Re: Billboard 1977 --> Elvis In Concert is #1!

Sun Jan 16, 2011 7:07 am

jbnva58 wrote:
elvispresleyfan1935 wrote:
Frankie Teardrop wrote:
Gregory Nolan Jr. wrote: I recall FLEETWOOD MAC being popular with my sister, but for a those


Always with the knocks on any other artist, no matter how justifiably beloved, who didn't happen to be Elvis Presley. Fleetwood Mac were popular with a hell of a lot of people, from MOR listeners to punks like me, and Rumours deserved all the sales it garnered. It is one of the finest albums ever released.
Elvis's passing was undeniably a deeply tragic passing of an era, it is a shame that EIC was the album that benefited from the attendant publicity, in my opinion. A comprehensive repackage of his classics would have been a better release.


I agree Frankie. Rumour's kicks a$$! Fleetwood Mac had so many good songs, Dreams, Rianna, Go Your Own Way, Gypsy, landslide....


Fleetwood Mac was a GREAT Pop/Rock group,and the "Rumours" LP was a must own for any high school student in '77(which I was!! :D )

It is a must-own album for any rock and roll fan period, regardless of when one went to high school.

Re: Billboard 1977 --> Elvis In Concert is #1!

Sun Jan 16, 2011 7:16 am

midnightx wrote:
jbnva58 wrote:
elvispresleyfan1935 wrote:
Frankie Teardrop wrote:
Gregory Nolan Jr. wrote: I recall FLEETWOOD MAC being popular with my sister, but for a those


Always with the knocks on any other artist, no matter how justifiably beloved, who didn't happen to be Elvis Presley. Fleetwood Mac were popular with a hell of a lot of people, from MOR listeners to punks like me, and Rumours deserved all the sales it garnered. It is one of the finest albums ever released.
Elvis's passing was undeniably a deeply tragic passing of an era, it is a shame that EIC was the album that benefited from the attendant publicity, in my opinion. A comprehensive repackage of his classics would have been a better release.


I agree Frankie. Rumour's kicks a$$! Fleetwood Mac had so many good songs, Dreams, Rianna, Go Your Own Way, Gypsy, landslide....


Fleetwood Mac was a GREAT Pop/Rock group,and the "Rumours" LP was a must own for any high school student in '77(which I was!! :D )

It is a must-own album for any rock and roll fan period, regardless of when one went to high school.


True,no disrespect to them,just the time frame for me :D
Best!

Re: Billboard 1977 --> Elvis In Concert is #1!

Mon Jan 17, 2011 2:49 am

Perhaps Elvis' death really reminded the general public who exactly he was & what they had missed out on focusing on current "flavor of the month" hits.

(Don't get me wrong, there's some real talent here. But the public is fickle always fascinates on the latest craze, resulting in more interest later on concerning the real major artists & their work.)

Very cool to say the least. Thanks Doc.

Re: Billboard 1977 --> Elvis In Concert is #1!

Sat Jul 02, 2011 7:09 pm

midnightx wrote:Great album!


8) It's about frickin' time that you realized it bud!!!!! 8) :smt006 8)

Re: Billboard 1977 --> Elvis In Concert is #1!

Sat Jul 02, 2011 7:14 pm

midnightx wrote:
jbnva58 wrote:
elvispresleyfan1935 wrote:
Frankie Teardrop wrote:
Gregory Nolan Jr. wrote: I recall FLEETWOOD MAC being popular with my sister, but for a those


Always with the knocks on any other artist, no matter how justifiably beloved, who didn't happen to be Elvis Presley. Fleetwood Mac were popular with a hell of a lot of people, from MOR listeners to punks like me, and Rumours deserved all the sales it garnered. It is one of the finest albums ever released.
Elvis's passing was undeniably a deeply tragic passing of an era, it is a shame that EIC was the album that benefited from the attendant publicity, in my opinion. A comprehensive repackage of his classics would have been a better release.


I agree Frankie. Rumour's kicks a$$! Fleetwood Mac had so many good songs, Dreams, Rianna, Go Your Own Way, Gypsy, landslide....


