Chat talk and light discussion

Re: last movie you watched

Wed Oct 30, 2013 9:16 pm

I can't say that I was particularly fond of Gangster Squad, either. It was all bluster without much content, and despite an awful lot of time and money going into the film's production and design, it seemed inauthentic and too eager for explosions and exposition over story-telling and worthwhile action. Ryan Gosling was the main draw here, given his track-record of late, but his performance was flat and his character uninteresting, although, I'm sure Sean Penn had a blast going all Tony Montana for little more reason than he was able to.

I didn't care for The Conjuring, either. A horror film that epitomises what's wrong with commercial horror cinema today. This said, it was directed by the foremost progenitor of this kind of film, James Wan. So, expecting anything other than a disregarded for creating a real sense of dread, and spoiling any semblance of narrative tension with an onslaught of loud noises and forced reactions, was to be expected. Although, I did find the first half of the film moving at a pace unbecoming of Wan's typical narrative thrust, only for his more shop-worn tendencies to materialise as the nonsensical took hold and bludgeoned the senses of anyone seeking something that bit more substantial. But, again, this is the cinema of James Wan. The horror genre's equivalent of Michael Bay! I can, at least, be thankful that I was part of a well behaved audience when I saw The Conjuring, given that horror films of this nature are growing increasingly renowned for attracting a demographic whose disregard for time and place has forced refunds and even managerial involvement during one particular screening. Basically, they're an easy ticket for for a cheap thrill.

Re: last movie you watched

Wed Oct 30, 2013 9:30 pm

greystoke wrote:I can't say that I was particularly fond of Gangster Squad, either. It was all bluster without much content, and despite an awful lot of time and money going into the film's production and design, it seemed inauthentic and too eager for explosions and exposition over story-telling and worthwhile action. Ryan Gosling was the main draw here, given his track-record of late, but his performance was flat and his character uninteresting, although, I'm sure Sean Penn had a blast going all Tony Montana for little more reason than he was able to.

I didn't care for The Conjuring, either. A horror film that epitomises what's wrong with commercial horror cinema today. This said, it was directed by the foremost progenitor of this kind of film, James Wan. So, expecting anything other than a disregarded for creating a real sense of dread, and spoiling any semblance of narrative tension with an onslaught of loud noises and forced reactions, was to be expected. Although, I did find the first half of the film moving at a pace unbecoming of Wan's typical narrative thrust, only for his more shop-worn tendencies to materialise as the nonsensical took hold and bludgeoned the senses of anyone seeking something that bit more substantial. But, again, this is the cinema of James Wan. The horror genre's equivalent of Michael Bay! I can, at least, be thankful that I was part of a well behaved audience when I saw The Conjuring, given that horror films of this nature are growing increasingly renowned for attracting a demographic whose disregard for time and place has forced refunds and even managerial involvement during one particular screening. Basically, they're an easy ticket for for a cheap thrill.


The only film of his that I really liked was the one that nobody else liked: Dead Silence.

Re: last movie you watched

Wed Oct 30, 2013 10:34 pm

greystoke wrote:
rocknroller wrote:
greystoke wrote:
rocknroller wrote:Went to see Sunshine on Leith today what a fantastic movie.hope this is a start of more scottish films showing the real scotland ! not about drugs and Violence.but about our humor,our culture,our wonderful city's(in this case edinburgh)hope this is a template of scottish movies of the future ! a must see !!!



phpBB [video]




And a little bit of scotland !!!

phpBB [video]



I'll also give a thumbs up to Sunshine on Leith, rocknroller. It wasn't perfect, and presented a romanticised Edinburgh that's sure to do wonders for the tourist trade, but it's immediately enjoyable, highly infectious and very endearing. Yes, it's predictable, given the songs and where they're bound to fit, or how they would be used, but the Proclaimers' catalogue is more than suitable for this kind of treatment. Equal to that of ABBA's, given comparisons to Mamma Mia. And kudos to Dexter Fletcher's direction and managing to keep such a busy and lively film together. Great performances, too. Including Peter Mullan, who may have been more at home in Filth, but showed how comfortable and diverse this superb actor is.


Its not perfect your right but the feel good factor and the great peter mullan and dexter Fletcher's direction make it a scottish movie to be proud of.for me the songs are much better sung than the songs on mama mia ! what did you think of filth ?


