Chat talk and light discussion

Re: last movie you watched

Mon Dec 02, 2013 6:32 pm

It's on national, but limited, release, Ken. So it may be playing near you.

Re: last movie you watched

Mon Dec 02, 2013 9:11 pm

Thanks H I will make a point of seeing it

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Re: last movie you watched

Tue Dec 03, 2013 11:54 pm

jak wrote:One film down,24 more to go in this amazing set. This is an amazing collection of films. The packaging is superb.


This looks like an awesome set. I'm looking forward to getting it, also.

Re: last movie you watched

Tue Dec 03, 2013 11:57 pm

I saw Saving Mr. Banks at the cinema today, a film based on the story of how Walt Disney bought the rights to make Mary Poppins. Starring Tom Hanks as Disney, Emma Thompson as P.L. Travers, the author of Mary Poppins, and Colin Farrell, as Travers' father -- as seen in flashback. The crux of the story centres around Travers' time spent at Disney studios, working with Disney, Don DaGradi and the brilliant Sherman brothers, as a screenplay is eeked out and some sort of agreement reached between the film-makers and the defensive Travers. Here, both Hanks and Thompson shine, playing opposite types butting heads over a common interest. Thompson is outstanding as Travers, walking a fine line between being risible and empathetic, as scathing barbs and a difficult temperament block the ebullient Walt at every turn. Hanks, equally good, is completely genial and very convincing in his role. We know and see Disney's motivations, become aware of a pointed drive to succeed and create a world in which he is master of his domain. But this is a likeable character, as is Travers, whose backstory is told in extensive flashbacks. Her childhood, in the Australian outback, especially her relationship with an alcoholic father, comes to define her life as she wrestles with memories of tragedy and the ideal. Thus, her determination not to allow her beloved creation to be tampered with by Disney. Her resolve loosens, of course. We all know the film was ultimately made and became a tremendous success. But this is the story (albeit a romanticised one) of how the film came to be. Films about the movie business are often favourites of mine, and this is no exception. Saving Mr. Banks is a really wonderful film. The story is well written and directed, but comes with an enormous cache for anyone fond of Mary Poppins. The flashbacks occasionally fracture the narrative and spell out Travers' arc a bit too freely, but ultimately, the back-story is vital to her catharsis. Especially when this aspect of the story is so well handled -- despite feeling a bit like a different film entirely. But this is a film that should find heaps of interest this award season. Emma Thompson is a hot contender for best actress and should give Cate Blanchett a run for her money, but this could be one of those rare occasions when an actor is nominated in two categories -- Tom Hanks for best supporting actor and best actor. For his wonderful performance in Saving Mr. Banks and his outstanding turn in Captain Philips.

Re: last movie you watched

Thu Dec 05, 2013 10:32 pm

I saw Carrie at the cinema today, Kimberly Pierce's version of the Stephen King novel, which was first brought to the big screen quite brilliantly by Brian De Palma, in 1976. Here, the talented Chloe Grace Moretz takes the lead role as Carrie White, with Julianne Moore in the role of her overbearing and religious obsessed mother. Story-wise, this version doesn't veer far from De Palma's film (or the novel), but it lacks the operatic oeuvre and strokes of creativity that marked the 1976 film. Instead, an uneven tone is struck from the offset, with Moretz able to convince as being naive, but not the social oddity or pitiful-looking figure personified by Sissy Spacek. Conversely, Moore is too full-on by half as the mother, yet never seems to have the upper hand on Carrie. Unlike her cruel and taunting classmates who think nothing of filming Carrie on their mobile phones when she has her first period in the gym showers. Scenes that Pierce handles well, as she does later in the film when Carrie is at the prom. There's a warmth here and an affection for the character, despite the inevitable. Although, most of the secondary characters are strictly one-dimensional, to such a degree that, the blistering finale doesn't strike with the same fire of Dr Palma's film. Here, Carrie's abilities are more akin to superpowers, whilst her Sadakoesque contortions serve to detract from her real inner turmoil. And with the absence of a great score, not to mention some creativity amiss as the film ends, Carrie ends up as a film that may appease those unaware of the original, but won't do much for more seasoned horror fans. Which is a pity, because I expected more of this film. And certainly hoped it would be better than your typical spate of remakes. And to some extent, it is. But that's more to the value of Chloe Moretz, who has huge potential and will absolutely go on to better things.

