of his best performances, in my opinion. But we never see the other side of his actions -- the ramifications on those whom he scams, and whose voices we only occasionally hear. There isn't much in the way of remorse, either, which begs the question of whether this really is a cautionary tale, or a film that revels in the excess shown. There's also a slight air of misogyny, although I would like to think this isn't deliberate. Scorsese depicts a man's world, and other than Joanna Lumley, who was very good here, the female roles are both limited and dubious when, near the end, a co-worker who is said to have been very important for the company and having been there from the start, was totally new to my eyes within the narrative. Perhaps I missed her earlier in the film, but this was a token nod among hookers and strippers. I thought Margot Robbie, who played Belfort's second wife, was very good in her role, though. She's gorgeous and captivating on screen, but brings more than great looks; she plays smart and has tons of personality. I also thought she was good in About Time, Richard Curtis' most recent film.

Re: last movie you watched

Sun Feb 02, 2014 2:40 pm

jak wrote:This was tonight's film of choice. A very good but somewhat depressing film I thought. Once again Cate Blanchett delivers a great performance. I will watch any film she stars in as she never disappoints. She is one of the absolute best. All the performances in this film were top notch by a great cast.


I thought Blue Jasmine was quite splendid, both as a character study and a satire on the financial crisis. It's Woody Allen at his finest, in my opinion, and Cate Blanchett on exceptional form. She's my pick for Best Actress at the Oscars this year; and has been since I saw the film. Sally Hawkins is also superb, whilst Alec Baldwin once again nailed the kind of unscrupulous character he's so adept at playing. A big surprise to me, however, was Andrew Dice Clay, an actor whom I've never give more than a second thought to. He brought genuine pathos and a strong sense of understanding to his role. Blue Jasmine a great looking film, also; whilst the soundtrack is near perfect, in my opinion. There are shades of A Streetcar Named Desire here, but this isn't a drawback or a concern when there's such excellence on screen.

Re: last movie you watched

Sun Feb 02, 2014 5:56 pm

jak wrote:"I thought Blue Jasmine was quite splendid, both as a character study and a satire on the financial crisis. It's Woody Allen at his finest, in my opinion, and Cate Blanchett on exceptional form. She's my pick for Best Actress at the Oscars this year; and has been since I saw the film. Sally Hawkins is also superb, whilst Alec Baldwin once again nailed the kind of unscrupulous character he's so adept at playing. A big surprise to me, however, was Andrew Dice Clay, an actor whom I've never give more than a second thought to. He brought genuine pathos and a strong sense of understanding to his role. Blue Jasmine a great looking film, also; whilst the soundtrack is near perfect, in my opinion. There are shades of A Streetcar Named Desire here, but this isn't a drawback or a concern when there's such excellence on screen."

Totally agree. I wish Clay would have had more time on screen. I think he surprised many people with this performance. Hopefully we will see more of him as a result.
I have a question for you Greystoke. What are you're thoughts on the ending of the film? Were you sympathetic to the character in spite of her flaws?


I was sympathetic to her; she's a flawed character, and a character used to a certain lifestyle. But she's wounded, disillusioned and desperately out of her element. She was also very vulnerable and despite her callous facade, I didn't find her to be an entirely unlikable character -- even if decency doesn't come easy. But she's also determined and I thought at the end of Blue Jasmine that she had sunk to rock bottom, partly through her own devices, but would find a way back. The ending was certainly sobering and tragic in a way, but rung very true and can be mused on further because she's such a complex, but well-written character who we're able to understand.

Re: last movie you watched

Sun Feb 02, 2014 6:00 pm

jak wrote:Made some time for this film I had never seen. Ang Lee has made some outstanding films and this one was very good. The cinematography was perfect. A very good looking film. Set in the 70's the film had great atmosphere. This movie wasn't a success when released and is somewhat forgotten about I think. Lee's other works have far out shadowed it. It's worth seeking out and deserves a watch though. As usual the Criterion release is outstanding.


I'm a big fan of Ang Lee and rate The Ice Storm very highly.

Re: last movie you watched

Sun Feb 02, 2014 10:17 pm

greystoke wrote:
rocknroller wrote:Went to see The Wolf of Wall Street at the cinema yeaterday,as a one off watch it was a good movie as far as the story goes well over the top.Leonardo DiCaprio was amazing as always.the downside (for me)i hated the main character Jordan Belfort now i don't mind people doing well for themselfs in life,but if everything this guy did thats in the movie is true then i just can not relate to the character,he stole from working class people and became rich and out of contol and the more i watched the more irritated i became.would i buy this movie to keep no,would i watch it again no,but as a one off movie worth watching for an eye opener to see how higher up people deal with our money or even run our country.