I thought there was much to admire in Filth, but not a lot to actually like. James McAvoy is excellent in the lead and I found him more convincing here than in Trance or Welcome to the Punch. Eddie Marsden was also very good, as was Jim Broadbent in a tricky role to pull off, but he's very memorable. And given how challenging the materials is, Jon Baird done a fine job in directing the film, considering that he's relatively inexperienced. But the narrative didn't work for me, because it failed to transcend who, and what, McAvoy's character was. It missed that moment of realisation which was needed to make him more than a corrupt, junkie cop with emotional issues. This was touched on, with his back story revealed and moments where a semblance of humanity was shown, but the final act should have been able to give this character some degree of empathy and affection, but only offers a narrative twist that doesn't convince. For some, I guess the relentless nature of the film will work, but I wanted something more. Something that made it worthwhile investing in this character, and doing so because there's an element of fascination in watching him stoop so low, but with a wink to the audience. But that's not enough to encourage genuine goodwill for a character who doesn't actually deserve any, and that's where Filth stumbles, in my opinion.



I agree i so wanted to like filth but i really struggled with it.i thought it was too over the top to be believed and i had no empathy or affection for the main character !!!

Re: last movie you watched

Fri Nov 01, 2013 10:42 am

Last night, i watched Jerry Maguire movie - Tome Cruise ,Renée Zellweger..

Re: last movie you watched

Fri Nov 01, 2013 4:35 pm

poormadpeter wrote:
greystoke wrote:I can't say that I was particularly fond of Gangster Squad, either. It was all bluster without much content, and despite an awful lot of time and money going into the film's production and design, it seemed inauthentic and too eager for explosions and exposition over story-telling and worthwhile action. Ryan Gosling was the main draw here, given his track-record of late, but his performance was flat and his character uninteresting, although, I'm sure Sean Penn had a blast going all Tony Montana for little more reason than he was able to.

I didn't care for The Conjuring, either. A horror film that epitomises what's wrong with commercial horror cinema today. This said, it was directed by the foremost progenitor of this kind of film, James Wan. So, expecting anything other than a disregarded for creating a real sense of dread, and spoiling any semblance of narrative tension with an onslaught of loud noises and forced reactions, was to be expected. Although, I did find the first half of the film moving at a pace unbecoming of Wan's typical narrative thrust, only for his more shop-worn tendencies to materialise as the nonsensical took hold and bludgeoned the senses of anyone seeking something that bit more substantial. But, again, this is the cinema of James Wan. The horror genre's equivalent of Michael Bay! I can, at least, be thankful that I was part of a well behaved audience when I saw The Conjuring, given that horror films of this nature are growing increasingly renowned for attracting a demographic whose disregard for time and place has forced refunds and even managerial involvement during one particular screening. Basically, they're an easy ticket for for a cheap thrill.


The only film of his that I really liked was the one that nobody else liked: Dead Silence.

To me "Dead Silence" was okay, but forgettable.

"The Conjuring" was a rather let-down for me too, as it started off pretty well and got pretty uninteresting towards the end. I also didn't like "Sinister".

I'd rather watch the "Evil Dead" remake for the fourth time. :P

A couple of weeks ago I returned to "Evil Dead II - Dead By Dawn" and was still fascinated by the camera work during this film. But I never thought of it as a "comedy" or a funny movie. Still love it, though.

Re: last movie you watched

Fri Nov 01, 2013 8:42 pm

poormadpeter wrote:
greystoke wrote:I can't say that I was particularly fond of Gangster Squad, either. It was all bluster without much content, and despite an awful lot of time and money going into the film's production and design, it seemed inauthentic and too eager for explosions and exposition over story-telling and worthwhile action. Ryan Gosling was the main draw here, given his track-record of late, but his performance was flat and his character uninteresting, although, I'm sure Sean Penn had a blast going all Tony Montana for little more reason than he was able to.

I didn't care for The Conjuring, either. A horror film that epitomises what's wrong with commercial horror cinema today. This said, it was directed by the foremost progenitor of this kind of film, James Wan. So, expecting anything other than a disregarded for creating a real sense of dread, and spoiling any semblance of narrative tension with an onslaught of loud noises and forced reactions, was to be expected. Although, I did find the first half of the film moving at a pace unbecoming of Wan's typical narrative thrust, only for his more shop-worn tendencies to materialise as the nonsensical took hold and bludgeoned the senses of anyone seeking something that bit more substantial. But, again, this is the cinema of James Wan. The horror genre's equivalent of Michael Bay! I can, at least, be thankful that I was part of a well behaved audience when I saw The Conjuring, given that horror films of this nature are growing increasingly renowned for attracting a demographic whose disregard for time and place has forced refunds and even managerial involvement during one particular screening. Basically, they're an easy ticket for for a cheap thrill.