Fleetwood Mac was a GREAT Pop/Rock group,and the "Rumours" LP was a must own for any high school student in '77(which I was!! :D )

It is a must-own album for any rock and roll fan period, regardless of when one went to high school.


8) If Elvis was still alive and touring in 1977,and a stranger with a ticket to Elvis in concert and one to Fleetwood Mac came up to you and me and said hey,I've got one ticket to each of these concerts and you can each have one,man would I ever be thrilled that I was the one going to see Elvis!!!!!!!!!! 8) :smt006 8)

Re: Billboard 1977 --> Elvis In Concert is #1!

Sat Jul 02, 2011 7:20 pm

midnightx wrote:
Burning Love wrote:To me what was on of the most impressive things about 77 is the wide variety of material the Elvis recorded in his shows. Granted it really was not anything that he did no do live since his comeback, but if you pair Elvis in Concert with FTD's Spring Tours and Unchained Melody he brought a lot of material to his 77 concerts. In fact I think it may rank among the first with the most varied amont of songs that he did since 69. I am just talking about songs that have live songs that have been released in the each individual year from 69 to 77 on RCA now Sony and FTD. Upon quick check between those 3 CD I think there might be around 38 differernt songs give or take a couple. For someone that was suppose to be in decline and there was some problems he did have a lot of variety,

Burning Love

His band was a well-oiled machine. They were able to dig into the catalogue and handle the material. If only Elvis had put more effort into his craft because the amount of songs played doesn't represent the quality of the concerts from the period.


8) That's a bunch of poppycock!!!!! 8) :smt006 8)

Re: Billboard 1977 --> Elvis In Concert is #1!

Sat Jul 02, 2011 9:32 pm

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Re: Billboard 1977 --> Elvis In Concert is #1!

Sat Jul 02, 2011 9:58 pm

Hi,I live in Ireland and I remember going to purchase the album just before Christmas 1977 and it was more than twice the normal price of an normal Elvis album , I was 13 years old I had not got the money for it as I had saved up my pocket money , I ended purchasing A Legendary Performer Volume 2.
I don' know was it RCA or the record shop jumping on the bandwagon and pumping up the price of the latest Elvis album but I remember the price was mad for it.
My mam and dad bought it for me for Christmas as a surprise
And I have always thought it was a great album with great artwork .

Re: Billboard 1977 --> Elvis In Concert is #1!

Sat Jul 02, 2011 10:55 pm

All I know is that the record stores were jammed after his death! The records were being pressed so fast, there were mistakes. I opened "That's The Way It Is" and a different record was in there!

Other companies helped out with the volume cause it drew people into the stores. And it really DID.

I filled out my LP collection, dumping the crappy 8Track tapes.

But how could they seriously distinguish "country"? Without an electronic system, I think geography played a role. More southern sales for Elvis . . . and the like. But it was not accurate at all..

Who REALLY cares deeply, one way or the other, about Rumors, today? How many still listen to "Don't Stop Thinkin About Tommorrow"? Not even the Clintons, I'd wager. It is not that kind of music.

But gosh, folks, let's not compare death reactions! Not only is it kinda icky, but I was really devasted by MJ's death. It IS possible to be a fan of both. Sheesh. I aleady had all his albums {3 diff formats of Dangerous!} and collections and so bought NONE. Until the interesting grab-bag with the first version of "Behind The Mask" came out.
{Odd that I did get EIC posthumously in 77 but refused to get This Is It; it felt like the soundtrack to a "snuff" film. EIC was, after all, a new Elvis album. Maybe I was naive in 77. I was only a kid then. Would it have been released had he lived? I didn't think of that back then.}

I wasn't trying to pad Elvis's record sales. The records were just so AVAILABLE. LPs. And I wanted 'em.

And I had no interest in countrr music at the time!

rjm
P.S. No. I do NOT own the doll Eddie Murphy played with on SNL. Nor the stuffed toy "Pets." There are limits. I do admit that I have two ELVIS figures. NOT BARBIE!

There will NEVER BE a Mick Fleetwood doll. Guaranteed.

Re: Billboard 1977 --> Elvis In Concert is #1!

Sat Jul 02, 2011 11:15 pm

I'd wager more people care about Rumors today than EIC.

Re: Billboard 1977 --> Elvis In Concert is #1!