I think an inability to find a way to really empathise with Jordan Belfort, or at least get on his side, is one if the few drawbacks in The Wolf of Wall Street. I liked it very much, incidentally, but you're absolutely right, rocknroller. Di Caprio is sensational here, of course; it's one of his best performances, in my opinion. But we never see the other side of his actions -- the ramifications on those whom he scams, and whose voices we only occasionally hear. There isn't much in the way of remorse, either, which begs the question of whether this really is a cautionary tale, or a film that revels in the excess shown. There's also a slight air of misogyny, although I would like to think this isn't deliberate. Scorsese depicts a man's world, and other than Joanna Lumley, who was very good here, the female roles are both limited and dubious when, near the end, a co-worker who is said to have been very important for the company and having been there from the start, was totally new to my eyes within the narrative. Perhaps I missed her earlier in the film, but this was a token nod among hookers and strippers. I thought Margot Robbie, who played Belfort's second wife, was very good in her role, though. She's gorgeous and captivating on screen, but brings more than great looks; she plays smart and has tons of personality. I also thought she was good in About Time, Richard Curtis' most recent film.



Im glad its not just me then lol.i thought there was a large air of misogyny,not saying that some men would not act like this if they had the money but Belfort and his sidekicks were way over the top if this was working class guys even trying to do this they would be in jail.your right no ramifications only a short spell in jail and its all forgotten about.that said love the scene where di caprio is fighting with his second wife in the bedroom and she throw's water over him its so funny and your right Margot Robbie was great in her roll and stunning to look at also !!!

Re: last movie you watched

Mon Feb 03, 2014 2:17 pm

th.jpg
On friday we saw "I,Frankenstein"based on the graphic comic novel,a waste of a title and a character in a film that should have just been about the war with the gargoyles and the demons,instead of using the "Frankenstein "character to put butts on seats.
On Saturday we watched a film recommended a while ago by "Greystoke"called"The Selfish Giant"
A bleak depressing look at David Camerons Britain.Two young schoolboys find their close-knit friendship beginning to unravel as they fall under the spell of an unscrupulous scrap-dealer in this bleak drama based on the story by Oscar Wilde. Consummate outsiders both in school and in life, 13-year-old Arbor (Conner Chapman) and his best mate Swifty (Shaun Thomas) find their futures looking uncertain after being expelled from school. Despite their shared setback, both boys remain determined to provide for their families, even if it means performing shady jobs for local scrap-metal merchant Kitten (Sean Gilder).
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Re: last movie you watched

Mon Feb 03, 2014 3:28 pm

jak wrote:Just finished this film. I felt like a good sprawling Mandarin epic would get me in the mood for the Super Bowl. I can't get enough of these type of films. Chow Yun Fat is a favorite. For those who appreciate good audio,this film is reference quality.


There's some interesting themes in Ride With the Devil, although it's not one of my favourite Ang Lee films. Visually, it's very impressive and well acted, whilst Lee does offer a unique view of the American Civil War that's told with an eye on the small before the big. I haven't seen The Assassins yet, but I'm a big fan of Chow Yun Fat and have been since the heroic bloodshed era. He's a fine actor and exudes tremendous screen presence.

Re: last movie you watched

Mon Feb 03, 2014 3:32 pm

keninlincs wrote:
th.jpg
On friday we saw "I,Frankenstein"based on the graphic comic novel,a waste of a title and a character in a film that should have just been about the war with the gargoyles and the demons,instead of using the "Frankenstein "character to put butts on seats.
On Saturday we watched a film recommended a while ago by "Greystoke"called"The Selfish Giant"
A bleak depressing look at David Camerons Britain.Two young schoolboys find their close-knit friendship beginning to unravel as they fall under the spell of an unscrupulous scrap-dealer in this bleak drama based on the story by Oscar Wilde. Consummate outsiders both in school and in life, 13-year-old Arbor (Conner Chapman) and his best mate Swifty (Shaun Thomas) find their futures looking uncertain after being expelled from school. Despite their shared setback, both boys remain determined to provide for their families, even if it means performing shady jobs for local scrap-metal merchant Kitten (Sean Gilder).


I had my reservations about I, Frankenstein and can't say that I'm in a hurry to see it, Ken. It seems to have a slant on Underworld met with the Van Helsing film from a few years ago. Hope you liked The Selfish Giant, though; I thought it was superb and one of last year's best films.