The only film of his that I really liked was the one that nobody else liked: Dead Silence.


Dead Silence is one of favorite movies..

Re: last movie you watched

Fri Nov 01, 2013 9:00 pm

Between yesterday and today, I've seen Ender's Game, The Selfish Giant and Philomena at the cinema. Adapted for the screen and directed by Gavin Hood, Ender's Game stems from a controversial novel by Orson Scott Card, although, without the homophobic overtones that are said to be present on paper. I haven't read the book, so can't comment further on the source material, but as a sci-fi action film that will have strong appeal for a younger audience, Ender's Game offers a narrative thick with questions on purpose, destiny and right and wrong, played out in the midst of a minor space opera. In this world, Earth's last line of defence against an impending alien invasion, is talented and able children who can think and act in ways adults are unable to. The Ender of the film's title being Ender Wiggin, a third generation military cadet played by the talented Asa Butterfield. Wiggin, like Luke Skywalker, is the "chosen one," having the correct emotional blend and physical abilities to lead an army to victory. Ender is taken under the wing of Harrison Ford's Col. Graff as the story leans on a more PG version of Starship Troopers met with Full Metal Jacket. Not without its flaws, Ender's Game isn't hugely impressive, but is likeable, despite a singular narrative and the occassional plotting issue. Ford's presence certainly helps, bringing an air of authority and notes of credibility to a story that is populated almost entirely by children. Whilst, Ben Kingsley's role is an unusual one from a narrative standpoint, especially as the film leads towards a climax that offers more questions than answers. But I suspect a sequel may be on the cards.

The Selfish Giant takes its name from the Oscar Wilde story, although it bears no relation, being an original story from director Cleo Barnard. Here, centering around the lives of two young Yorkshire boys who are without aspiration, education or a sound family unit. The two young stars of the film, Connor Chapman and Shaun Thomas, play Arbor and Swifty, best friends who spend their days skipping school and getting into further mischief in the streets and fields surrounding the run-down estate in which they live. Arbor, with his drug-addict brother and a mother who can't control them, and Swifty, with his numerous siblings and volatile parents who are so destitute they can't afford electricity to their house or a meal greater than beans and dry bread. By chance, the boys encounter two men stealing copper cable from the railway and, as the men hide from track engineers, the boys take the chance to steal the stolen cable and sell it to local scrap dealer, Kitten, played by Sean Gilder. The boys aspirations to earn some money has them working for Kitten, who abuses their naivety and trust as he pushes them into hard labour with little reward. Especially when Kitten sees Swifty's affinity with horses and an opportunity to win money trap racing on the motorway nearby. Not too far removed from Ken Loach's seminal Kes, The Selfish Giant is kitchen sink cinema with the added realism of people and place, Chapman and Thomas being non-professionals who reside in the area where the film is set, whilst the script and direction are uniformly excellent in a film that is devastingly powerful and intesely moving. Absolutely one of the year's best films.

Philomena is the story of a woman whose child was taken from her and given up for adoption in 1950s Ireland. Fifty years later, on the birthday of a son she didn't plan to have, but didn't want to lose, her grief and upset leads to a series of events in which an unknowing daughter's chance meeting with journalist, Martin Sixsmith, leads to a potential story and an unlikely friendship in a quest to find the woman's long-lost son. The Philomena of the film's title is played by superbly Judi Dench, who brings not only a quiet charm, but genuine humour, compassion and understanding to a wholly realised character. More cynical, and embittered, is the journalist, played by Steve Coogan, who produced the film and wrote its first-class screenplay. At first, their relationship is built entirely on necessity and a mutual understanding, but with this comes trust and empathy as they undertake a more subtle equivalent of a road movie, as Philomena and Sixsmith put together the pieces of a puzzle they hope will lead to her son. With a narrative that never faulters, and truly excellent performances, Philomena doesn't offer easy answers or pat resolutions, whilst the central characters are both intelligent and hugely endearing. Their exchanges proving enlightening, very compelling and often funny, despite the serious nature of the narrative and genuine issues being discussed. Especially those pertaining to the culture of slave labour, abuse and adoption at the hands of the Catholic nuns during the 1950s. This is dealt with without cliche or creating caricature, simply telling a fascinating story well, and doing so in such a fashion that Philomena becomes another one of this year's very best films. And, despite not being a fan of Steve Coogan or his brand of comedy, playing it straight here and having produced and written this film, Coogan deserves a lot of attention from BAFTA and the Oscars this forthcoming awards season, as does Judi Dench. Who, despite her acting credentials and impressive track-record, builds an unforgettable new character in one of her very best performances to date.