Sun Jul 03, 2011 5:58 am

That's because one is easily available, and fortunately, EIC is generally NOT.

Oh, there would be plenty to "care" but not the way some fans imagine.
Because the "caring" would not be postive. An understatement.

rjm

Re: Billboard 1977 --> Elvis In Concert is #1!

Mon Jul 04, 2011 12:52 pm

Rumours has stood the test of time so far. "Dreams" is one of the best singles of the 1970s with sublime singing by Stevie Nicks. For the entirety of the LP the rhythm section cleans house. It's chock full of classic songs. It's really one of the key LPs in the way albums would be marketed in the 1980s and beyond in that several titles were deemed good enough for promotion and they were all released as singles making the LP for late comers (people who bought it six months in or so) almost a greatest hits collection.not only of Fleetwood Mac but of 1977.

Back on topic, the week after this chart in Billboard Elvis had four LPs in the Pop Top 100. Elvis in Concert #3, Moody Blue #33, Elvis' Golden Records, #95 and Elvis:A Legendary Performer#98. The latter two were among five LPs that hit the Billboard Pop Charts again in the weeks and months after Elvis' death. Golden Records Vol. 1 peaked at #63. Golden Records Volume Three peaked at #64. Elvis: A Legendary Performer Vol.1 peaked at #62. Welcome to My World peaked at #71. Worldwide Gold Award Hits peaked at #83. The Cashbox chart featured recharts of Elvis' Golden Records #86, Legendary Performer Vol. 1 #173, Golden Records Vol. 3 #168, Aloha From Hawaii #151, Pure Gold #164, How Great Thou Art #156, Elvis as Recorded at Madison Square Garden #167. And at Christmas the Pickwick Christmas Album at #173.

There are several important things to remember when gauging these chart positions. The first is that with the exception of Welcome to My World which only came out that spring, all of these were catalog albums. That means there weren't a lot of them available in stores. An average retailer might have two or three in stock tops. None of them hit the Billboard Chart until the tenth of September which was a couple weeks after Elvis' death. Some of these titles initially could have sold every single unit out there and still not made a dent in the charts. The numbers that you see here are probably a reflection of store owners ordering more. Even when they order more though they are not going to order as many as they would of the new titles. This is why Moody Blue and Elvis in Concert did so much proportionally better and probably why the LPs finished just under mid-way in the Top 100 and on country charts. The most readily available and highly promoted LPs made the biggest numbers. As a previous poster pointed out the Country chart probably relied heavily on sales of Southern retailers, this is probably why a more eclectic selections of LPs are there. Something like From Elvis Presley Boulevard a #1 C/W LP from the year before, would have probably had significantly placement still in a lot of southern retailer and maybe little to none above the Mason-Dixon line. Additionally, for an LP like 1964's Roustabout which was still in print but not of one of Elvis' best known titles, there may have been only been several hundred copies available at retail nationwide. So every single unit could have moved and not even dented the charts. Additionally, Billboard's charts relied on dollar generated sales at the time which knocked many Elvis LPs out of contention as they were either in RCA's Best Buy series or the Pickwick Camden LPs. I speak from experience in that the Camden LPs were amongst the most widely available Elvis LPs at retail well into the mid-1980s. I remember my friend brought him Let's Be Friends the day after Elvis died. He wanted any Elvis record and the Pickwick was what was left. Another important factor is that Billboard's system of reporting chart sales was at the time disorganized to say the least. Numbers across the catalog probably came in scattered at best. By the way, all the Billboard LPs wound up staying on the charts for several months. It wasn't just one week and done.

Even though RCA/BMG/Sony has never released the full numbers and maybe they don't even know themselves, we can make a reasonable hypothesis that the furor over Elvis' record sales post his passing was not hype. RCA's profits were up 39 percent and sales increased ten percent from 1976 to 1977 without any major technical innovation. Then of course, there is the tremendous anecdotal evidence to which I can also testify. Then there's the sheer volume LPs that hit a national chart. Beyond that though there are the RIAA certifications.