Re: last movie you watched

Fri Dec 06, 2013 11:13 am

Last night i saw "Angels Sing"starring Willie Nelson ,Kris Kristofferson,and Harry Connick Jr,a pleasant little Christmas movie made in Austin Texas based on the book by Turk Pipkin
Harry Connick, Jr. stars as Michael Walker, who, as a child, wished every day was Christmas. That is, until a tragic accident crushed his holiday spirit. Thirty years later, Michael still can't muster any joy for Christmas, despite encouragement from his playful wife (Connie Britton) and well intentioned parents (Kris Kristofferson and Fionnula Flanagan). But when his young son (Chandler Canterbury) faces a tragedy, Michael needs to make amends with his past. A mysterious man named Nick (Willie Nelson) gives Michael a gift that instills in him the courage to find the Christmas joy that he lost. (c) Official Site
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Re: last movie you watched

Fri Dec 06, 2013 11:46 am

Saw The Book Thief.

I had no idea that it was *not* a "Holocaust Film," but I'm glad it is exactly what it is. Many who have read the book say it leaves a lot out, but that's to be expected. I was very impressed.

Many of the critics didn't seem to "get" the actual point of the film. It is not a history lesson. Period. It's not even about "books" and the Nazis.

It's about life, which is why the first voice you hear is The Narrator: "Death."

The film makes a simple, profound point. "You are going to die." Those are the first words you hear.

You are; you might be 6 or 106, but you are going to die. You might live in 21st century Europe, or Nazi Germany, but you are going to die.

Which means this: how will you live?

Recommended.

rjm

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Re: last movie you watched

Tue Dec 10, 2013 10:55 pm

I saw Homefront at the cinema yesterday, the latest film to be written and produced by Sylvester Stallone, along with frequent collaborator, Avi Lerner. Stallone wrote Homefront as a vehicle for himself, but stood down to allow Jason Statham the leading role of a former DEA officer who is living in rural Louisiana with his young daughter. Directed by Gary Fleder, Statham is supported by a fine cast that includes Kate Bosworth, Winona Ryder and James Franco. The story takes hold when Statham's young daughter defends herself in the school playground against a bully. The bully's mother, played by Bosworth (who is good as a rake-thin junkie) wants retribution but finds her sleazy boyfriend to be no match for Statham. But when her brother, a local drug dealer, played by James Franco, gets involved, the stakes are raised until Statham's past comes back to haunt him. Basically, this is nuts and bolts stuff, buoyed by a strong cast and good performances, but the script offers nothing special, whilst the direction is just adequate. Although the colour palette seemed to change as much as Statham's wandering accent. It's not a bad film, nor is it unlikable, although Statham has done better and more interesting stuff recently, but this holds no surprises and does nothing unique.

Re: last movie you watched

Wed Dec 11, 2013 1:10 am

i saw 'home alone 1' and i wondered what is the name of the old movie broadcasted by "kevin" ? thanx in advance

Re: last movie you watched

Wed Dec 11, 2013 11:44 am

keninlincs wrote:Last night i saw "Angels Sing"starring Willie Nelson ,Kris Kristofferson,and Harry Connick Jr,a pleasant little Christmas movie made in Austin Texas based on the book by Turk Pipkin
Harry Connick, Jr. stars as Michael Walker, who, as a child, wished every day was Christmas. That is, until a tragic accident crushed his holiday spirit. Thirty years later, Michael still can't muster any joy for Christmas, despite encouragement from his playful wife (Connie Britton) and well intentioned parents (Kris Kristofferson and Fionnula Flanagan). But when his young son (Chandler Canterbury) faces a tragedy, Michael needs to make amends with his past. A mysterious man named Nick (Willie Nelson) gives Michael a gift that instills in him the courage to find the Christmas joy that he lost. (c) Official Site


Hi Ken,hope all is well with you.
....quick question,what role does Lyle Lovett play in the Movie?

