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Re: Why did Presley allow this?! Jack Good speaks out, 1960

Tue Nov 05, 2013 12:23 am

And it did VERY well at the boxoffice! :wink: :wink:

Re: Why did Presley allow this?! Jack Good speaks out, 1960

Tue Nov 05, 2013 12:38 am

poormadpeter wrote:(...) people still can't understand that Elvis's Hollywood career and music career wouldn't and shouldn't always go hand in hand.


Well, apart from mostly horrible pictures, fans had to swallow mostly horrible LP soundtracks as well... It was clearly designed to work complementarily.

After all, he was a singer. The acting thing came immediately after he left Sun. Unfortunately.

Re: Why did Presley allow this?! Jack Good speaks out, 1960

Tue Nov 05, 2013 12:41 am

Elvis was a singer first then a actor. and he was also a better singer than he was a actor. When Elvis was doing dramatic stuff he looked like he was acting. you are not supposed to look like u are acting. he was more natural in light comedies.

Re: Why did Presley allow this?! Jack Good speaks out, 1960

Tue Nov 05, 2013 12:43 am

DEH wrote:(...) and he was also a better singer than he was a actor. (...)


I agree with this. :wink:

Re: Why did Presley allow this?! Jack Good speaks out, 1960

Tue Nov 05, 2013 12:48 am

DEH wrote:When Elvis was doing dramatic stuff he looked like he was acting. you are not supposed to look like u are acting. he was more natural in light comedies.


I don't agree with this. Elvis' best movies were the dramatic movies he did.

Re: Why did Presley allow this?! Jack Good speaks out, 1960

Tue Nov 05, 2013 12:49 am

Some people thought he had talent. I still don't understand why he didn't take some acting lessons. It's plain awkward to watch him in Wild In The Country. The man had no technique. I do like the GI blues sound track 'though.

Re: Why did Presley allow this?! Jack Good speaks out, 1960

Tue Nov 05, 2013 12:50 am

Thanks for that Tony.Jack Good views echo that of many Elvis fans today but without the benefit of hindsight.I see it as a fairly enjoyable light-hearted musical with OK songs and can take it for what it is but I would rather Elvis had not became an all round family entertainer and remained a bad boy for a bit longer.


norrie

Re: Why did Presley allow this?! Jack Good speaks out, 1960

Tue Nov 05, 2013 12:59 am

Some directors recognized his potential: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=55990&start=150#p1226352

Re: Why did Presley allow this?! Jack Good speaks out, 1960

Tue Nov 05, 2013 1:01 am

Wiebe wrote:Some people thought he had talent. I still don't understand why he didn't take some acting lessons. It's plain awkward to watch him in Wild In The Country. The man had no technique. I do like the GI blues sound track 'though.


Wild in the Country suffers from poor script and direction too - despite the script being by the great Clifford Odets. Elvis could do little with some of the ridiculous dialogue he was forced to utter. The film is interesting, but a failure.

Re: Why did Presley allow this?! Jack Good speaks out, 1960

Tue Nov 05, 2013 1:09 am

I'm quite amazed at the tone of that cutting - not so much Jack Good's viewpoint, but the tone of the reviews in the contemporary popular press. Incidentally, the typeface makes me think the cutting was from Melody Maker, but I could well be confused over this.

For me, G.I. Blues was the right move for a new era ("music changes every six months - you gotta change with it"). It showed a different side to Elvis and displayed his talent for comedy. I was 12, and not an Elvis fan at the time, but I remember hearing Didja Ever quite a lot on the radio.

As for Wild In The Country, I think Elvis did a first class job. It's one of my favourite Elvis films.

Re: Why did Presley allow this?! Jack Good speaks out, 1960

Tue Nov 05, 2013 2:10 am

Tony.. wrote:Interesting and controversial article from 1960.
601126_Disc Magazine.jpg


It's not controversial, rather it's an example of someone seeing the reality of how bad "G.I. Blues" really was, and caring enough (or having the balls) to write about it publicly. It would be great to read the rest of the piece, and one may see it's continued on page 4.

Do you have page 4?

Also, you do not identify the date or source of the article, but it must be from Disc magazine, perhaps the 11-26-1960 issue, where Jack Good anchored a weekly column for several years. We can see a bit of Elvis in his army hat underneath the article, too.

May we see that as well?