Re: last movie you watched

Sat Nov 02, 2013 2:29 am

luckyjackson1 wrote:
poormadpeter wrote:
greystoke wrote:I can't say that I was particularly fond of Gangster Squad, either. It was all bluster without much content, and despite an awful lot of time and money going into the film's production and design, it seemed inauthentic and too eager for explosions and exposition over story-telling and worthwhile action. Ryan Gosling was the main draw here, given his track-record of late, but his performance was flat and his character uninteresting, although, I'm sure Sean Penn had a blast going all Tony Montana for little more reason than he was able to.

I didn't care for The Conjuring, either. A horror film that epitomises what's wrong with commercial horror cinema today. This said, it was directed by the foremost progenitor of this kind of film, James Wan. So, expecting anything other than a disregarded for creating a real sense of dread, and spoiling any semblance of narrative tension with an onslaught of loud noises and forced reactions, was to be expected. Although, I did find the first half of the film moving at a pace unbecoming of Wan's typical narrative thrust, only for his more shop-worn tendencies to materialise as the nonsensical took hold and bludgeoned the senses of anyone seeking something that bit more substantial. But, again, this is the cinema of James Wan. The horror genre's equivalent of Michael Bay! I can, at least, be thankful that I was part of a well behaved audience when I saw The Conjuring, given that horror films of this nature are growing increasingly renowned for attracting a demographic whose disregard for time and place has forced refunds and even managerial involvement during one particular screening. Basically, they're an easy ticket for for a cheap thrill.


The only film of his that I really liked was the one that nobody else liked: Dead Silence.

To me "Dead Silence" was okay, but forgettable.

"The Conjuring" was a rather let-down for me too, as it started off pretty well and got pretty uninteresting towards the end. I also didn't like "Sinister".

I'd rather watch the "Evil Dead" remake for the fourth time. :P

A couple of weeks ago I returned to "Evil Dead II - Dead By Dawn" and was still fascinated by the camera work during this film. But I never thought of it as a "comedy" or a funny movie. Still love it, though.


I'm not saying Dead Silence is a great horror film, because it isn't. But it does do what it says on the tin, and manages to avoid that awful pitfall of becoming so ludicrous in the second half that it breaks the atmosphere created in the first half.

Re: last movie you watched

Sat Nov 02, 2013 2:46 am

Next movie I will see is in a couple hours. 12 Years A Slave. Will see if it's as good as everyone says. Lotta hype. Will report here..
.

_________

Here you go, in an Evernote link: http://www.evernote.com/shard/s305/sh/01c42fa0-ec24-4ce4-b2bb-7246404ad018/d7a31e8e40d05154b716c9b1532e9cc3

And if you feel strange about clicking an Evernote link (which is really very, uh, "spiffy" as they say in a certain film), I'll copy it over here:

Unusual experience at the theater tonight. The film defies genre; it cannot qualify as suspense, certainly. For one thing, the title tells us the denouement, and secondly, it is repetitive yet never dull. While an historical film, it calls for no social action, except perhaps to remember. It does not ask anyone to seek justice or some sort of redemption.

Justice can never be done in this case, or in any of the many other kidnapping cases during slavery. It's hard to be angry at this lack of justice in the face of far more recent injustices. That, I suppose, is what brings the film to our world: it never stops. There is no happy ending. And you feel so often as though any actions may be in vain. The actions of a character played by a famous actor do not result in "justice," but are what he claims: "duty." There is a difference.

Eventually, some may fault the film for its repetitive nature, but that would be terribly wrong. This film, unlike the old miniseries Roots, does not rise and fall with great drama. And you do not get know many of the characters well. Everyone seems to keep a certain distance from everyone else. There are no "lovable" characters who will be remembered in film history. No "Chicken George" or "Kunta Kinte." They are just not there; in fact, it is the very stripping of the lead character's very name that marks the general feel of the film. If anything, the beauty of the southern landscape has more of an identity here than the people in it.

There is no one to trust. Ever. There are no "good guys," either. Some do a certain moral "duty," but beyond that, there is a blanching of emotion, which is undoubtedly more characteristic of slavery than in any earlier depictions. When families are torn apart without a thought of what is called "sentiment," it doesn't pay to get close, and director Steve McQueen does not let us get close to the people in the film. His intention is to expose us to horrors and atrocities so regularly that we become used to them. That was slavery. That is what it was like. In the beginning of the film, a woman is told she would soon forget her children. And that is what we are asked to do here: keep our distance, lest we hurt. So, McQueen won't let us get close. And avoiding hurt and maintaining survival becomes the only goal, and the best for which one can hope.

