Off Topic Messages

Re: Ten favourite Horror Films

Tue Oct 29, 2013 10:00 pm

keninlincs wrote:
drjohncarpenter wrote:
jak wrote:I think Fredric March gave one of the most amazing performances I have ever seen in Jekyll.He was incredible and that will always be my favorite adaptation of the film.
I cant believe I have never heard of the Indestructible Man.I will seek that one out ASAP.


Grab your popcorn, pull up a chair, here 'tis:



phpBB [video]

"Indestructible Man" (Allied Artists, March 1956)
Directed by: Jack Pollexfen


Image

Thanks for reminding me about this,rewatched last night


You are quite welcome. So glad you enjoyed it!

Re: Ten favourite Horror Films

Tue Oct 29, 2013 10:08 pm

We know that Elvis loved Vincent Price very, very much. I am sure that HOUSE OF WAX was one of Elvis' favorites, especially around Halloween.

If you want to know more about this landmark 3-D production - and the brilliant restored edition on 3-D Blu-ray - check out this article: http://www.3dfilmarchive.com/House-of-Wax

Re: Ten favourite Horror Films

Tue Oct 29, 2013 11:01 pm

HoneyTalkNelson wrote:We know that Elvis loved Vincent Price very, very much. I am sure that HOUSE OF WAX was one of Elvis' favorites, especially around Halloween.

If you want to know more about this landmark 3-D production - and the brilliant restored edition on 3-D Blu-ray - check out this article: http://www.3dfilmarchive.com/House-of-Wax


Yes! Fantastic film, and one of my top ten:

drjohncarpenter wrote:Top Ten (chronological)

Frankenstein (1931)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frankenstein_(1931_film)

Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1931)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dr._Jekyll_and_Mr._Hyde_(1931_film)

Bride of Frankenstein (1935)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bride_of_Frankenstein

The Wolf Man (1941)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Wolf_Man_(1941_film)

Frankenstein Meets The Wolf Man (1943)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frankenstein_Meets_the_Wolf_Man

Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein (1948)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abbott_and_Costello_Meet_Frankenstein

House of Wax (1953)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_of_Wax_(1953_film)


Indestructible Man (1956)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indestructible_Man

Carnival of Souls (1962)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carnival_of_Souls

Night of the Living Dead (1968)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Night_of_the_Living_Dead


Runner-Ups (chronological)

Psycho (1960)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psycho_(1960_film)

Magic (1978)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magic_(1978_film)

Alien (1979)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alien_(film)

Christine (1983)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christine_(1983_film)

The Lost Boys (1987)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Lost_Boys


But ... did he screen it at the Memphian in the '70s?

Re: Ten favourite Horror Films

Tue Oct 29, 2013 11:23 pm

Sadly, the Memphian no longer had the required silver screen in the 1970's so they could not run it in 3-D. :(

We all know that Elvis loved 3-D very, very much! :wink:

Re: Ten favourite Horror Films

Tue Oct 29, 2013 11:46 pm

HoneyTalkNelson wrote:Sadly, the Memphian no longer had the required silver screen in the 1970's so they could not run it in 3-D. :(

We all know that Elvis loved 3-D very, very much! :wink:


Especially this one!


740316_Andy Warhols Frankenstein 3D.JPG

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andy_Warhol's_Frankenstein
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Re: Ten favourite Horror Films

Wed Oct 30, 2013 5:22 am

drjohncarpenter wrote:
HoneyTalkNelson wrote:Sadly, the Memphian no longer had the required silver screen in the 1970's so they could not run it in 3-D. :(

We all know that Elvis loved 3-D very, very much! :wink:


Especially this one!


740316_Andy Warhols Frankenstein 3D.JPG

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andy_Warhol's_Frankenstein


Where did he see it?

Re: Ten favourite Horror Films

Wed Oct 30, 2013 12:11 pm

rjm wrote:Anyone remember this one? It was psychological, and I was able to sit through it a few times. In the morning!