Jack Good was a pioneering UK and US TV producer, as well as a record producer, musician and actor. Among other things, he helped to create ABC-TV's "Shindig!"



641003_Harrison_Good_Lennon_Shindig.JPG
George Harrison, Jack Good (producer), John Lennon - "Shindig" U.K. taping, Saturday, October 3, 1964



650000_Shindig promo sheet.JPG

Jack Good (producer)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack_Good_(producer)
http://www.rockabilly.nl/references/messages/jack_good.htm



Good was always forthright, not just in that spot-on review of "G.I. Blues."

Case-in-point: it seems none of you are aware that Jack played a small role in "Clambake" as Hathaway, the front desk clerk.

Well, at the April 1967 film after-party, Good spoke to Presley in the same straightforward, almost desperately earnest manner that John Lennon had done two years earlier, when the Beatles visited 565 Perugia Way. The conversation was recalled in Jerry Hopkins' 1971 biography on Elvis:

"Clambake" was one of the really, really awful ones. There was a party after the film was completed, with Lance LeGault's band playing. And Elvis wouldn't sing. Slowly, Lance got him into a blues thing, "Let It Roll" [sic]. And he was terrific. And I thought what a shame he doesn't do that sort of thing in the film. I said to Elvis, "Why do you keep making these rotten films? Why don't you do something exciting, like "King Creole"? He said he left all that to the Colonel, but that the Colonel promised something really exciting soon, real soon.

- Jack Good


Right on! Good gave a voice to what millions of fans were thinking: "why have you abandoned ship, Elvis?"

The song where Elvis joined Lance LeGault's band and rocked the house was Jimmy Reed's "Baby What You Want Me To Do," which Presley almost recorded in Nashville that August, and performed live for the NBC-TV cameras in June 1968 in stunning fashion.

Better late than never!
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Last edited by drjohncarpenter on Tue Nov 05, 2013 6:11 am, edited 1 time in total.

Re: Why did Presley allow this?! Jack Good speaks out, 1960

Tue Nov 05, 2013 2:24 am

jurasic1968 wrote:The reviewer wrote very clear, GI Blues was the first major mistake of Parker. Too bad many, many more will follow. And maybe the first major mistake of the Colonel was back in 1958 and was not to accept the Army's offer for Elvis to join and sing in the Special Services.



In Reality that was a really good move by the Col parker , Elvis proved he was a true american and done his part just like everybody else . can you imagaine the hoopla and crap elvis would have gone thru had he been gave special treatment . you have to remember that when a person got drafted he had to serve and was not gave a choice as to what he would be doing , you took the apptitude test and you got what they gave you . so if elvis had been gaven special treatment , man his life would have been pure misery. also he would have been tagged as not man enough to take it like the rest of the guy's . so i am for sure col parker made the right move and elvis did what he had to do and it not only made him more of a man but in the eyes of his country and fellow american's he more than earned all there respect . so that was a good move on parker's part . ::rocks

Re: Why did Presley allow this?! Jack Good speaks out, 1960

Tue Nov 05, 2013 2:24 am

Thanks Tony and The Doc for the info, interesting read. At least someone, at the time, saw it for what it was...

Even today, i still can not understand why Elvis let Hollywood and The Colonel destroy his career like they did.

Re: Why did Presley allow this?! Jack Good speaks out, 1960

Tue Nov 05, 2013 2:52 am

drjohncarpenter wrote:
Tony.. wrote:Interesting and controversial article from 1960.
601126_Disc Magazine.jpg


It's not controversial, rather it's an example of someone seeing the reality of how bad "G.I. Blues" really was, and caring enough (or having the balls) to write about it publicly. It would be great to read the rest of the piece, and one may see it's continued on page 4.

Do you have page 4?

Also, you do not identify the date or source of the article, but it must be from Disc magazine, perhaps the 11-26-1960 issue, where Jack Good anchored a weekly column for several years. We can see a bit of Elvis in his army hat underneath the article, too.

May we see that as well?

Jack Good was a pioneering UK and US TV producer, as well as a record producer, musician and actor. Among other things, he helped to create ABC-TV's "Shindig!"



