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Elvis and Shirley MacLaine ?

Fri Nov 01, 2013 3:49 am

I posted this a few days ago, but it got buried within another thread, so I thought it could be worth posting it again by itself :

On July 2, 1956, while Elvis was in New York at one of his greatest recording sessions ever, the "St. Petersburg Times" made a brief mention about a Hal Wallis movie project that supposedly linked Elvis to Shirley MacLaine. Never heard this one before !

By the way, Shirley's only child, Stephanie (aka "Sachi"), was born September 1, 1956.

560702 -.JPG


Here's some great photos showing Elvis with Shirley, Dean Martin and Hal Wallis, celebrating Martin's 43rd. birthday, taken during the making of "G.I. Blues", June 7, 1960 :

http://www.elvis-collectors.com/candid-central/dean60.html
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

Re: Elvis and Shirley MacLaine ?

Fri Nov 01, 2013 3:53 am

Dean loved Elvis very, very much! :wink:

Re: Elvis and Shirley MacLaine ?

Fri Nov 01, 2013 4:06 am

That's just brilliant Stalin and Elvis together side by side.I almost thought for a second that Elvis was being lined up to play Uncle Joe in a biopic :lol:

Wonder what songs would have been done in this light hearted musical biopic ?

He's Your Uncle Not Your Dad perhaps :sosorry:

Stay Away Joe. (sorry that's even worse)


norrie

Re: Elvis and Shirley MacLaine ?

Fri Nov 01, 2013 4:11 am

Mister Moon wrote:I posted this a few days ago, but it got buried within another thread, so I thought it could be worth posting it again by itself :

On July 2, 1956, while Elvis was in New York at one of his greatest recording sessions ever, the "St. Petersburg Times" made a brief mention about a Hal Wallis movie project that supposedly linked Elvis to Shirley MacLaine. Never heard this one before !

By the way, Shirley's only child, Stephanie (aka "Sachi"), was born September 1, 1956.

560702 -.JPG


Here's some great photos showing Elvis with Shirley, Dean Martin and Hal Wallis, celebrating Martin's 43rd. birthday, taken during the making of "G.I. Blues", June 7, 1960 :

http://www.elvis-collectors.com/candid-central/dean60.html
Dean was a wonderfully handsome man.

Re: Elvis and Shirley MacLaine ?

Fri Nov 01, 2013 4:16 am

bunnygirl wrote:
Mister Moon wrote:I posted this a few days ago, but it got buried within another thread, so I thought it could be worth posting it again by itself :

On July 2, 1956, while Elvis was in New York at one of his greatest recording sessions ever, the "St. Petersburg Times" made a brief mention about a Hal Wallis movie project that supposedly linked Elvis to Shirley MacLaine. Never heard this one before !

By the way, Shirley's only child, Stephanie (aka "Sachi"), was born September 1, 1956.

560702 -.JPG


Here's some great photos showing Elvis with Shirley, Dean Martin and Hal Wallis, celebrating Martin's 43rd. birthday, taken during the making of "G.I. Blues", June 7, 1960 :

http://www.elvis-collectors.com/candid-central/dean60.html


Dean was a wonderfully handsome man.


Well, of all the four in those pics, I prefer Shirley ! :wink:

Re: Elvis and Shirley MacLaine ?

Fri Nov 01, 2013 4:20 am

Thanks Mister Moon, i have only seen 2 of those photos of Elvis with Dean and Shirley before, cool. Its too bad that there is no film of Elvis and Dean together in any kind of setting, especially singing together. Dean has always been a big favorite of mine, i have all his records also. :wink:

Re: Elvis and Shirley MacLaine ?

Fri Nov 01, 2013 4:23 am

Mister Moon wrote:
bunnygirl wrote:
Mister Moon wrote:I posted this a few days ago, but it got buried within another thread, so I thought it could be worth posting it again by itself :

On July 2, 1956, while Elvis was in New York at one of his greatest recording sessions ever, the "St. Petersburg Times" made a brief mention about a Hal Wallis movie project that supposedly linked Elvis to Shirley MacLaine. Never heard this one before !