Re: last movie you watched

Mon Feb 03, 2014 4:19 pm

Last film I watched (all the way through for the first time, incidentally, was "Jailhouse Rock". I'd forgotten how good Elvis was in the role of Vince Everett!

Re: last movie you watched

Mon Feb 03, 2014 5:04 pm

greystoke wrote:
keninlincs wrote:
th.jpg
On friday we saw "I,Frankenstein"based on the graphic comic novel,a waste of a title and a character in a film that should have just been about the war with the gargoyles and the demons,instead of using the "Frankenstein "character to put butts on seats.
On Saturday we watched a film recommended a while ago by "Greystoke"called"The Selfish Giant"
A bleak depressing look at David Camerons Britain.Two young schoolboys find their close-knit friendship beginning to unravel as they fall under the spell of an unscrupulous scrap-dealer in this bleak drama based on the story by Oscar Wilde. Consummate outsiders both in school and in life, 13-year-old Arbor (Conner Chapman) and his best mate Swifty (Shaun Thomas) find their futures looking uncertain after being expelled from school. Despite their shared setback, both boys remain determined to provide for their families, even if it means performing shady jobs for local scrap-metal merchant Kitten (Sean Gilder).


I had my reservations about I, Frankenstein and can't say that I'm in a hurry to see it, Ken. It seems to have a slant on Underworld met with the Van Helsing film from a few years ago. Hope you liked The Selfish Giant, though; I thought it was superb and one of last year's best films.
Yes I really liked "The Selfish Giant"british movie making at its finest,Conner Chapman was superb in his portrayal of the troubled Arbor, and Bradford never looked so cold

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Re: last movie you watched

Mon Feb 03, 2014 8:41 pm

jak wrote:I never heard of The Selfish Giant. I see it's available on Amazon UK and Ebay. I will add this film to my list of purchases in the next week or so.

Hi Jak,it is well worth picking up
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Re: last movie you watched

Tue Feb 04, 2014 6:49 am

keninlincs wrote: "The Selfish Giant"british movie making at its finest,Conner Chapman was superb in his portrayal of the troubled Arbor, and Bradford never looked so cold.

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Sounds like a movie I'll be picking up soon. Thanks Ken. :smt023

Re: last movie you watched

Fri Feb 07, 2014 5:12 pm

A perfect murder (1998) starring Michael Douglas, Gwyneth Paltrow, and Viggo Mortensen. A remake of the Alfred Hitchcock classic Dial M for Murder (1954).
This is a great film, the story is excellent and the performances are great too.

Re: last movie you watched

Fri Feb 07, 2014 5:30 pm

Last night we watched "Philomena"starring Judi Dench and Steve Coogan,Based on the book by Martin Sixsmith and with a screenplay by Steve Coogan.No spoilers here apart from its a mothers search for the son she had taken away from her by Nuns in the 1950s,another great film from the UK.surely Oscar material
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Re: last movie you watched

Fri Feb 07, 2014 5:41 pm

keninlincs wrote:Last night we watched "Philomena"starring Judi Dench and Steve Coogan,Based on the book by Martin Sixsmith and with a screenplay by Steve Coogan.No spoilers here apart from its a mothers search for the son she had taken away from her by Nuns in the 1950s,another great film from the UK.surely Oscar material


Where is "Philomena" from?

Re: last movie you watched

Fri Feb 07, 2014 9:59 pm

I also thought Philomena was very good, Ken. It’s a film that finds a near perfect balance between heart-warming and humorous, but never tries to undermine the fact that this is a sad and tragic story of a girl whose baby was taken from her through no fault of her own. Steve Coogan surprised me here, both with the quality of his screenplay and with a very layered, assertive and genuine performance. Judi Dench was perfectly cast as the titular Philomena, whilst a sure hand was present throughout with Stephen Frears in the director’s chair. A good companion piece to Philomena is Peter Mullan’s 2002 film, The Magdalene Sisters, which is harrowing, but is an excellent movie with a poignant and powerful story at its core. I don't think that Philomena will win any Oscars this year, although it's a worthy nominee in four categories and may well surprise in the Best Adapted Screenplay category -- although my tip is 12 Years a Slave.

Re: last movie you watched

Fri Feb 07, 2014 10:21 pm

Yeah 12 year slave for me too !!!

Re: last movie you watched

Fri Feb 07, 2014 10:56 pm

rocknroller wrote:Yeah 12 year slave for me too !!!


In every category that it's nominated?