Image

rjm

Sent From My Phabulous Galaxy Note II Phablet Using Tapatalk 4

Tracked down a copy of this on your recommendation,will watched it tonight if it comes in the post today

Re: Ten favourite Horror Films

Wed Oct 30, 2013 8:10 pm

poormadpeter wrote:
drjohncarpenter wrote:
HoneyTalkNelson wrote:Sadly, the Memphian no longer had the required silver screen in the 1970's so they could not run it in 3-D. :(

We all know that Elvis loved 3-D very, very much! :wink:


Especially this one!


Image

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andy_Warhol's_Frankenstein


Where did he see it?


We can't be sure, but most likely ... a movie theater. ;-)

Re: Ten favourite Horror Films

Wed Oct 30, 2013 8:22 pm

drjohncarpenter wrote:
poormadpeter wrote:
drjohncarpenter wrote:
HoneyTalkNelson wrote:Sadly, the Memphian no longer had the required silver screen in the 1970's so they could not run it in 3-D. :(

We all know that Elvis loved 3-D very, very much! :wink:


Especially this one!


Image

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andy_Warhol's_Frankenstein


Where did he see it?


We can't be sure, but most likely ... a movie theater. ;-)


Well, I'm curious since we've already been told that the movie theatre in Memphis wasn't able to show 3D in the 1970s.... Bearing that in mind, it would be interesting to know how you know he saw it in the first place.

Re: Ten favourite Horror Films

Wed Oct 30, 2013 10:10 pm

I've no idea whether Elvis saw Flesh for Frankenstein, or not, but in the spirit of this thread, I would have to cite this as one of the better examples of 3D from the era. The use of depth in juxtaposition to objects and innards jumping out at the viewer was very creative and extremely well done, although, the lusty delivery of some truly eccentric dialogue also warrants mentioning any time this film is discussed.

Re: Ten favourite Horror Films

Wed Oct 30, 2013 10:22 pm

greystoke wrote:I've no idea whether Elvis saw Flesh for Frankenstein, or not, but in the spirit of this thread, I would have to cite this as one of the better examples of 3D from the era. The use of depth in juxtaposition to objects and innards jumping out at the viewer was very creative and extremely well done, although, the lusty delivery of some truly eccentric dialogue also warrants mentioning any time this film is discussed.


It's interesting this film has cropped up here, as I'm running a course at uni at the moment on non-Hollywood cinema, and the last couple of weeks have brought up discussions on what is and isn't arthouse, mainstream, exploitation cinema etc and how they can and do crossover, and the Morrissey/Warhol films from the 60s and 70s have cropped up a great deal in relation to that. I haven't seen them for many years, but they are bonkers with moments of genius.

Re: Ten favourite Horror Films

Wed Oct 30, 2013 11:07 pm

greystoke wrote:I've no idea whether Elvis saw Flesh for Frankenstein, or not, but in the spirit of this thread, I would have to cite this as one of the better examples of 3D from the era. The use of depth in juxtaposition to objects and innards jumping out at the viewer was very creative and extremely well done, although, the lusty delivery of some truly eccentric dialogue also warrants mentioning any time this film is discussed.


Indeed!

Re: Ten favourite Horror Films

Thu Oct 31, 2013 1:02 am

It is worth saying here that, in the UK, Film 4 are showing perhaps the weirdest "horror" double bill ever for Halloween: lars Von Trier's Antichrist followed by the silent mayhem that is Haxen. Now, I've got to the stage where I think von Trier IS the antichrist - I've seen the film once and that was more than enough, thanks. I thought it was pretentious headline-making twaddle.

Haxen, on the other hand, is a silent film from 1924 and very rarely gets shown on British TV - if it ever has before. It's a kind of dramatized documentary about witchcraft through the ages. The restored print look gorgeous, but doesn't hide the fact that the film is completely bonkers. I'm sure it was meant to be taken seriously, and the lecture-style opening section is a bit of a bore, but after that you get a cavalcade of madness from the kissing of the devil's naked backside to mad dancing nuns. I'm being a bit frivolous with my description as this is a well-respected film and actually has quite a lot of serious things to say...but taken at face value without the dissections of the deeper meanings, it is a hoot and a film really quite unlike any other that you're unlikely to ever see shown on British TV again!