641003_Harrison_Good_Lennon_Shindig.JPG
George Harrison, Jack Good (producer), John Lennon - "Shindig" U.K. taping, Saturday, October 3, 1964



650000_Shindig promo sheet.JPG

Jack Good (producer)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack_Good_(producer)
http://www.rockabilly.nl/references/messages/jack_good.htm



Good was always forthright, not just in that spot-on review of "G.I. Blues."

Case-in-point: it seems none of you are aware that Jack played a small role in "Clambake" as Hathaway, the front desk clerk.

Well, at the April 1967 film after-party, Good spoke to Presley in the same straightforward, almost desperately earnest manner that John Lennon had done two years earlier, when the Beatles visited 565 Perugia Way. The conversation was recalled in Jerry Hopkins' 1971 biography on Elvis:

"Clambake" was one of the really, really awful ones. There was a party after the film was completed, with Lance LeGault's band playing. And Elvis wouldn't sing. Slowly, Lance got him into a blues thing, "Let It Roll" [sic]. And he was terrific. And I thought what a shame he doesn't do that sort of thing in the film. I said to Elvis, "Why do you keep making these rotten films? Why don't you do something exciting, like "King Creole"? He said he left all that to the Colonel, but that the Colonel promised something really exciting soon, real soon.

- Jack Good


Right on! Good gave a voice to what millions of fans were thinking: "why have you abandoned ship, Elvis?"

The song where Elvis joined Lance LeGault's band and rocked the house was Jimmy Reed's "Baby What You Want Me To Do," which Presley almost recorded in Nashville that August, and performed live for the NBC-TV cameras in June 1968 in stunning fashion.

Better late than never!


G I Blues was only "bad" if you view Elvis purely as a rock n roll performer who should have been made only Dean/Brando-esque films. The film is hardly a masterpiece, but it is a good solid effort and considerably better than the leaden Love Me Tender (and, arguably, Loving You - which is teen-moving-making-by-numbers if you take away Presley himself). And certainly better than Wild in the Country.

On another note, I have never been convinced about Elvis being distraught by the quality of the songs. They might not have been prime rock n roll material. but then Elvis was no longer just a rock n roll performer - he recorded a Peggy Lee cover for Elvis is Back for goodness sakes. And he might have been naïve, but he wasn't stupid - Wooden Heart and Big Boots might not have been his choice of material, but he knew that they were essentially plot songs and had to be that way. If Elvis was so upset by the material, why did he basically throwaway Blue Suede Shoes as if he didn't give a damn? How does that fit into the "Elvis was upset by the material" argument? It doesn't, because those comments that Elvis is supposed to have made are all heresay. He was, for sure, frustrated by the recording setup for the first sessions, but that's hardly the same thing.

In the four hours of G I Blues outtakes do we hear him say at any point that he dislikes a song? That's a genuine question, I haven't heard all of them.

Re: Why did Presley allow this?! Jack Good speaks out, 1960

Tue Nov 05, 2013 3:02 am

The movie started the unfortunate template of low budget musicals Elvis would find himself stuck in. Instead of going on location in Germany for some of the movie, The movie would be shot entirely on sound stages except for the remote outdoor scenes that were filmed with and Elvis stand in. The same thing happened with "Fun In Acapulco".

Re: Why did Presley allow this?! Jack Good speaks out, 1960

Tue Nov 05, 2013 3:04 am

zolderopruiming1 wrote:After G.I. blues Elvis did Flaming star and Wild in the country, two more or less serious acting role movies. But they were not the box-office success G.I. blues was or Blue Hawaii would be.
Y'all had your chance to make Elvis a serious actor but you blew it, so stop whining about the travelogues.....


Because they were lousy movies.

Re: Why did Presley allow this?! Jack Good speaks out, 1960

Tue Nov 05, 2013 3:17 am

eligain wrote:
zolderopruiming1 wrote:After G.I. blues Elvis did Flaming star and Wild in the country, two more or less serious acting role movies. But they were not the box-office success G.I. blues was or Blue Hawaii would be.
Y'all had your chance to make Elvis a serious actor but you blew it, so stop whining about the travelogues.....


Because they were lousy movies.


Anyone who view Flaming Star as a lousy movie has a very strange view of what a lousy movie. While I don't view it as the masterpiece that many do, it is a damn fine western.