For instance the 1976 budget Frankie and Johnny reissue is certified at a million sales. As an LP of mostly obscure Elvis music, (Even in its initial run F&J was only so much of a hit.) it's quite reasonable to think that many of them came in this period as did probably many of the sales for Double Dynamite, The Wonderful of Christmas which received a platinum certification later that year, the 1976 reissue of His Hand in Mine which at the time earned a Gold award, Pure Gold etc. It's also not going to far to surmise that many of the sales across the Camden/Pickwick catalog came during this time. Much of the difference in the sales that Ernst lists as in the initial run and their final certifications could have easily taken place during this time especially since Pickwick just re-released them the year before and they all had wide store placement. You could say the same for catalog albums like Elvis Now which only moved around 300,000 in its initial run and was out of print after the mid-1980s and wound up being certified Gold. Then you have the million plus sales of each of the Two new LPs, and the two mid-to late 1977 singles.

The impact of Elvis' post death sales was cumulative. Save for the new LPs there wasn't going to be a demand for any one LP as Elvis had more than 60 LPs available at retail at that time (including the budget collections. What happened was that the titles that were in stock sold and so did the ones retailers ordered in after the demand was established and the certifications show us the numbers were big. However, chart wise during the period you weren't necessarily going to see it as not all retailers were going to order in the same title. If they ordered in Fleetwood Mac they would order in Rumors and Fleetwood Mac (the latter in lesser quantities). With Elvis you had a half a dozen choices on greatest hits collections alone. While all retailers probably had some sort of Elvis greatest hits not all were going to have Pure Gold, and A Legendary Performer. That's why you see the lower numbers for those LPs.And the same for the rest of the catalog. Some were going to have titles like Roustabout,[/i [i]Elvis 1956 and Elvis for Everyone while others might have Elvis Now, and Elvis Presley as their non-greatest hits, non live titles.

Re: Billboard 1977 --> Elvis In Concert is #1!

Mon Jul 04, 2011 9:59 pm

likethebike wrote:Rumours has stood the test of time so far. "Dreams" is one of the best singles of the 1970s with sublime singing by Stevie Nicks. For the entirety of the LP the rhythm section cleans house. It's chock full of classic songs. It's really one of the key LPs in the way albums would be marketed in the 1980s and beyond in that several titles were deemed good enough for promotion and they were all released as singles making the LP for late comers (people who bought it six months in or so) almost a greatest hits collection.not only of Fleetwood Mac but of 1977.

Back on topic, the week after this chart in Billboard Elvis had four LPs in the Pop Top 100. Elvis in Concert #3, Moody Blue #33, Elvis' Golden Records, #95 and Elvis:A Legendary Performer#98. The latter two were among five LPs that hit the Billboard Pop Charts again in the weeks and months after Elvis' death. Golden Records Vol. 1 peaked at #63. Golden Records Volume Three peaked at #64. Elvis: A Legendary Performer Vol.1 peaked at #62. Welcome to My World peaked at #71. Worldwide Gold Award Hits peaked at #83. The Cashbox chart featured recharts of Elvis' Golden Records #86, Legendary Performer Vol. 1 #173, Golden Records Vol. 3 #168, Aloha From Hawaii #151, Pure Gold #164, How Great Thou Art #156, Elvis as Recorded at Madison Square Garden #167. And at Christmas the Pickwick Christmas Album at #173.

There are several important things to remember when gauging these chart positions. The first is that with the exception of Welcome to My World which only came out that spring, all of these were catalog albums. That means there weren't a lot of them available in stores. An average retailer might have two or three in stock tops. None of them hit the Billboard Chart until the tenth of September which was a couple weeks after Elvis' death. Some of these titles initially could have sold every single unit out there and still not made a dent in the charts. The numbers that you see here are probably a reflection of store owners ordering more. Even when they order more though they are not going to order as many as they would of the new titles. This is why Moody Blue and Elvis in Concert did so much proportionally better and probably why the LPs finished just under mid-way in the Top 100 and on country charts. The most readily available and highly promoted LPs made the biggest numbers. As a previous poster pointed out the Country chart probably relied heavily on sales of Southern retailers, this is probably why a more eclectic selections of LPs are there. Something like From Elvis Presley Boulevard a #1 C/W LP from the year before, would have probably had significantly placement still in a lot of southern retailer and maybe little to none above the Mason-Dixon line. Additionally, for an LP like 1964's Roustabout which was still in print but not of one of Elvis' best known titles, there may have been only been several hundred copies available at retail nationwide. So every single unit could have moved and not even dented the charts. Additionally, Billboard's charts relied on dollar generated sales at the time which knocked many Elvis LPs out of contention as they were either in RCA's Best Buy series or the Pickwick Camden LPs. I speak from experience in that the Camden LPs were amongst the most widely available Elvis LPs at retail well into the mid-1980s. I remember my friend brought him Let's Be Friends the day after Elvis died. He wanted any Elvis record and the Pickwick was what was left. Another important factor is that Billboard's system of reporting chart sales was at the time disorganized to say the least. Numbers across the catalog probably came in scattered at best. By the way, all the Billboard LPs wound up staying on the charts for several months. It wasn't just one week and done.