By the way, Shirley's only child, Stephanie (aka "Sachi"), was born September 1, 1956.

560702 -.JPG


Here's some great photos showing Elvis with Shirley, Dean Martin and Hal Wallis, celebrSating Martin's 43rd. birthday, taken during the making of "G.I. Blues", June 7, 1960 :

http://www.elvis-collectors.com/candid-central/dean60.html


Dean was a wonderfully handsome man.


Well, of all the four in those pics, I prefer Shirley ! :wink:



Great pics though.
And yes Shirley for me and I couldn't care less if you saw her first,I called "dibs"


norrie

Re: Elvis and Shirley MacLaine ?

Fri Nov 01, 2013 4:23 am

norrie wrote:That's just brilliant Stalin and Elvis together side by side.I almost thought for a second that Elvis was being lined up to play Uncle Joe in a biopic :lol:

Wonder what songs would have been done in this light hearted musical biopic ?

He's Your Uncle Not Your Dad perhaps :sosorry:

Stay Away Joe. (sorry that's even worse)



This could have been a good one for this musical, if it had already been composed ! :

"Talkin' John Birch Paranoid Blues" - Bob Dylan - 1963 (written 1962)

phpBB [video]



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talkin'_John_Birch_Paranoid_Blues

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Birch_Society

Re: Elvis and Shirley MacLaine ?

Fri Nov 01, 2013 4:24 am

SUN-RCA wrote:Thanks Mister Moon, i have only seen 2 of those photos of Elvis with Dean and Shirley before, cool. Its too bad that there is no film of Elvis and Dean together in any kind of setting, especially singing together. Dean has always been a big favorite of mine, i have all his records also. :wink:


You're welcome, SUN-RCA !

Re: Elvis and Shirley MacLaine ?

Fri Nov 01, 2013 4:25 am

Mister Moon wrote:
norrie wrote:That's just brilliant Stalin and Elvis together side by side.I almost thought for a second that Elvis was being lined up to play Uncle Joe in a biopic :lol:

Wonder what songs would have been done in this light hearted musical biopic ?

He's Your Uncle Not Your Dad perhaps :sosorry:

Stay Away Joe. (sorry that's even worse)



This could have been a good one for this musical, if it had already been composed ! :

"Talkin' John Birch Paranoid Blues" - Bob Dylan - 1963 (written 1962)

phpBB [video]



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talkin'_John_Birch_Paranoid_Blues

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Birch_Society




Perfect !

Re: Elvis and Shirley MacLaine ?

Mon Nov 04, 2013 12:21 am

Mister Moon wrote:I posted this a few days ago, but it got buried within another thread, so I thought it could be worth posting it again by itself :

On July 2, 1956, while Elvis was in New York at one of his greatest recording sessions ever, the "St. Petersburg Times" made a brief mention about a Hal Wallis movie project that supposedly linked Elvis to Shirley MacLaine. Never heard this one before !

By the way, Shirley's only child, Stephanie (aka "Sachi"), was born September 1, 1956.

Image



To answer your query, here are my thoughts.

In April 1956 Hal Wallis tested and apparently initially cast Elvis in Burt Lancaster and Katherine Hepburn's "The Rainmaker" -- then changed his mind and slotted Earl Holliman in the role. It must have been wise, as Holliman won the Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actor in 1957. Obviously, Wallis was looking for the best way to utilize the young singing star and novice actor.

MacLaine's next job for Wallis at Paramount was "Hot Spell," a drama that Wallis had optioned in June 1956 from an unproduced play. This is most likely the project Louella Parsons was referring to in her gossip column.

Hot Spell (1958)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0051742/

It appears Elvis and Shirley would have portrayed siblings in this film, which starred Shirley Booth and Anthony Quinn, and directed by Daniel Mann. It was made at the same time as "Loving You," and Elvis visited the set at least once, probably because he was dating cast member Valerie Allen. Ironically, the part Elvis might have had in "Hot Spell" went to Earl Holliman again!