Re: last movie you watched

Wed Dec 11, 2013 11:49 am

Elton wrote:
keninlincs wrote:Last night i saw "Angels Sing"starring Willie Nelson ,Kris Kristofferson,and Harry Connick Jr,a pleasant little Christmas movie made in Austin Texas based on the book by Turk Pipkin
Harry Connick, Jr. stars as Michael Walker, who, as a child, wished every day was Christmas. That is, until a tragic accident crushed his holiday spirit. Thirty years later, Michael still can't muster any joy for Christmas, despite encouragement from his playful wife (Connie Britton) and well intentioned parents (Kris Kristofferson and Fionnula Flanagan). But when his young son (Chandler Canterbury) faces a tragedy, Michael needs to make amends with his past. A mysterious man named Nick (Willie Nelson) gives Michael a gift that instills in him the courage to find the Christmas joy that he lost. (c) Official Site


Hi Ken,hope all is well with you.
....quick question,what role does Lyle Lovett play in the Movie?

He is one of the neighbors of Harry Connick

Re: last movie you watched

Thu Dec 12, 2013 3:33 pm

Just watched "Picnic At Hanging Rock" by Peter Weir(d) for the very first time. Strange movie, a little surreal and philosophical and it features (in my opinion) some homosexual innuendos. Nice to learn that Jackie Weaver used to be quite attractive when she was young. :wink: No need for me to watch it again.

Re: last movie you watched

Thu Dec 12, 2013 4:40 pm

I saw Nebraska and The Bishop's Wife at the cinema yesterday. Nebraska, the latest film from Alexander Payne, is the story of an elderly man's quest to collect a million dollar prize he's won in the post. Starring Bruce Dern, in a career-best performance, his character, Woody, is first seen trying to walk from Montana to Nebraska when he's stopped on the highway by a police officer. Woody isn't entirely clear of mind, whilst his sons are aloof and his wife, played brilliantly by June Squibb, constantly berates him. But Woody is determined to get his million dollars and endeavours to walk to Nebraska even when his son explains that it's only a mail scam that he's trying to collect. Undeterred, Woody is soon being driven to Nebraska by his son, where the narrative picks up on the conventions of a buddy/road movie, as they encounter numerous situations and characters along the way. In particular, Woody's devious old business partner, played superbly by Stacy Keach, and a leeching family who want their share of Woody's money. At times, Nebraska is reminiscent of Yashujiro Ozu's Tokyo Story, with the elderly characters being misunderstood and unappreciated by their children, until they learn of their lives, loves and a very full existence that came to shape who they are. This is brilliant story-telling and although I'm saying this often just now, Nebraska is one of the year's best films. And it's just great to see Bruce Dern give such a magnificent performance. I've been a fan of his for years, especially in westerns, where he always stood out as being a dangerous or unhinged character. But his performance in Nebraska is something new; that wicked smile replaced by sad eyes and gangly body that barely fits together properly. I would love to see him earn a second Oscar nomination for his performance here and can't recommend this film highly enough. June Squibb, who plays Woody's wife, is equally good and Stacy Keach impresses very, very much in a smaller role.

The Bishop's Wife is a film that seems to have gained a newly found affection over the past decade, or so. Perhaps spurred somewhat by the 1996 remake, The Preacher's Wife, which starred Denzel Washington and Whitney Houston. In the original, Cary Grant stars as Dudley, a tall, dark stranger who just happens to be an angel. Dudley visits a small town at Christmas time to help with the prayers of its resident bishop, played by David Niven, and his wife, played by Loretta Young. Niven's Bishop Henry Brougham is totally bowled over at Dudley's very existence, believing he is who he says he is, as Dudley appears and disappears, opens locked doors and charms everyone he encounters. But he can't quite reason with Dudely actually being in his life and begins to feel increasingly frustrated at Dudley for splendid time with his wife. Produced by Samuel Goldwyn and directed by Henry Koster, this charming film brings a genuine warmth and sincere religious overtones to a film that may have been overshadowed somewhat by It's a Wonderful Life. A couple of the kids from that film even appear here, whilst Mary Poppins is a film that plays out in a remarkably similar fashion to this. But it's a gem that's found its way onto Christmas TV schedules more and more in recent years, and is wonderful to see on the big screen.