Even though RCA/BMG/Sony has never released the full numbers and maybe they don't even know themselves, we can make a reasonable hypothesis that the furor over Elvis' record sales post his passing was not hype. RCA's profits were up 39 percent and sales increased ten percent from 1976 to 1977 without any major technical innovation. Then of course, there is the tremendous anecdotal evidence to which I can also testify. Then there's the sheer volume LPs that hit a national chart. Beyond that though there are the RIAA certifications.

For instance the 1976 budget Frankie and Johnny reissue is certified at a million sales. As an LP of mostly obscure Elvis music, (Even in its initial run F&J was only so much of a hit.) it's quite reasonable to think that many of them came in this period as did probably many of the sales for Double Dynamite, The Wonderful of Christmas which received a platinum certification later that year, the 1976 reissue of His Hand in Mine which at the time earned a Gold award, Pure Gold etc. It's also not going to far to surmise that many of the sales across the Camden/Pickwick catalog came during this time. Much of the difference in the sales that Ernst lists as in the initial run and their final certifications could have easily taken place during this time especially since Pickwick just re-released them the year before and they all had wide store placement. You could say the same for catalog albums like Elvis Now which only moved around 300,000 in its initial run and was out of print after the mid-1980s and wound up being certified Gold. Then you have the million plus sales of each of the Two new LPs, and the two mid-to late 1977 singles.

The impact of Elvis' post death sales was cumulative. Save for the new LPs there wasn't going to be a demand for any one LP as Elvis had more than 60 LPs available at retail at that time (including the budget collections. What happened was that the titles that were in stock sold and so did the ones retailers ordered in after the demand was established and the certifications show us the numbers were big. However, chart wise during the period you weren't necessarily going to see it as not all retailers were going to order in the same title. If they ordered in Fleetwood Mac they would order in Rumors and Fleetwood Mac (the latter in lesser quantities). With Elvis you had a half a dozen choices on greatest hits collections alone. While all retailers probably had some sort of Elvis greatest hits not all were going to have Pure Gold, and A Legendary Performer. That's why you see the lower numbers for those LPs.And the same for the rest of the catalog. Some were going to have titles like Roustabout,[/i [i]Elvis 1956 and Elvis for Everyone while others might have Elvis Now, and Elvis Presley as their non-greatest hits, non live titles.


Thanks LTB,great analysis.
I would add something more,several years ago I spoke with a BMG rep.,and he told me that between the day of Elvis, death,and the end of '77,RCA moved 20M Elvis discs in the US.
Now,Im thinking that this figure includes singles sales.Minus them,you may get a figure of 16-17M albums sold in a 4 month period.
Its plausible,of course this is assuming that he gave the right numbers,but I dont find that figure unreasonable.

Re: Billboard 1977 --> Elvis In Concert is #1!

Wed Jul 06, 2011 8:46 am

Glad I wasn't up north. Between the mall and Peaches alone, they got em all in. And for several years! A lotta people had no idea, really, what to get when it happened. So they just grabbed a few. They were up front and in the racks. They had like a whole STAND in 78 for that silly Children's Album . . .

Independents started to absolutely bloom with boots. They had some when he lived but it kinda exploded.

Within two years I had every one. Spent on nothing else and then Santa Claus! {What? You don't believe in the right jolly old elf?} And then replaced the reprocessed stereo with mono.