Image

With actress Valerie Allen - February 1957
On the set of Paramount's "Hot Spell"


You may read more about Elvis on the set of "Hot Spell" here:

When Elvis Stole Actress Eileen Heckart's Paper !
http://www.elvis-collectors.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=75338

Re: Elvis and Shirley MacLaine ?

Mon Nov 04, 2013 1:15 am

Thanks for the information, Doc. It's nice to learn about these little "hidden" stories.

Regarding Earl Holliman, he may be not too well known, but anybody who's appeared in "Giant", alongside James Dean and Dennis Hopper, in "Forbidden Planet", and starred the first ever episode of "The Twilight Zone", has all of my respects ! :D

Thanks again !

HOPPER, HUDSON, HOLLIMAN.JPG
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

Re: Elvis and Shirley MacLaine ?

Mon Nov 04, 2013 2:57 am

HoneyTalkNelson wrote:Dean loved Elvis very, very much! :wink:

And Elvis loved Dean very, very much!

Re: Elvis and Shirley MacLaine ?

Mon Nov 04, 2013 7:49 am

Dean must have been very charming, as watching women relate to him, they just wanted to hug him and be close.

Re: Elvis and Shirley MacLaine ?

Mon Nov 04, 2013 6:24 pm

Your thoughts are about as on the money as they could be, Doc. With Elvis and Shirley MacLaine both contracted to work for Hal Wallis at this time, the only project that could appropriate Louella Parson’s article would be, of course, Hot Spell. A film based not on an unproduced play, but on Lonnie Coleman’s Next of Kin. Hot Spell came to reunite Wallis with director Daniel Mann, and the film’s female lead, Shirley Booth, whose performance here is not dissimilar to what she accomplished in the superior, Come Back, Little Sheba. Had Elvis been involved in Hot Spell, his presence would likely have secured the kind of box office revenue this pseudo-Tennessee Williams drama missed, although, Shirley MacLaine gave a performance of genuine star quality among a cast that outdone themselves with some tepid material. Elvis may have been better cast as Jim Curry in The Rainmaker, but with a star vehicle being sought for his more obvious talents, certain potential and tremendous popularity, Wallis was surely vindicated in producing the box office success that was Loving You, whilst ensuring Elvis the lead role in a quality production like King Creole.

Earl Holliman, who was ultimately given the role of Jim Curry in The Rainmaker, was indeed a fine actor and worked several times for Hal Wallis in the fifties and sixties -- The Rainmaker and Hot Spell, of course, but also Gunfight at the O.K. Corral, Last Train from Gun Hill and The Sons of Katie Elder. In The Rainmaker, he was ideally cast and impressed with a performance that blended with those of Lloyd Bridges, Katherine Hepburn and Burt Lancaster, who dominated every scene he was in and done so in such a fashion that Elvis, as a first-time actor, with no experience, would surely have been dwarfed next to his personality and screen-presence. However, it’s likely that more roles and potential movie projects than we’re aware of found Elvis’s name circled or discussed with interest. Especially during the fifties and early sixties, when his potential was being tapped and quality productions were being afforded a young leading man with legitimate box office appeal.

Re: Elvis and Shirley MacLaine ?

Mon Nov 04, 2013 7:08 pm

greystoke wrote:Your thoughts are about as on the money as they could be, Doc. With Elvis and Shirley MacLaine both contracted to work for Hal Wallis at this time, the only project that could appropriate Louella Parson’s article would be, of course, Hot Spell. A film based not on an unproduced play, but on Lonnie Coleman’s Next of Kin. Hot Spell came to reunite Wallis with director Daniel Mann, and the film’s female lead, Shirley Booth, whose performance here is not dissimilar to what she accomplished in the superior, Come Back, Little Sheba. Had Elvis been involved in Hot Spell, his presence would likely have secured the kind of box office revenue this pseudo-Tennessee Williams drama missed, although, Shirley MacLaine gave a performance of genuine star quality among a cast that outdone themselves with some tepid material. Elvis may have been better cast as Jim Curry in The Rainmaker, but with a star vehicle being sought for his more obvious talents, certain potential and tremendous popularity, Wallis was surely vindicated in producing the box office success that was Loving You, whilst ensuring Elvis the lead role in a quality production like King Creole.