Re: Ten favourite Horror Films

Thu Oct 31, 2013 4:46 pm

poormadpeter wrote:It is worth saying here that, in the UK, Film 4 are showing perhaps the weirdest "horror" double bill ever for Halloween: lars Von Trier's Antichrist followed by the silent mayhem that is Haxen. Now, I've got to the stage where I think von Trier IS the antichrist - I've seen the film once and that was more than enough, thanks. I thought it was pretentious headline-making twaddle.

Haxen, on the other hand, is a silent film from 1924 and very rarely gets shown on British TV - if it ever has before. It's a kind of dramatized documentary about witchcraft through the ages. The restored print look gorgeous, but doesn't hide the fact that the film is completely bonkers. I'm sure it was meant to be taken seriously, and the lecture-style opening section is a bit of a bore, but after that you get a cavalcade of madness from the kissing of the devil's naked backside to mad dancing nuns. I'm being a bit frivolous with my description as this is a well-respected film and actually has quite a lot of serious things to say...but taken at face value without the dissections of the deeper meanings, it is a hoot and a film really quite unlike any other that you're unlikely to ever see shown on British TV again!

lol... these are "Haxen" in Germany: :P
haxe.jpg
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Re: Ten favourite Horror Films

Fri Nov 01, 2013 10:51 am

Watched "The Other" last night decent little movie.Thanks for the tip

Re: Ten favourite Horror Films

Fri Nov 01, 2013 11:09 am

keninlincs wrote:Watched "The Other" last night decent little movie.Thanks for the tip


You're welcome; it scared the blazes out of me! I saw it around two decades ago, and watched it more than once. (VHS).

Tonight, I watched the very first Twilight Zone episode. It was a nice beginning, tho the series got way scarier! ;)

rjm
P.S. -- And "Catspaw," the classic Trek or Treat episode, of course!

Sent From My Phabulous Galaxy Note II Phablet Using Tapatalk 4

Re: Ten favourite Horror Films

Fri Nov 01, 2013 11:17 am

Catspaw was a great episode
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Re: Ten favourite Horror Films

Fri Nov 01, 2013 4:28 pm

keninlincs wrote:Catspaw was a great episode

I think it wasn't the best and the ending was, for today's standards, ridiculous. Nevertheless I enjoyed it! :D

I still have a trauma from the "The Lights Of Zetar" episode, when I watched it about thirty years ago. :wink:

Re: Ten favourite Horror Films

Fri Nov 01, 2013 5:37 pm

luckyjackson1 wrote:
keninlincs wrote:Catspaw was a great episode

I think it wasn't the best and the ending was, for today's standards, ridiculous. Nevertheless I enjoyed it! :D

I still have a trauma from the "The Lights Of Zetar" episode, when I watched it about thirty years ago. :wink:

Thats 60s tv for you

Re: Ten favourite Horror Films

Fri Nov 01, 2013 7:05 pm

luckyjackson1 wrote:
poormadpeter wrote:It is worth saying here that, in the UK, Film 4 are showing perhaps the weirdest "horror" double bill ever for Halloween: lars Von Trier's Antichrist followed by the silent mayhem that is Haxen. Now, I've got to the stage where I think von Trier IS the antichrist - I've seen the film once and that was more than enough, thanks. I thought it was pretentious headline-making twaddle.

Haxen, on the other hand, is a silent film from 1924 and very rarely gets shown on British TV - if it ever has before. It's a kind of dramatized documentary about witchcraft through the ages. The restored print look gorgeous, but doesn't hide the fact that the film is completely bonkers. I'm sure it was meant to be taken seriously, and the lecture-style opening section is a bit of a bore, but after that you get a cavalcade of madness from the kissing of the devil's naked backside to mad dancing nuns. I'm being a bit frivolous with my description as this is a well-respected film and actually has quite a lot of serious things to say...but taken at face value without the dissections of the deeper meanings, it is a hoot and a film really quite unlike any other that you're unlikely to ever see shown on British TV again!