Re: Why did Presley allow this?! Jack Good speaks out, 1960

Tue Nov 05, 2013 3:20 am

Here's the original trade review for exhibitors in Boxoffice:
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Re: Why did Presley allow this?! Jack Good speaks out, 1960

Tue Nov 05, 2013 5:22 am

mysterytrainrideson wrote:Thanks Tony and The Doc for the info, interesting read. At least someone, at the time, saw it for what it was...

Even today, i still can not understand why Elvis let Hollywood and The Colonel destroy his career like they did.


You are welcome. Jack Good certainly wasn't a typical scribe, producer or actor.

At the time, it seems Elvis was OK to do "G.I. Blues" because better things were promised ... or implied.

Re: Why did Presley allow this?! Jack Good speaks out, 1960

Tue Nov 05, 2013 5:30 am

poormadpeter wrote:If Mr Good really thought Elvis could continue in Hollywood forever playing a teenager with an attitude then he was very much mistaken.

Where does the reviewer suggest this? Seems clear the reviewer is referring to the white washing Elvis was given with G.I. Blues and the resulting lesser performance given by Elvis.

It's interesting to read a vintage review that pinpoints so well an issue that would plague Elvis for much of the next decade. Elvis was better than the mediocre position G.I. Blues left him in. Thank goodness he was still cutting great music at this time. Why oh why did he not hit the road with a tremendous comeback tour. Oh well.

Re: Why did Presley allow this?! Jack Good speaks out, 1960

Tue Nov 05, 2013 5:39 am

The whole intention of 1960 was to reinvent Elvis Presley and make him not just accepted by middle America but have his records bought by them. It was one of the Colonel's brilliantly executed plans from the rock n roll-lite of Stuck on You to the reworking of a neopolitan song as singles, from the pairing of Elvis with Sinatra and the placing of him in traditional musicals and westerns on screen, from the release of an album that never rocked as hard as his 50s records to the release of an album of gospel material. It was brilliantly planned and brilliantly executed. Much of the problem with that plan musically was that Elvis continually needed challenges to get him working to the best of his ability, and none would be presented to him and none would be sought by him for another six years when the How Great Thou Art sessions occured.

Re: Why did Presley allow this?! Jack Good speaks out, 1960

Tue Nov 05, 2013 6:06 am

poormadpeter wrote:
drjohncarpenter wrote:
Tony.. wrote:Interesting and controversial article from 1960.
Image


It's not controversial, rather it's an example of someone seeing the reality of how bad "G.I. Blues" really was, and caring enough (or having the balls) to write about it publicly. It would be great to read the rest of the piece, and one may see it's continued on page 4.

Do you have page 4?

Also, you do not identify the date or source of the article, but it must be from Disc magazine, perhaps the 11-26-1960 issue, where Jack Good anchored a weekly column for several years. We can see a bit of Elvis in his army hat underneath the article, too.

May we see that as well?

Jack Good was a pioneering UK and US TV producer, as well as a record producer, musician and actor. Among other things, he helped to create ABC-TV's "Shindig!"



Image

George Harrison, Jack Good (producer), John Lennon - "Shindig" U.K. taping, Saturday, October 3, 1964



Image
Jack Good (producer)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack_Good_(producer)
http://www.rockabilly.nl/references/messages/jack_good.htm



Good was always forthright, not just in that spot-on review of "G.I. Blues."

Case-in-point: it seems none of you are aware that Jack played a small role in "Clambake" as Hathaway, the front desk clerk.

Well, at the April 1967 film after-party, Good spoke to Presley in the same straightforward, almost desperately earnest manner that John Lennon had done two years earlier, when the Beatles visited 565 Perugia Way. The conversation was recalled in Jerry Hopkins' 1971 biography on Elvis:

"Clambake" was one of the really, really awful ones. There was a party after the film was completed, with Lance LeGault's band playing. And Elvis wouldn't sing. Slowly, Lance got him into a blues thing, "Let It Roll" [sic]. And he was terrific. And I thought what a shame he doesn't do that sort of thing in the film. I said to Elvis, "Why do you keep making these rotten films? Why don't you do something exciting, like "King Creole"? He said he left all that to the Colonel, but that the Colonel promised something really exciting soon, real soon.

- Jack Good


Right on! Good gave a voice to what millions of fans were thinking: "why have you abandoned ship, Elvis?"

The song where Elvis joined Lance LeGault's band and rocked the house was Jimmy Reed's "Baby What You Want Me To Do," which Presley almost recorded in Nashville that August, and performed live for the NBC-TV cameras in June 1968 in stunning fashion.