Earl Holliman, who was ultimately given the role of Jim Curry in The Rainmaker, was indeed a fine actor and worked several times for Hal Wallis in the fifties and sixties -- The Rainmaker and Hot Spell, of course, but also Gunfight at the O.K. Corral, Last Train from Gun Hill and The Sons of Katie Elder. In The Rainmaker, he was ideally cast and impressed with a performance that blended with those of Lloyd Bridges, Katherine Hepburn and Burt Lancaster, who dominated every scene he was in and done so in such a fashion that Elvis, as a first-time actor, with no experience, would surely have been dwarfed next to his personality and screen-presence. However, it’s likely that more roles and potential movie projects than we’re aware of found Elvis’s name circled or discussed with interest. Especially during the fifties and early sixties, when his potential was being tapped and quality productions were being afforded a young leading man with legitimate box office appeal.


Thanks for your post, greystoke !

Re: Elvis and Shirley MacLaine ?

Tue Nov 05, 2013 2:46 am

greystoke wrote:Your thoughts are about as on the money as they could be, Doc. With Elvis and Shirley MacLaine both contracted to work for Hal Wallis at this time, the only project that could appropriate Louella Parson’s article would be, of course, Hot Spell. A film based not on an unproduced play, but on Lonnie Coleman’s Next of Kin. Hot Spell came to reunite Wallis with director Daniel Mann, and the film’s female lead, Shirley Booth, whose performance here is not dissimilar to what she accomplished in the superior, Come Back, Little Sheba. Had Elvis been involved in Hot Spell, his presence would likely have secured the kind of box office revenue this pseudo-Tennessee Williams drama missed, although, Shirley MacLaine gave a performance of genuine star quality among a cast that outdone themselves with some tepid material. Elvis may have been better cast as Jim Curry in The Rainmaker, but with a star vehicle being sought for his more obvious talents, certain potential and tremendous popularity, Wallis was surely vindicated in producing the box office success that was Loving You, whilst ensuring Elvis the lead role in a quality production like King Creole.

Earl Holliman, who was ultimately given the role of Jim Curry in The Rainmaker, was indeed a fine actor and worked several times for Hal Wallis in the fifties and sixties -- The Rainmaker and Hot Spell, of course, but also Gunfight at the O.K. Corral, Last Train from Gun Hill and The Sons of Katie Elder. In The Rainmaker, he was ideally cast and impressed with a performance that blended with those of Lloyd Bridges, Katherine Hepburn and Burt Lancaster, who dominated every scene he was in and done so in such a fashion that Elvis, as a first-time actor, with no experience, would surely have been dwarfed next to his personality and screen-presence. However, it’s likely that more roles and potential movie projects than we’re aware of found Elvis’s name circled or discussed with interest. Especially during the fifties and early sixties, when his potential was being tapped and quality productions were being afforded a young leading man with legitimate box office appeal.


Thanks for the kind words.

Re: Elvis and Shirley MacLaine ?

Tue Nov 05, 2013 5:34 am

I am currently enjoying watching Earl Holliman in the DVD season sets of Police Woman with Angie Dickinson.

Re: Elvis and Shirley MacLaine ?

Tue Nov 05, 2013 8:51 am

greystoke wrote:Your thoughts are about as on the money as they could be, Doc. With Elvis and Shirley MacLaine both contracted to work for Hal Wallis at this time, the only project that could appropriate Louella Parson’s article would be, of course, Hot Spell. A film based not on an unproduced play, but on Lonnie Coleman’s Next of Kin. Hot Spell came to reunite Wallis with director Daniel Mann, and the film’s female lead, Shirley Booth, whose performance here is not dissimilar to what she accomplished in the superior, Come Back, Little Sheba. Had Elvis been involved in Hot Spell, his presence would likely have secured the kind of box office revenue this pseudo-Tennessee Williams drama missed, although, Shirley MacLaine gave a performance of genuine star quality among a cast that outdone themselves with some tepid material. Elvis may have been better cast as Jim Curry in The Rainmaker, but with a star vehicle being sought for his more obvious talents, certain potential and tremendous popularity, Wallis was surely vindicated in producing the box office success that was Loving You, whilst ensuring Elvis the lead role in a quality production like King Creole.