lol... these are "Haxen" in Germany: :P
haxe.jpg


Haxan is a fascinating film, and for its time, was bold, vivid and brilliantly imagined with some incredible effects sequences. It's bonkers, as you've said, but not insubstantial. And, despite an unusual narrative approach, holds a strong allure that belies its running time. It's screening near me on Sunday night, stemming from the B.F.I.'s Gothic season, no doubt. Antichrist is another fascinating film, and a quite brilliant one, in my opinion. Conversely, I'm more than partial to the cinema of Lars von Trier and would cite this as one of his best works. By the time of this film's release, von Trier had taken considerable steps outside the realms, and rules, of Dogme '95 -- and again, more-so, with the stunning, if flawed, Melancholia. Antichrist plays almost like a nightmarish character study, with Willem Dafoe and Charlotte Gainsboroug proving more than able with such challenging and nakedly ambitious material. The story, for those who don't know of this film, is about a couple who retreat to the solace of a cabin in the woods after their infant son's death. This return to Eden comes at the cost of the wife's sanity, who cannot cope with their loss and views the world around her, and her actions within, as being evil. This turns into a treatise on misogyny via tropes of the horror genre and some coarse satire on relationships. Von Trier directs assuredly here, allowing his actors space to exercise a great deal of improvisation, whilst ratcheting up the tension and holding little back for the imagination as scenes of sex and violence are played out absolutely. A debt is owed to the likes of Sam Raimi and the torture porn cycle, but von Trier brings more substance than any example of the latter, whilst matching the gruesome nature of such in an unflinching manner. One of the real heroes of Antichrist, however, is Anthony Dod Mantle, who was also the D.O.P. on Slumdog Millionaire and, more recently, the excellent story of James Hunt and Niki Lauda's rivalry, Rush. His cinematography is stunning here, both the wide open landscapes and wooded areas, and the dark claustrophobia of the cabin and its surrounding areas as moods change, panic and fear take hold and day turns to night.

Re: Ten favourite Horror Films

Fri Nov 01, 2013 9:50 pm

greystoke wrote:
luckyjackson1 wrote:
poormadpeter wrote:It is worth saying here that, in the UK, Film 4 are showing perhaps the weirdest "horror" double bill ever for Halloween: lars Von Trier's Antichrist followed by the silent mayhem that is Haxen. Now, I've got to the stage where I think von Trier IS the antichrist - I've seen the film once and that was more than enough, thanks. I thought it was pretentious headline-making twaddle.

Haxen, on the other hand, is a silent film from 1924 and very rarely gets shown on British TV - if it ever has before. It's a kind of dramatized documentary about witchcraft through the ages. The restored print look gorgeous, but doesn't hide the fact that the film is completely bonkers. I'm sure it was meant to be taken seriously, and the lecture-style opening section is a bit of a bore, but after that you get a cavalcade of madness from the kissing of the devil's naked backside to mad dancing nuns. I'm being a bit frivolous with my description as this is a well-respected film and actually has quite a lot of serious things to say...but taken at face value without the dissections of the deeper meanings, it is a hoot and a film really quite unlike any other that you're unlikely to ever see shown on British TV again!