Re: last movie you watched

Fri Dec 13, 2013 12:49 pm

keninlincs wrote:
Elton wrote:
keninlincs wrote:Last night i saw "Angels Sing"starring Willie Nelson ,Kris Kristofferson,and Harry Connick Jr,a pleasant little Christmas movie made in Austin Texas based on the book by Turk Pipkin
Harry Connick, Jr. stars as Michael Walker, who, as a child, wished every day was Christmas. That is, until a tragic accident crushed his holiday spirit. Thirty years later, Michael still can't muster any joy for Christmas, despite encouragement from his playful wife (Connie Britton) and well intentioned parents (Kris Kristofferson and Fionnula Flanagan). But when his young son (Chandler Canterbury) faces a tragedy, Michael needs to make amends with his past. A mysterious man named Nick (Willie Nelson) gives Michael a gift that instills in him the courage to find the Christmas joy that he lost. (c) Official Site


Hi Ken,hope all is well with you.
....quick question,what role does Lyle Lovett play in the Movie?

He is one of the neighbors of Harry Connick


A huge thanks Ken.. :smt006

Re: last movie you watched

Sun Dec 15, 2013 5:29 pm

I saw The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug at the cinema on Friday. This is the epic second instalment in Peter Jackson's Hobbit trilogy -- a trilogy that stretches, expands and adds to a rather small source novel. A novel that could have been adapted to fit a singular film, perhaps two, if adhering to the text. But Jackson has added new characters, situations and employed characters from the Lord of the Rings stories. And whilst the idea of splitting a story adapted from one book is more frequently being done these days, the question that has to be asked is whether doing so is more an artistic, or a financial decision, undertook at a studio's behest. This worked with Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, and I think it works with the Hobbit stories. In this instalment, there's less exposition than The Hobbit, and with established characters, the narrative starts at a rollicking pace and rarely lets up. Here, Bilbo has become a more assertive and confident character, playing a key role in many of the action set-pieces, whilst Thorin's noble intentions seem somewhat tarnished as his arc widens. Unfortunately, most of the other dwarves become supplementary to the narrative, but with the return of Legolas and the introduction of Evangeline Lilly's warrior elf, Tauriel, there's much action and a fledgling love triangle. What really stands out and impressed me, was some of the larger scale moments, such as the barrel escape and an encounter with giant spiders. There's also a touch of Hammer studios present in Laketown -- but the big payoff is Smaug, himself. Stunningly rendered, voiced magnificently by Benedict Cumberbatch, who brings an air of Shere Khan met with Kaa, the snake; and like much of the film, I found this part compelling. For some, another near-three hour epic may be too much, whilst purists may balk at new characters and a very fleshed-out story. But I loved it, and although I could say that several scenes could have been trimmed, and a few, perhaps, cut, I enjoyed being in this world and will certainly see this a second time over Christmas.

Re: last movie you watched

Sun Dec 15, 2013 7:18 pm

Yesterday, I watch here in Germany on BR the good Italo-Western Charro with Elvis Presley, Victor French and sexy Ina Balin. :smt007

Re: last movie you watched

Wed Dec 18, 2013 1:33 am

I saw The Innocents and - for the second time - Gravity at the cinema today. My thoughts and feelings on Gravity haven't changed since my first viewing. It's a truly magnificent film and an incredible piece of movie-making. The Innocents, Jack Clayton's classic chiller, is a film I've always liked and admired. Seeing it on the big screen, properly projected in Cinemascope, was a treat. This remains the touchstone for many horror films of this nature, but with a splendid screenplay, superb direction, Freddie Francis's terrific cinematography and a marvellous central performance by Deborah Kerr, this has rarely been bettered. The mood and atmosphere created retains a real sense of dread, without forcing its hand or succumbing to convention -- something the likes of James Wan could learn from. The film's rich subtext makes it a movie worth seeing repeatedly, and for me, its power remains undiminished. This is great cinema.

Re: last movie you watched

Thu Dec 19, 2013 4:37 pm

I had the opportunity to watch the second Hobbit last saturday but didn't go. I saw "This Is The End" and thought it was hilarious, although I think it's a typical film for boys and one can argue about the ending. Then I watched "Trance" and was disappointed, although I like most of Danny Boyle's movies. Some scenes were not too shabby though... :wink:

Gosh, I've never seen "The Innocents" but I guess this is a must see for me! Thank you so much for your review, greystoke!

Winston wrote:Yesterday, I watch here in Germany on BR the good Italo-Western Charro with Elvis Presley, Victor French and sexy Ina Balin.

You have "Charro!" on Blu-ray??? Wow, Ina Balin's arse in Hi-Def! :lol: (BTW, did you ever see that deleted scene?)