Earl Holliman, who was ultimately given the role of Jim Curry in The Rainmaker, was indeed a fine actor and worked several times for Hal Wallis in the fifties and sixties -- The Rainmaker and Hot Spell, of course, but also Gunfight at the O.K. Corral, Last Train from Gun Hill and The Sons of Katie Elder. In The Rainmaker, he was ideally cast and impressed with a performance that blended with those of Lloyd Bridges, Katherine Hepburn and Burt Lancaster, who dominated every scene he was in and done so in such a fashion that Elvis, as a first-time actor, with no experience, would surely have been dwarfed next to his personality and screen-presence. However, it’s likely that more roles and potential movie projects than we’re aware of found Elvis’s name circled or discussed with interest. Especially during the fifties and early sixties, when his potential was being tapped and quality productions were being afforded a young leading man with legitimate box office appeal.


Excellent post, once again, greystoke. Thanks.

If we were to ask "what happened, then?" I guess it should be evident: if he hadn't been drafted, it's quite likely his career might have taken a different trajectory. We cannot blame Earl Holliman. This was the "opening" for the execution of the notion that Elvis should appeal to "the whole family" (including Grandpa), and that he should be made inoffensive to anyone. (Although there were a few stalwarts who were indeed "offended.") If Parker, and Wallis, by the way, didn't have the time to think it over for two years, while rock and roll musicians and DJs were under very active assault, perhaps it never would have happened.

After he returned, the entire shape of his career changed: while he did a very few more personal appearances, that was soon brought to a halt. No more live Elvis. And this cannot be what he wanted. He enjoyed performing live. But that was over. In the '50s, his career was mixed with some films, personal appearances, and music. And the soundtracks were top-notch. It all changed.

When he returned, he made two sincere and "real" albums (EIB and His Hand In Mine), and the same year, a movie album with songs he likely would not have chosen were they not in a film. You really cannot say that for much of the music in the '50s films. Yes, Love Me Tender had three songs with which he wasn't pleased, but that changed, and improved. After he returned, no one seemed to pay any mind at all to what he wanted.

In fact, although I don't want to bring up G.I. Blues right now, but the fact is Wallis brought his crew to Germany, before Elvis was released, and just started in with his film. I have to look into it, but I believe this caught Elvis a bit by surprise. So, he didn't have much to say.

It wasn't that he "died when he went into the Army," because that's not true, but those two years of inactivity gave the power brokers around him much too much time to think. While he had very little: he was kept busy. It's a shame. I think it affected his future (and also the lack thereof, at a certain point) in profound ways.

rjm
P.S. -- Yes, I remember Holliman most from TV. Police Woman. And I think something else. Was he in Bewitched? I think he was.

Re: Elvis and Shirley MacLaine ?

Tue Nov 05, 2013 12:50 pm

rjm wrote:Excellent post, once again, greystoke. Thanks.

If we were to ask "what happened, then?" I guess it should be evident: if he hadn't been drafted, it's quite likely his career might have taken a different trajectory. We cannot blame Earl Holliman. This was the "opening" for the execution of the notion that Elvis should appeal to "the whole family" (including Grandpa), and that he should be made inoffensive to anyone. (Although there were a few stalwarts who were indeed "offended.") If Parker, and Wallis, by the way, didn't have the time to think it over for two years, while rock and roll musicians and DJs were under very active assault, perhaps it never would have happened.appearances, and music. And the soundtracks were top-notch. It all changed.

When he returned, he made two sincere and "real" albums (EIB and His Hand In Mine), and the same year, a movie album with songs he likely would not have chosen were they not in a film. You really cannot say that for much of the music in the '50s films. Yes, Love Me Tender had three songs with which he wasn't pleased, but that changed, and improved. After he returned, no one seemed to pay any mind at all to what he wanted.