So, don't expect to either love or hate the characters in this film; you won't. It is as unsentimental a film as I have seen. As the song says, "when you ain't got nothin,' you got nothin' to lose. You're invisible; you got no secrets to conceal." And that's about the size of it. America's history has made us invisible to each other.

Slavery stripped people of clothing, names, and eventually all sense of identity. The white slaveholders created a very real fantasy life for themselves, filled with luxury, and devoid of real feeling. A scene at a costume party best demonstrates the inner life, such as it was, of the plantation class. They were always in costume. (As were others, earlier in the film. No spoilers.) No one here has an identity, or if they did, they lost it long ago. And there is no retrieving it. I believe that is what McQueen wants you to take from the film: that you must not rejoice at any given point regarding the ongoing racial history of the United States of America. Just when you think it's time to cry happy tears, to rejoice, everything takes another turn for the worse. And so this history just keeps repeating, until we are so used to it that we have trained ourselves not to feel it. Until it feels almost "normal" not to feel much of anything at all. Because you'll pay if you feel, so you don't. You survive it, somehow. But live? The message that one ought to "live" and not merely survive is given the lie throughout the body of the film; it is not an "uplifting" or "inspirational" story. The truth is that the nation survives its own history, but perhaps has yet to live fully and completely, rejoicing in its own identity.

The film will leave you feeling a bit hollowed out, depleted of a sense of connection to your heritage as an American (if, indeed, you are one), whomever you are, be you white, black, or something else.


©Yours Truly.

rjm
Last edited by rjm on Sat Nov 02, 2013 10:07 am, edited 3 times in total.

Re: last movie you watched

Sat Nov 02, 2013 9:15 am

greystoke wrote:Between yesterday and today, I've seen Ender's Game, The Selfish Giant and Philomena at the cinema. Adapted for the screen and directed by Gavin Hood, Ender's Game stems from a controversial novel by Orson Scott Card, although, without the homophobic overtones that are said to be present on paper. I haven't read the book, so can't comment further on the source material, but as a sci-fi action film that will have strong appeal for a younger audience, Ender's Game offers a narrative thick with questions on purpose, destiny and right and wrong, played out in the midst of a minor space opera. In this world, Earth's last line of defence against an impending alien invasion, is talented and able children who can think and act in ways adults are unable to. The Ender of the film's title being Ender Wiggin, a third generation military cadet played by the talented Asa Butterfield. Wiggin, like Luke Skywalker, is the "chosen one," having the correct emotional blend and physical abilities to lead an army to victory. Ender is taken under the wing of Harrison Ford's Col. Graff as the story leans on a more PG version of Starship Troopers met with Full Metal Jacket. Not without its flaws, Ender's Game isn't hugely impressive, but is likeable, despite a singular narrative and the occassional plotting issue. Ford's presence certainly helps, bringing an air of authority and notes of credibility to a story that is populated almost entirely by children. Whilst, Ben Kingsley's role is an unusual one from a narrative standpoint, especially as the film leads towards a climax that offers more questions than answers. But I suspect a sequel may be on the cards.

The Selfish Giant takes its name from the Oscar Wilde story, although it bears no relation, being an original story from director Cleo Barnard. Here, centering around the lives of two young Yorkshire boys who are without aspiration, education or a sound family unit. The two young stars of the film, Connor Chapman and Shaun Thomas, play Arbor and Swifty, best friends who spend their days skipping school and getting into further mischief in the streets and fields surrounding the run-down estate in which they live. Arbor, with his drug-addict brother and a mother who can't control them, and Swifty, with his numerous siblings and volatile parents who are so destitute they can't afford electricity to their house or a meal greater than beans and dry bread. By chance, the boys encounter two men stealing copper cable from the railway and, as the men hide from track engineers, the boys take the chance to steal the stolen cable and sell it to local scrap dealer, Kitten, played by Sean Gilder. The boys aspirations to earn some money has them working for Kitten, who abuses their naivety and trust as he pushes them into hard labour with little reward. Especially when Kitten sees Swifty's affinity with horses and an opportunity to win money trap racing on the motorway nearby. Not too far removed from Ken Loach's seminal Kes, The Selfish Giant is kitchen sink cinema with the added realism of people and place, Chapman and Thomas being non-professionals who reside in the area where the film is set, whilst the script and direction are uniformly excellent in a film that is devastingly powerful and intesely moving. Absolutely one of the year's best films.