Re: last movie you watched

Thu Dec 19, 2013 6:22 pm

James Mason and Robert Preston chew up the scenary in "Child's Play" (no, not that one!), a bizarre, forgotten thriller from 1972, directed by Sidney Lumet, that Netflix happened to recommend to me this evening. It tells the story of two warring teachers at a Catholic all-boys school, with one (Mason) accusing the other (Preston) of trying to drive him out by tormenting his ill mother with sick phone calls, sending him pornography, and turning the boys and the other teachers against him. Into this mayhem comes Beau Bridges, playing one of Preston’s former students, who returns to the school as a teacher and slowly but surely tries to decipher the truth from the lies. Meanwhile, the audience is left wondering quite what this has to do with the pupils of the school turning against each other in ever more serious incidents of physical violence.

Historically, it fits within a decade-long cycle of films with similar themes such as If; Unman, Wittering and Zigo; The Devil’s Playground; and Absolution. Absolution is the worst of that bunch (although worth seeing for having Richard Burton starring alongside Billy Connolly!), but it at least remains a diverting and entertaining thriller. The same can’t be said for Child’s Play. For all Lumet’s credentials, and the starry cast, this is a leaden mess of a film which, while intriguing, is also ridiculously dull for long stretches. It’s simply not as shocking, mysterious, thrilling or chilling as it could and should be – and ends up as a cross between Village of the Damned and a poison pen mystery with Miss Marple.

Much of the problem here seems to lie in the film’s stage origins. I happen to know the play quite well, having thought about mounting an amateur production of it at one point, and it has to be said that it works much better as a stage play. Lumet simply fails to pull apart the long sequences with one setting to make it more filmic, and the violence that might be shocking on stage simply isn’t when translated to film. The violent set-pieces amongst the pupils could have been unnerving, perverse, hallucinatory experiences, but they simply aren’t. Ultimately, the film fails most in its conclusion – unanswered questions seem more fitting for a stage play, but here there are just too many loose ends that don’t add up.

Robert Preston overacts like hell from start to finish, although Mason does his best with the material and the direction he has(n’t) been given. In the end, it’s an interesting failure, that it’s nice to see being made available again – but it also makes one yearn for a DVD of the superb Unman, Wittering and Zigo to show just how good this kind of narrative can actually be.

(U,W & Z is kicking around on youtube in so-so quality, but well worth a watch).

Re: last movie you watched

Thu Dec 19, 2013 9:27 pm

luckyjackson1 wrote:I had the opportunity to watch the second Hobbit last saturday but didn't go. I saw "This Is The End" and thought it was hilarious, although I think it's a typical film for boys and one can argue about the ending. Then I watched "Trance" and was disappointed, although I like most of Danny Boyle's movies. Some scenes were not too shabby though... :wink:

Gosh, I've never seen "The Innocents" but I guess this is a must see for me! Thank you so much for your review, greystoke!

Winston wrote:Yesterday, I watch here in Germany on BR the good Italo-Western Charro with Elvis Presley, Victor French and sexy Ina Balin.

You have "Charro!" on Blu-ray??? Wow, Ina Balin's arse in Hi-Def! :lol: (BTW, did you ever see that deleted scene?)


I haven't seen This is the End, yet. But I'll probably see The Hobbit again between Christmas and New Year. Trance had its moments, but it's a bit convoluted and I don't think James MacAvoy is entirely convincing here. He was better in Filth, but I don't think that was a great film, either. But Trance had much in its favour, and works in most areas if you're willing to invest in the characters and enjoy a decent heist film with a great snatch at the end. :wink:

Re: last movie you watched

Thu Dec 19, 2013 10:32 pm

luckyjackson1 wrote:I had the opportunity to watch the second Hobbit last saturday but didn't go. I saw "This Is The End" and thought it was hilarious, although I think it's a typical film for boys and one can argue about the ending. Then I watched "Trance" and was disappointed, although I like most of Danny Boyle's movies. Some scenes were not too shabby though... :wink:

Gosh, I've never seen "The Innocents" but I guess this is a must see for me! Thank you so much for your review, greystoke!

Winston wrote:Yesterday, I watch here in Germany on BR the good Italo-Western Charro with Elvis Presley, Victor French and sexy Ina Balin.

You have "Charro!" on Blu-ray??? Wow, Ina Balin's arse in Hi-Def! :lol: (BTW, did you ever see that deleted scene?)