In fact, although I don't want to bring up G.I. Blues right now, but the fact is Wallis brought his crew to Germany, before Elvis was released, and just started in with his film. I have to look into it, but I believe this caught Elvis a bit by surprise. So, he didn't have much to say.

It wasn't that he "died when he went into the Army," because that's not true, but those two years of inactivity gave the power brokers around him much too much time to think. While he had very little: he was kept busy. It's a shame. I think it affected his future (and also the lack thereof, at a certain point) in profound ways.

rjm
P.S. -- Yes, I remember Holliman most from TV. Police Woman. And I think something else. Was he in Bewitched? I think he was.


Good follow-up. As for Holliman, he has appeared in many series between 1957 and 2010, most recently on the syndicated 1997-1999 series "Night Man":

Night Man
http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0391096/filmoseries
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Night_Man

Re: Elvis and Shirley MacLaine ?

Tue Nov 05, 2013 11:08 pm

Hi there!! :D :D :D.

Mister Mike wrote:
HoneyTalkNelson wrote:Dean loved Elvis very, very much! :wink:

And Elvis loved Dean very, very much!


They loved each other very, very much! smt174. Bye for now :smt006.

Re: Elvis and Shirley MacLaine ?

Tue Nov 05, 2013 11:58 pm

rjm wrote:
greystoke wrote:Your thoughts are about as on the money as they could be, Doc. With Elvis and Shirley MacLaine both contracted to work for Hal Wallis at this time, the only project that could appropriate Louella Parson’s article would be, of course, Hot Spell. A film based not on an unproduced play, but on Lonnie Coleman’s Next of Kin. Hot Spell came to reunite Wallis with director Daniel Mann, and the film’s female lead, Shirley Booth, whose performance here is not dissimilar to what she accomplished in the superior, Come Back, Little Sheba. Had Elvis been involved in Hot Spell, his presence would likely have secured the kind of box office revenue this pseudo-Tennessee Williams drama missed, although, Shirley MacLaine gave a performance of genuine star quality among a cast that outdone themselves with some tepid material. Elvis may have been better cast as Jim Curry in The Rainmaker, but with a star vehicle being sought for his more obvious talents, certain potential and tremendous popularity, Wallis was surely vindicated in producing the box office success that was Loving You, whilst ensuring Elvis the lead role in a quality production like King Creole.

Earl Holliman, who was ultimately given the role of Jim Curry in The Rainmaker, was indeed a fine actor and worked several times for Hal Wallis in the fifties and sixties -- The Rainmaker and Hot Spell, of course, but also Gunfight at the O.K. Corral, Last Train from Gun Hill and The Sons of Katie Elder. In The Rainmaker, he was ideally cast and impressed with a performance that blended with those of Lloyd Bridges, Katherine Hepburn and Burt Lancaster, who dominated every scene he was in and done so in such a fashion that Elvis, as a first-time actor, with no experience, would surely have been dwarfed next to his personality and screen-presence. However, it’s likely that more roles and potential movie projects than we’re aware of found Elvis’s name circled or discussed with interest. Especially during the fifties and early sixties, when his potential was being tapped and quality productions were being afforded a young leading man with legitimate box office appeal.


Excellent post, once again, greystoke. Thanks.

If we were to ask "what happened, then?" I guess it should be evident: if he hadn't been drafted, it's quite likely his career might have taken a different trajectory. We cannot blame Earl Holliman. This was the "opening" for the execution of the notion that Elvis should appeal to "the whole family" (including Grandpa), and that he should be made inoffensive to anyone. (Although there were a few stalwarts who were indeed "offended.") If Parker, and Wallis, by the way, didn't have the time to think it over for two years, while rock and roll musicians and DJs were under very active assault, perhaps it never would have happened.

After he returned, the entire shape of his career changed: while he did a very few more personal appearances, that was soon brought to a halt. No more live Elvis. And this cannot be what he wanted. He enjoyed performing live. But that was over. In the '50s, his career was mixed with some films, personal appearances, and music. And the soundtracks were top-notch. It all changed.