Philomena is the story of a woman whose child was taken from her and given up for adoption in 1950s Ireland. Fifty years later, on the birthday of a son she didn't plan to have, but didn't want to lose, her grief and upset leads to a series of events in which an unknowing daughter's chance meeting with journalist, Martin Sixsmith, leads to a potential story and an unlikely friendship in a quest to find the woman's long-lost son. The Philomena of the film's title is played by superbly Judi Dench, who brings not only a quiet charm, but genuine humour, compassion and understanding to a wholly realised character. More cynical, and embittered, is the journalist, played by Steve Coogan, who produced the film and wrote its first-class screenplay. At first, their relationship is built entirely on necessity and a mutual understanding, but with this comes trust and empathy as they undertake a more subtle equivalent of a road movie, as Philomena and Sixsmith put together the pieces of a puzzle they hope will lead to her son. With a narrative that never faulters, and truly excellent performances, Philomena doesn't offer easy answers or pat resolutions, whilst the central characters are both intelligent and hugely endearing. Their exchanges proving enlightening, very compelling and often funny, despite the serious nature of the narrative and genuine issues being discussed. Especially those pertaining to the culture of slave labour, abuse and adoption at the hands of the Catholic nuns during the 1950s. This is dealt with without cliche or creating caricature, simply telling a fascinating story well, and doing so in such a fashion that Philomena becomes another one of this year's very best films. And, despite not being a fan of Steve Coogan or his brand of comedy, playing it straight here and having produced and written this film, Coogan deserves a lot of attention from BAFTA and the Oscars this forthcoming awards season, as does Judi Dench. Who, despite her acting credentials and impressive track-record, builds an unforgettable new character in one of her very best performances to date.



Great reviews ! i will go and see ender's game and The Selfish Giant,not sure about Philomena does not look like my kind of movie.

Re: last movie you watched

Sat Nov 02, 2013 5:04 pm

I'm also looking forward to 12 Years a Slave, and Gravity, rjm. I'm avoiding your thread on the latter, incase of any spoilers. But I recommend Philomena very highly, rocknroller. I don't think you'll be disappointed.

Re: last movie you watched

Sat Nov 02, 2013 5:09 pm

Also, rocknroller, keep an eye out for some great films at the GFT this month and next -- Gremlins, Die Hard, Ringu, Gone With the Wind, It's a Wonderful Life, That Sinking Feeling, Performance, Frankenstein, The Innocents and The Snowman are a few of many showing over the coming weeks.

Re: last movie you watched

Sat Nov 02, 2013 11:03 pm

greystoke wrote:Also, rocknroller, keep an eye out for some great films at the GFT this month and next -- Gremlins, Die Hard, Ringu, Gone With the Wind, It's a Wonderful Life, That Sinking Feeling, Performance, Frankenstein, The Innocents and The Snowman are a few of many showing over the coming weeks.



Cheers for the info i always forget about the GFT,some classic's there mate !!!

Re: last movie you watched

Fri Nov 08, 2013 10:34 pm

Fate of Lee Khan , 4.5/6

Some prominent man visits a guest house , he has secret invasion plans that must not end up in wrong hands.

Re: last movie you watched

Sat Nov 09, 2013 7:32 am

greystoke wrote:I saw Thor: The Dark World at the cinema today. The latest film from Marvel studios and a step closer to the forthcoming Avengers: Age of Ultron. Picking up after the events in the first Avengers film, but allowing itself a prologue in which the threat of Malekith and a race of dark elves is detailed, Thor: The Dark World is - as the title suggests - a darker affair than the first film and more bleak than any Marvel film in recent memory, save for The Wolverine. Much of this film is set in Asgard, with a rain-soaked London making a soggy alternative to New York, as Thor's love interest, Jane Foster, and Stellan Skarsgard's Dr. Erik Selvig, have convened there for further research into astrophysics. Chris Hemsworth is more than perfect in his third outing as the God of Thunder, although, the ever-excellent, Tom Hiddleston steals every scene he appears in as Thor's brother, Loki. And here lies a key dynamic of the film, Thor and Loki's complex relationship intertwined with the impending, and ultimate, threat of Christopher Eccleston's Malekith. A villain who, at times, seems to have more bark than bite, despite what's at his disposal. But there's danger abound within a busy, unrelenting narrative that affords some welcome levity and in-jokes despite the severe tone. Those staying behind for the obligatory end credits scene should wait until the last credits roll for a second scene.