lol... these are "Haxen" in Germany: :P
haxe.jpg


Haxan is a fascinating film, and for its time, was bold, vivid and brilliantly imagined with some incredible effects sequences. It's bonkers, as you've said, but not insubstantial. And, despite an unusual narrative approach, holds a strong allure that belies its running time. It's screening near me on Sunday night, stemming from the B.F.I.'s Gothic season, no doubt. Antichrist is another fascinating film, and a quite brilliant one, in my opinion. Conversely, I'm more than partial to the cinema of Lars von Trier and would cite this as one of his best works. By the time of this film's release, von Trier had taken considerable steps outside the realms, and rules, of Dogme '95 -- and again, more-so, with the stunning, if flawed, Melancholia. Antichrist plays almost like a nightmarish character study, with Willem Dafoe and Charlotte Gainsboroug proving more than able with such challenging and nakedly ambitious material. The story, for those who don't know of this film, is about a couple who retreat to the solace of a cabin in the woods after their infant son's death. This return to Eden comes at the cost of the wife's sanity, who cannot cope with their loss and views the world around her, and her actions within, as being evil. This turns into a treatise on misogyny via tropes of the horror genre and some coarse satire on relationships. Von Trier directs assuredly here, allowing his actors space to exercise a great deal of improvisation, whilst ratcheting up the tension and holding little back for the imagination as scenes of sex and violence are played out absolutely. A debt is owed to the likes of Sam Raimi and the torture porn cycle, but von Trier brings more substance than any example of the latter, whilst matching the gruesome nature of such in an unflinching manner. One of the real heroes of Antichrist, however, is Anthony Dod Mantle, who was also the D.O.P. on Slumdog Millionaire and, more recently, the excellent story of James Hunt and Niki Lauda's rivalry, Rush. His cinematography is stunning here, both the wide open landscapes and wooded areas, and the dark claustrophobia of the cabin and its surrounding areas as moods change, panic and fear take hold and day turns to night.


I agree that Antichrist looked gorgeous - not least the opening sequence. But I thought it was very much a case of style and shock over substance. Antichrist was the first time when I saw a von Trier film and realised he had somehow passed the point of no return - where he was interested in making headlines more than interested in making great films. He has always, of course, been a self-publicist, even up to the point of his little talking head segments at the end of each episode of The Kingdom, and the rather strange interview from a couple of years back that got him banned from Cannes in 2011.

My understanding is that Melancholia was a return to form(I haven't seen it), but his new film, Nymphomaniac, seems to be another case of Trier making headlines - and the film appears to have been doing just that for the last twelve month ever since it was announced that Jamie Bell, Christian Slater and Shia LeBeouf would be in a film containing real sex. Quite why real sex is more shocking than faked sex I have no idea - but it turns out that body doubles will be used for the real sex bits anyway, which surely defeats the object, but that's another thing altogether.

While Trier used to be counted on for making interesting films, he now can be counted for making controversial films, and I don't see those as one and the same. Whereas a von Trier films was once an event that occurred every three years or so, now they turn up with more regularity than a reboot of a comic book franchise. Sadly, I feel that the controversy and his seeming obsession with his own fame and publicity has eclipsed anything interesting that he may have to say over the last few years. I have no objection to pushing boundaries (although Antichrist and (it seems) Nymphomaniac do that less than he would have us believe) but there has to be a point to it and the director/writer has to have something interesting to say.

Re: Ten favourite Horror Films

Sat Nov 02, 2013 4:59 pm

I think we may have to disagree on Lars von Trier and the merits of Antichrist. Yes, there's huge stylistic flourishes and a clear aim to shock, but I don't believe it's without substance. What von Trier does so well as a director, is hold tight to an idea and carry it through to completion. Antichrist is brimming with ideas and - as I mentioned above - a familiarity that can be read by fans of horror cinema. The mood and tone it creates are paramount, however, with a rich metaphorical undercurrent that's not alien to the genre. And that's, mostly, where Antichrist will succeed or fail. Whether the viewer will invest in a film of this nature, therefore, won't be down to narrative alone, but on the strength of audience conviction, and whether tonal shifts and narrative deviations will unsettle nerves or patience. This is particularly true of the final act, in which scenes of mutilation, brutality and nature gone askew do aim to startle, but also contain underlying themes and a purpose -- even if such is unclear. But this is challenging cinema from a challenging, knee-jerk director, who, in my opinion, was near the top of his game with Antichrist. And what's important to consider in this respect, without providing any spoilers for those wanting to see the film, is that Charlotte Gainsboroug's character believes everything in the world/her world is evil. Even in the "garden of Eden," where she previously found so much happiness.

Re: Ten favourite Horror Films

Fri Nov 08, 2013 10:18 pm

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9rvbD6AecVE

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ypxQqqVfGrg

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9uhlfL3T ... DkoPYkvAIA

:smt006