When he returned, he made two sincere and "real" albums (EIB and His Hand In Mine), and the same year, a movie album with songs he likely would not have chosen were they not in a film. You really cannot say that for much of the music in the '50s films. Yes, Love Me Tender had three songs with which he wasn't pleased, but that changed, and improved. After he returned, no one seemed to pay any mind at all to what he wanted.

In fact, although I don't want to bring up G.I. Blues right now, but the fact is Wallis brought his crew to Germany, before Elvis was released, and just started in with his film. I have to look into it, but I believe this caught Elvis a bit by surprise. So, he didn't have much to say.

It wasn't that he "died when he went into the Army," because that's not true, but those two years of inactivity gave the power brokers around him much too much time to think. While he had very little: he was kept busy. It's a shame. I think it affected his future (and also the lack thereof, at a certain point) in profound ways.rjm
P.S. -- Yes, I remember Holliman most from TV. Police Woman. And I think something else. Was he in Bewitched? I think he was.

Yes Elvis went into the service with good reviews for King Creole and the knowledge that "if" rock and roll did actually die-he was on his way to becoming a serious actor.
Parker and Wallis really had no intentions of furthering Elvis' ambitions for acting-they wanted the paydays and profits the musicals could bring. Elvis made his ambitions well known and trusted these men-but they had other ideas.
Parker told Bob Neal (according to a new biography for Johnny Cash) that he had little faith in rock music having staying power and movies were the place to make some money. Neal was associated with Cash at the time and Parker pointed Neal in Hollywoods direction for Cash.

Re: Elvis and Shirley MacLaine ?

Wed Nov 06, 2013 5:10 pm

Epkp wrote:
rjm wrote:
greystoke wrote:Your thoughts are about as on the money as they could be, Doc. With Elvis and Shirley MacLaine both contracted to work for Hal Wallis at this time, the only project that could appropriate Louella Parson’s article would be, of course, Hot Spell. A film based not on an unproduced play, but on Lonnie Coleman’s Next of Kin. Hot Spell came to reunite Wallis with director Daniel Mann, and the film’s female lead, Shirley Booth, whose performance here is not dissimilar to what she accomplished in the superior, Come Back, Little Sheba. Had Elvis been involved in Hot Spell, his presence would likely have secured the kind of box office revenue this pseudo-Tennessee Williams drama missed, although, Shirley MacLaine gave a performance of genuine star quality among a cast that outdone themselves with some tepid material. Elvis may have been better cast as Jim Curry in The Rainmaker, but with a star vehicle being sought for his more obvious talents, certain potential and tremendous popularity, Wallis was surely vindicated in producing the box office success that was Loving You, whilst ensuring Elvis the lead role in a quality production like King Creole.

Earl Holliman, who was ultimately given the role of Jim Curry in The Rainmaker, was indeed a fine actor and worked several times for Hal Wallis in the fifties and sixties -- The Rainmaker and Hot Spell, of course, but also Gunfight at the O.K. Corral, Last Train from Gun Hill and The Sons of Katie Elder. In The Rainmaker, he was ideally cast and impressed with a performance that blended with those of Lloyd Bridges, Katherine Hepburn and Burt Lancaster, who dominated every scene he was in and done so in such a fashion that Elvis, as a first-time actor, with no experience, would surely have been dwarfed next to his personality and screen-presence. However, it’s likely that more roles and potential movie projects than we’re aware of found Elvis’s name circled or discussed with interest. Especially during the fifties and early sixties, when his potential was being tapped and quality productions were being afforded a young leading man with legitimate box office appeal.


Excellent post, once again, greystoke. Thanks.

If we were to ask "what happened, then?" I guess it should be evident: if he hadn't been drafted, it's quite likely his career might have taken a different trajectory. We cannot blame Earl Holliman. This was the "opening" for the execution of the notion that Elvis should appeal to "the whole family" (including Grandpa), and that he should be made inoffensive to anyone. (Although there were a few stalwarts who were indeed "offended.") If Parker, and Wallis, by the way, didn't have the time to think it over for two years, while rock and roll musicians and DJs were under very active assault, perhaps it never would have happened.