Nice review as usual. I thought the film being a superhero genre is too dark for kids. I never expected to see Star Wars scene in Asgard and Nosferatu (Malekith). I must be over-saturated with this genre.

Re: last movie you watched

Sat Nov 09, 2013 7:59 am

Just got back, tonight.

Image

I don't want to spoil it, and frankly, I can't tell you how it ends, because . . . well, you'll see. But there is something I want to say.

That Redford, who is 77 years old, is one tough SOB! The part could have gone to anyone of any age, but he did it. And he DID it.

But I have a confession. I wasn't totally concentrating on just the film, or its symbolism, etc. Redford being born in 1936, and watching the scenes in this unrelenting film, I must admit that I just couldn't help thinking about Elvis, whose film career ended just as Redford's was taking flight. Here he is, in the age of smartphones, IPods and Kindles, books and music that magically fly through the air . . . and smart TVs, and social media, and all kinds of things Elvis would have so enjoyed, just so physically PRESENT that I couldn't get Elvis out of my mind, as much as I just wanted to enjoy the film. It was all so unnecessary to die. There was so much life to live! And Redford is living it, NOW, to the fullest! NOW!

All was not lost over 36 years ago . . . I kept thinking "why?" I shouldn't have been thinking of him, and I certainly don't begrudge Redford his fine physical condition and ripe talent, but what fan can watch Redford in this film, climbing the mast, and NOT think of him? The loss, the waste . . .

As I said, great film. Recommended!

rjm

Re: last movie you watched

Sat Nov 09, 2013 5:03 pm

Tang Lungs side kick wrote:Fate of Lee Khan , 4.5/6

Some prominent man visits a guest house , he has secret invasion plans that must not end up in wrong hands.

That's a very good film and a great cast. It's not entirely dissimilar to King Hu's previously released, Dragon Gate Inn. Both represent Hu at his finest and I'd love to see this great looking film on Blu-ray. But the balance of narrative with action, purpose and characterisation is terrific here. Hu was especially forward-thinking with regards to the role of female characters in his films. Whilst Sammo's choreography bore many of the hallmarks that typified the likes of Hapkido and his burgeoning credentials. Angela Mao could have been used to better effect on the whole, but that's a small gripe.

Re: last movie you watched

Sat Nov 09, 2013 6:48 pm

rjm wrote:Just got back, tonight.

Image

I don't want to spoil it, and frankly, I can't tell you how it ends, because . . . well, you'll see. But there is something I want to say.

That Redford, who is 77 years old, is one tough SOB! The part could have gone to anyone of any age, but he did it. And he DID it.

But I have a confession. I wasn't totally concentrating on just the film, or its symbolism, etc. Redford being born in 1936, and watching the scenes in this unrelenting film, I must admit that I just couldn't help thinking about Elvis, whose film career ended just as Redford's was taking flight. Here he is, in the age of smartphones, IPods and Kindles, books and music that magically fly through the air . . . and smart TVs, and social media, and all kinds of things Elvis would have so enjoyed, just so physically PRESENT that I couldn't get Elvis out of my mind, as much as I just wanted to enjoy the film. It was all so unnecessary to die. There was so much life to live! And Redford is living it, NOW, to the fullest! NOW!

All was not lost over 36 years ago . . . I kept thinking "why?" I shouldn't have been thinking of him, and I certainly don't begrudge Redford his fine physical condition and ripe talent, but what fan can watch Redford in this film, climbing the mast, and NOT think of him? The loss, the waste . . .

As I said, great film. Recommended!

rjm


I'm very much looking forward to this film, rjm. Redford is another favourite of mine and I do love to see a late career gem. He's a credit to the movies and a fine actor.

Re: last movie you watched

Sun Nov 10, 2013 12:10 am

Elvisgirl wrote:cast away. i've seen it before, but i was really really bored and there was nothing else on that was worth watching. but it's been a long time since i saw it the first time, so i couldn't remember most of it. so it was good i watched it again anyway



Awesome movie hanks is amazing.

Re: last movie you watched

Sun Nov 10, 2013 11:52 am

rocknroller wrote:
Elvisgirl wrote:cast away. i've seen it before, but i was really really bored and there was nothing else on that was worth watching. but it's been a long time since i saw it the first time, so i couldn't remember most of it. so it was good i watched it again anyway



Awesome movie hanks is amazing.