I was careful about CDs and then they got good.

But there were too many. RCA had put out so much random stuff over the years . . . and retailers had all this stuff.
He was contracted for 3 albums a year. Ridiculous. By the time he was 25, there was already too much product. And repetition . . .

So when it happened, it was a mess. Like a Tsunami washing up anything on the beach . . . all the good stuff and all the filler over the years.
How to account for that? People were buying so randomly. So no accuracy.

The view from Etlanna 77.

rjm

Re: Billboard 1977 --> Elvis In Concert is #1!

Wed Jul 06, 2011 1:41 pm

rjm wrote:That's because one is easily available, and fortunately, EIC is generally NOT.

Oh, there would be plenty to "care" but not the way some fans imagine.
Because the "caring" would not be postive. An understatement.

rjm


Over here in The Netherlands (how ironic), Elvis in Concert is still easily available. Both in retail and trough online shops. Not even that expensive. The biggest online retailer sells it for only 8 euro's. Add 2 euro's for shipping so for 10 euro's it's yours.

The public rating almost 5 stars out of 5. Figure that.

Re: Billboard 1977 --> Elvis In Concert is #1!

Wed Jul 06, 2011 2:00 pm

Also interesting to note that a lot of those performers on that particular chart either knew Elvis or briefly met him sometime during his career. Add the number of people from other musical fields that he met, and you realise he knew a lot of singers and groups.

Re: Billboard 1977 --> Elvis In Concert is #1!

Thu Jul 07, 2011 8:08 am

A good place to say this. Elvis "met" or bumped into or said "hi" or waved to just about every significant player . . . but this is not the same as knowing someone. That was very sad.

rjm

Re: Billboard 1977 --> Elvis In Concert is #1!

Fri Nov 11, 2011 2:29 am

Frankie Teardrop wrote:
Gregory Nolan Jr. wrote: I recall FLEETWOOD MAC being popular with my sister, but for a those


Always with the knocks on any other artist, no matter how justifiably beloved, who didn't happen to be Elvis Presley. Fleetwood Mac were popular with a hell of a lot of people, from MOR listeners to punks like me, and Rumours deserved all the sales it garnered. It is one of the finest albums ever released.
Elvis's passing was undeniably a deeply tragic passing of an era, it is a shame that EIC was the album that benefited from the attendant publicity, in my opinion. A comprehensive repackage of his classics would have been a better release.


Just seeing this now, Frank. "Always"? "Knocks on other artists"? Moi? I'm a musical omnivore and have been, in large part do to my family's attitude about music when I grew up.
I wish I didn't like so many types of music: my record collection wouldn't be so out of control. :lol:

So it wasn't a knock but my teenage sister was in fact a fan of Fleetwood Mac (and nominaly that of Elvis, unlike my siblings) and that album (8-track in our house ) got a lot of play. I heard it quite a bit and when I hear some of
it today I can appreciate it although for awhile it was played out. Perhaps it was my youth, but the people I knew who liked punk or hard rock generally weren't big
Mac fans as it was a real pop hit more than anything. Depends where you are from, perhaps.( I also happen to love their much-earlier incarnation of a blues band and have a great boxset someone gave to me, even though normally I'm into real deal blues acts but it really cooks.)

As my full comment tried to day, it was people of my mother's age (she was also 42 that year that Elvis' passing really hit hard and affected the launching of EIC into the charts::

" I recall FLEETWOOD MAC being popular with my sister, but for a those over a certain age (by then at least 40, Elvis (and not just on country stations) was a marker of their lifetime and his death created a wave of mourning that I can safely say that was not at all matched by the outpouring upon Michael Jackson's death, although among some people, the impact was similar. This was a massive media event on a scale that was probably over-done but reflective of a real national loss of a native son "done good"..never mind the global impact.

Re: Billboard 1977 --> Elvis In Concert is #1!

Fri Nov 11, 2011 9:49 am

Everyone should get Neal and Janice Gregory's "When Elvis Died."

The media were utterly unprepared. When over 70,000 or more people descended at 3764 E.P. Blvd.,the mainstream AND hip media were caught asleep at the wheel. It was like a HUGE tornado ripped through every media outlet. No warning either. It was raw, wounds gushing all over.