After he returned, the entire shape of his career changed: while he did a very few more personal appearances, that was soon brought to a halt. No more live Elvis. And this cannot be what he wanted. He enjoyed performing live. But that was over. In the '50s, his career was mixed with some films, personal appearances, and music. And the soundtracks were top-notch. It all changed.

When he returned, he made two sincere and "real" albums (EIB and His Hand In Mine), and the same year, a movie album with songs he likely would not have chosen were they not in a film. You really cannot say that for much of the music in the '50s films. Yes, Love Me Tender had three songs with which he wasn't pleased, but that changed, and improved. After he returned, no one seemed to pay any mind at all to what he wanted.

In fact, although I don't want to bring up G.I. Blues right now, but the fact is Wallis brought his crew to Germany, before Elvis was released, and just started in with his film. I have to look into it, but I believe this caught Elvis a bit by surprise. So, he didn't have much to say.

It wasn't that he "died when he went into the Army," because that's not true, but those two years of inactivity gave the power brokers around him much too much time to think. While he had very little: he was kept busy. It's a shame. I think it affected his future (and also the lack thereof, at a certain point) in profound ways.rjm
P.S. -- Yes, I remember Holliman most from TV. Police Woman. And I think something else. Was he in Bewitched? I think he was.

Yes Elvis went into the service with good reviews for King Creole and the knowledge that "if" rock and roll did actually die-he was on his way to becoming a serious actor.
Parker and Wallis really had no intentions of furthering Elvis' ambitions for acting-they wanted the paydays and profits the musicals could bring. Elvis made his ambitions well known and trusted these men-but they had other ideas.
Parker told Bob Neal (according to a new biography for Johnny Cash) that he had little faith in rock music having staying power and movies were the place to make some money. Neal was associated with Cash at the time and Parker pointed Neal in Hollywoods direction for Cash.

It's shameful that Wallis and Parker, by casting him in these roles, held Elvis back. He could have developed into a serious actor, thus insuring a longer, better paying career. What were they thinking, other than making a quick buck? It's almost as though he was just a "disposable actor" to them.

Re: Elvis and Shirley MacLaine ?

Wed Nov 06, 2013 9:20 pm

bunnygirl wrote:It's shameful that Wallis and Parker, by casting him in these roles, held Elvis back. He could have developed into a serious actor, thus insuring a longer, better paying career. What were they thinking, other than making a quick buck? It's almost as though he was just a "disposable actor" to them.


What is most shameful is Elvis didn't say "no."

Re: Elvis and Shirley MacLaine ?

Wed Nov 06, 2013 10:15 pm

When it came to singing Elvis had an instinct-a feel-a natural ability that overcame his lack of formal training or ability to read music by sight.
Unfortunately Elvis did not have that instinct and natural ability for other aspects of show business and personal relationships.
Parker, the self proclaimed Snowman, very early on saw Elvis as someone whos insecurities were easy to harness.
Elvis respected and trusted Parker-Parker was to steer the path that Elvis took in his show business career...Parker must have convinced Elvis that the Wallis long term picture deal was good.
Wallis also was known for grabbing what was hot and making as much money as he could from that hot item-Martin and Lewis were another hot item he grabbed and sucked the life out of. Dean Martin said one of the reasons he wanted out of the team was because the pictures were horrible-formula pictures that had never went beyond the basic premise of the very first film-he wanted more creatively and told Lewis and Wallis...I want out.
He broke up the act with 20 million laying on the table for future films.
Martin was not insecure-Martin did not have a "Snowman" to contend with.
Elvis had no knowledge of Hollywood, no business inclination beyond the movie mags from the drugstore-he hired Parker to handle that.
Parker just did not have Elvis' best interests at heart most of the time and he was Snowman enough to know how to pull the strings and keep Elvis thinking Parkers plan must be best.
Elvis should have dumped Parker in 64-65.
Parker was a master manipulator and proud of it-Flaming Star did not do nearly as well and Parker let Elvis know it -over and over.
Elvis should have said no-but for me its understandable how he was constantly kept in line by someone who was as instinctive at his profession as Elvis was at singing.