You mean the one with "Wilson" the pet volleyball? Gosh, I used to think it was great, or very good. Until last night, when I saw a "similar" theme in "All Is Lost." It almost makes the Hanks picture look like a joke; I hate to say that, but this one is not only brilliant, but gets BETTER the more one reflects on it after leaving the theater.

greystoke mentioned a "late career gem." I would say it might be his career triumph. One has to watch for themselves, of course. (Wondering if he'll do another, attempting to top himself, I was reminded of Michael Phelps at the last Olympics. How can he, without falling short? One can actually do something too well.)

An odd thing happened in the theater, that is not a spoiler, so I will share it. You can't really "spoil" this one, anyway. When the screen went to black, "the end," a few people behind me spontaneously broke out in laughter - just quickly, then stopped. Perhaps they just emotionally released; there was a sense of "what the (*) just happened here?" They were adults, not kids. I guess they just didn't know *how* to react. I didn't know what to think, myself. Still don't, but I could discuss it.

You all will have to see it first, though.

rjm

Sent From My Phabulous Galaxy Note II Phablet Using Tapatalk 4

Re: last movie you watched

Sun Nov 10, 2013 3:45 pm

rjm wrote:
rocknroller wrote:
Elvisgirl wrote:cast away. i've seen it before, but i was really really bored and there was nothing else on that was worth watching. but it's been a long time since i saw it the first time, so i couldn't remember most of it. so it was good i watched it again anyway



Awesome movie hanks is amazing.


You mean the one with "Wilson" the pet volleyball? Gosh, I used to think it was great, or very good. Until last night, when I saw a "similar" theme in "All Is Lost." It almost makes the Hanks picture look like a joke; I hate to say that, but this one is not only brilliant, but gets BETTER the more one reflects on it after leaving the theater.

greystoke mentioned a "late career gem." I would say it might be his career triumph. One has to watch for themselves, of course. (Wondering if he'll do another, attempting to top himself, I was reminded of Michael Phelps at the last Olympics. How can he, without falling short? One can actually do something too well.)

An odd thing happened in the theater, that is not a spoiler, so I will share it. You can't really "spoil" this one, anyway. When the screen went to black, "the end," a few people behind me spontaneously broke out in laughter - just quickly, then stopped. Perhaps they just emotionally released; there was a sense of "what the (*) just happened here?" They were adults, not kids. I guess they just didn't know *how* to react. I didn't know what to think, myself. Still don't, but I could discuss it.

You all will have to see it first, though.

rjm

Sent From My Phabulous Galaxy Note II Phablet Using Tapatalk 4



Yes the one "Wilson" the pet volleyball,i love this movie and it is all so directed by robert zemeckis one of my all time fav directors.can't comment on All Is Lost as i have not seen it but it must be great if you say its better than castaway !!!

Re: last movie you watched

Sun Nov 10, 2013 8:10 pm

Today I saw gravity,a fantastic film,space looks so cold and lonely

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Re: last movie you watched

Sun Nov 10, 2013 9:20 pm

I've always liked Cast Away, too, but haven't seen it in several years. It's a film I'll have to re-visit on Blu-ray. I've always like Robert Zemeckis as a director and rate Tom Hanks as highly as any actor, ever!

Re: last movie you watched

Sun Nov 10, 2013 9:55 pm

greystoke wrote:I've always liked Cast Away, too, but haven't seen it in several years. It's a film I'll have to re-visit on Blu-ray. I've always like Robert Zemeckis as a director and rate Tom Hanks as highly as any actor, ever!
:smt023


I went to see Philomena enjoyed it and very funny,also seen captain phillips and loved it what a movie ! and tom hanks what can i say amazing !!!


Ken im looking forward to seeing gravity hopefully see it this week along with thor.

Re: last movie you watched

Sun Nov 10, 2013 10:09 pm

rocknroller wrote:
greystoke wrote:I've always liked Cast Away, too, but haven't seen it in several years. It's a film I'll have to re-visit on Blu-ray. I've always like Robert Zemeckis as a director and rate Tom Hanks as highly as any actor, ever!
:smt023


I went to see Philomena enjoyed it and very funny,also seen captain phillips and loved it what a movie ! and tom hanks what can i say amazing !!!


Ken im looking forward to seeing gravity hopefully see it this week along with thor.


I'm glad you enjoyed Philomena. I'm sure it will remain memorable. Hanks really is outstanding in Captain Phillips. Which is a stellar film. What a great year 2013 has turned out to be for cinema.