Better late than never!


G I Blues was only "bad" if you view Elvis purely as a rock n roll performer ...


No, it was a poor film by any measure, and certainly a step down from his two previous films, for MGM (1957) and Paramount (1958), which is kind of the point of Jack Good's column in Disc.


poormadpeter wrote:On another note, I have never been convinced about Elvis being distraught by the quality of the songs ... those comments that Elvis is supposed to have made are all heresay.


No, his problems with the soundtrack are fact.

Peter Guralnick's Careless Love offers in clear prose about Elvis' disenchantment with Leiber and Stoller's submissions being excluded for "business" reasons and how, in a phone conversation with Priscilla, the singer says he told Parker that half the songs in the film should be cut. When she asked what management said, Presley replied it was implicit that nothing could be done. "I'm locked in this thing," was his sad lament.

You should buy that biography and give it a read. Or borrow it from your local library. You'll be amazed. ;-)

---

Back on topic, Jack Good's article on "G.I. Blues" is angry because he senses it is part of management's grand scheme to make Elvis inoffensive and thus palatable to a mass audience, and portends the beginning of the end: a formulaic, assembly-line scheme of film musical/soundtrack album symbiosis.

Re: Why did Presley allow this?! Jack Good speaks out, 1960

Tue Nov 05, 2013 6:27 am

And, despite all this, all the bad career moves, the downfall and hindsight he's still around. As if he never died! He's still a name in the media, he is till selling records and DVD's. How many of all those artists that challenged him along the way can display the statistics and facts of Elvis' ongoing popularity? If those movies were so bad as presented here, there must have been something real serious bothering the public that went to see them?
What people tend to forget today, is to put it all in the timeframe it belongs. After all it was and still is, all about TCB! I would assume that no matter how much a teenage Beatles fan adored A Hard Day's Night back then, he would have a slightly different view of it when presenting that one to their own children, today! Elvis was a very polite personality! He stood by the contracts he had signed, and fullfilled them. How on earth did he survive as an artist above all this? 8)
By the way: G I Blues is not my favourite Elvis movie!

Re: Why did Presley allow this?! Jack Good speaks out, 1960

Tue Nov 05, 2013 6:29 am

bajo wrote:And, despite all this, all the bad career moves, the downfall and hindsight he's still around. As if he never died! He's still a name in the media, he is till selling records and DVD's. How many of all those artists that challenged him along the way can display the statistics and facts of Elvis' ongoing popularity? If those movies were so bad as presented here, there must have been something real serious bothering the public that went to see them?
What people tend to forget today, is to put it all in the timeframe it belongs. After all it was and still is, all about TCB! I would assume that no matter how much a teenage Beatles fan adored A Hard Day's Night back then, he would have a slightly different view of it when presenting that one to their own children, today! Elvis was a very polite personality! He stood by the contracts he had signed, and fullfilled them. How on earth did he survive as an artist above all this? 8)
By the way: G I Blues is not my favourite Elvis movie!


Have you ever watched "A Hard Day's Night"?

Re: Why did Presley allow this?! Jack Good speaks out, 1960

Tue Nov 05, 2013 6:30 am

poormadpeter wrote:
eligain wrote:
zolderopruiming1 wrote:After G.I. blues Elvis did Flaming star and Wild in the country, two more or less serious acting role movies. But they were not the box-office success G.I. blues was or Blue Hawaii would be.
Y'all had your chance to make Elvis a serious actor but you blew it, so stop whining about the travelogues.....


Because they were lousy movies.


Anyone who view Flaming Star as a lousy movie has a very strange view of what a lousy movie. While I don't view it as the masterpiece that many do, it is a damn fine western.


Flaming Star failed to ignite the public's attention and compared to other top westerns of the time, it is rather mediocre. I personally have always found it hard to sit through and I like westerns. I do like Elvis's look in this movie and I think he does a solid performance. It was a good Elvis western but not a great western. It could have been that the public just wasn't ready to see Elvis in a mostly non singing role. Unfortunately the successes of GI Blues and Blue Hawaii showed that more money could be made with low budget musicals vs high budget dramas.
Last edited by eligain on Tue Nov 05, 2013 6:40 am, edited 1 time in total.