The Innocents really is a must!

Re: last movie you watched

Fri Dec 20, 2013 6:27 pm

greystoke wrote:
luckyjackson1 wrote:I had the opportunity to watch the second Hobbit last saturday but didn't go. I saw "This Is The End" and thought it was hilarious, although I think it's a typical film for boys and one can argue about the ending. Then I watched "Trance" and was disappointed, although I like most of Danny Boyle's movies. Some scenes were not too shabby though... :wink:

Gosh, I've never seen "The Innocents" but I guess this is a must see for me! Thank you so much for your review, greystoke!

Winston wrote:Yesterday, I watch here in Germany on BR the good Italo-Western Charro with Elvis Presley, Victor French and sexy Ina Balin.

You have "Charro!" on Blu-ray??? Wow, Ina Balin's arse in Hi-Def! :lol: (BTW, did you ever see that deleted scene?)


I haven't seen This is the End, yet. But I'll probably see The Hobbit again between Christmas and New Year. Trance had its moments, but it's a bit convoluted and I don't think James MacAvoy is entirely convincing here. He was better in Filth, but I don't think that was a great film, either. But Trance had much in its favour, and works in most areas if you're willing to invest in the characters and enjoy a decent heist film with a great snatch at the end. :wink:

Are you talking about Rosario Dawson? :P

I didn't like the plot twist at the end, wasn't that convincing to me.

poormadpeter wrote:The Innocents really is a must!

A friend of mine owns the blu-ray, I might borrow it in time.

Re: last movie you watched

Sat Dec 21, 2013 1:00 pm

Last night I finally watched "The Innocents". It certainly IS a pioneer of "ghost movies", isn't it?
But I don't think it could live up with today's viewing standards anymore, a lot of (especially young) people would probably call it a bore.
I tried to watch it with "60's eyes" and yes, it was quite something. But I was never really terrified or scared.
One annoying aspect was that I watched the movie in english with german subtitles. It seemed that they unfortunately used the original german dialogues for the translation, and it seemed to me that they were most of the time totally out of context!
Alone the german title of the movie, "Schloss des Schreckens" (Castle Of Terror) is plainly awful and a completely wrong choice.
Great atmosphere, well crafted and acted. But I don't think I'll ever watch this again. And I'm glad I didn't buy it in the first place (already ordered but cancelled it after a friend of mine told me he owns the blu-ray).
But I'm glad I closed this gap in education. :wink:
I wonder if Elvis ever watched that movie?

Re: last movie you watched

Sat Dec 21, 2013 4:10 pm

You're actually very right, because when I saw The Innocents at the cinema last week, there were two school classes at the screening. All teenagers, around fifteen or sixteen. When the film ended, many spoke up asking "is that it!?" or expressed how pointless it was. There was plenty of discussion in the foyer afterwards, but I think this missed the mark for them. It's a film of great subtext and is richly rewarding in successive viewings, but for kids wanting a thrill from a horror film, this may be best discovered away from the expectations of classmates. On the other hand, It's a Wonderful Life, which I saw on Thursday at the cinema, had almost 100 school children in attendance. They laughed in all the right places, cried and gave a roaring applause at the end. It's a Wonderful Life is a great film, but may be a better audience film for kids who would, perhaps, look elsewhere on television.

Re: last movie you watched

Sat Dec 21, 2013 5:26 pm

greystoke wrote:You're actually very right, because when I saw The Innocents at the cinema last week, there were two school classes at the screening. All teenagers, around fifteen or sixteen. When the film ended, many spoke up asking "is that it!?" or expressed how pointless it was. There was plenty of discussion in the foyer afterwards, but I think this missed the mark for them. It's a film of great subtext and is richly rewarding in successive viewings, but for kids wanting a thrill from a horror film, this may be best discovered away from the expectations of classmates. On the other hand, It's a Wonderful Life, which I saw on Thursday at the cinema, had almost 100 school children in attendance. They laughed in all the right places, cried and gave a roaring applause at the end. It's a Wonderful Life is a great film, but may be a better audience film for kids who would, perhaps, look elsewhere on television.


I think the problem is that today's generation are used to an Innocents-like first half in a horror film, only for the second half to be a special effects extravaganza where any sense of believability is pushed to one side in an exchange for visual excitement.