Sadly, the media were READY AND WAITING for MJ's death. They knew he was deeply troubled to the point where something was gonna happen. I knew it but I couldn't handle it anyway. You don't wanna know.
They had everything ready to go, out of the chute. Those hypocrites on stage at the televised memorial! I think maybe at least half of em were either suing him or had done so. The media prepackaged it all and delivered, trivializing the real pain people experienced with a packaged media extravaganza.

As a lifelong {we were both young children} fan, I was not only shattered, but INSULTED by the media's microwave-ready giant media event. It felt like a violation.

There was a purity to the unreadiness of the media when Elvis died. Not just because of the tech diff. The media was just so jaded and crass in 09. It was a cruelty. An insult added to injury.

rjm

Re: Billboard 1977 --> Elvis In Concert is #1!

Fri Nov 11, 2011 12:46 pm

Country Billboard isn't saying too much,the top 200 would have been special and meant a lot more. By the false and misleading post title, "Billboard 1977 --> Elvis in Concert #1", no thanks Doc. What the hell are people saying good post for? Doc. John should have his license revoked for this one just like Conrad Murray!

Re: Billboard 1977 --> Elvis In Concert is #1!

Fri Nov 11, 2011 1:00 pm

intelwild wrote:Country Billboard isn't saying too much,the top 200 would have been special and meant a lot more. By the false and misleading post title, "Billboard 1977 --> Elvis in Concert #1", no thanks Doc. What the hell are people saying good post for? Doc. John should have his license revoked for this one just like Conrad Murray!

There is nothing false or misleading about the topic title. And the subtext completely eludes you.

It is more than a little strange you equate my creation of this topic to someone convicted of involuntary manslaughter.

Re: Billboard 1977 --> Elvis In Concert is #1!

Fri Nov 11, 2011 2:14 pm

Because some people on here think that you "slaughter" this Forum each and every day.

Re: Billboard 1977 --> Elvis In Concert is #1!

Fri Nov 11, 2011 8:42 pm

Gregory Nolan Jr. wrote:Moi? I'm a musical omnivore and have been, in large part do to my family's attitude about music when I grew up.

Oui, oui!

:D :D :D :D :D


Gregory Nolan Jr. wrote:In my experience around friends and colleagues at college and community radio stations, fellow musicians, you name it, some of the biggest lunk-heads (read close-minded simpletons ) simply listened to hip-hop while many of us sampled readily from outside of experience and comfort zone.

Sure, there's been some interesting and even catchy rap but to my mind, it should have petered out long ago. It's mostly mediocre sh*t. :D


http://www.elvis-collectors.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=65424&p=973218#p973218


Gregory Nolan Jr. wrote:... it's hard to cross over and appreciate the talking style of rap as even in the same league, flow and poetry aside. I just grew up hearing too many great singers to ever fully appreciate this talent of rapping, no matter the energy and following it has. That's okay: I embrace saying "no" to some things and don't feel compelled at 42 to like music that I gave up even trying to relate to 20-plus years ago.

http://www.elvis-collectors.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=65424&p=973224#p973224

Re: Billboard 1977 --> Elvis In Concert is #1!

Fri Nov 11, 2011 8:43 pm

intelwild wrote:Because some people on here think that you "slaughter" this Forum each and every day.

Regardless of the lunatic fringe, your analogy was odd, off-topic and inappropriate.

Some people believe believe in ghosts, too. Are you one of those?

Re: Billboard 1977 --> Elvis In Concert is #1!

Fri Nov 11, 2011 9:11 pm

intelwild wrote:Because some people on here think that you "slaughter" this Forum each and every day.


This forum wouldn't be the best of its kind, packed with a reliability and depth of information that is simply unmatched WITHOUT our DOC. He works his fanny off to give us not only hard info, but often beautiful and great photo and clipping essays {those equalled only by Davide, as he would surely tell you}. This generosity for us committed fans is peerless.

Just the facts. {Go to a physics forum; rigid empiricists are blunt. And they are the foundation of all other work in such fields!}

rjm
P.S. As for Dr. Sandman jokes, OUR doctor doesn't put you to sleep. That much ought to be ageed.