Re: Elvis in St. Louis, March 1976: Reviewed by "Rolling Stone"

Wed Sep 16, 2009 4:19 am

Page 599 of Careless Love is the reason I first questioned the date. I read Nick's comments on St. Louis (I think) in the Booth article King Is Dead Hang The Doctor and I don't think they state a date. Now James isn't the best source, but again I am really going on observation and admit that. If I had to venture a guess it's that James inserted himself into the story and the 1973 date originated from that. I never heard of two St. Louis incidents other then in Peter's book and again I don't think people would rave about the 1973 date if he was half asleep. I'll PM you a few more details.

Re: Elvis in St. Louis, March 1976: Reviewed by "Rolling Stone"

Wed Sep 16, 2009 4:30 am

What is on page 599 of Careless Love?

Re: Elvis in St. Louis, March 1976: Reviewed by "Rolling Stone"

Wed Sep 16, 2009 4:35 am

What Peter wrote about the St. Louis 1976 show.

Re: Elvis in St. Louis, March 1976: Reviewed by "Rolling Stone"

Wed Sep 16, 2009 5:14 am

Mike Eder wrote:What Peter wrote about the St. Louis 1976 show.

How much do we have to pay to see a quotation today?

Re: Elvis in St. Louis, March 1976: Reviewed by "Rolling Stone"

Wed Sep 16, 2009 7:24 am

Here you go Doc
...in Charlotte he forgot lyrics, in Cincinnati he appeared "confused", and in St. Louis he was so overmedicated that Dr. Nick could barely get him out onstage. "Elvis seems weak" columnist Harper Barnes wrote of the perfunctory fifty-minute show, little wonder since, according to Dr. Nick, he didn't wake up till midway through the performance.

I took the time to look it up and the part about waking up halfway through the show was mentioned in the Booth article but not date was given. In the Down At The End Of Lonely Street we get mention of a 6-28-73 incident with the Nick quotes. Now Peter moved this to March 1976 while mentioning a 1973 St. Louis OD as well. I again may be wrong but from talking to several people who were there, (and I think it's mentioned in several books as well), Elvis was vibrant during the 1973 show. This was not the case in 1976 according to the Rolling Stone review. So if something happened in 1973 it couldn't have been before the show. Normally I'd say Peter just messed up putting the incident in 1976 but I have heard too many things about the St. Louis 1973 show that contradict Elvis being in bad shape that night.

Frankly that's why I don't really like to post about pills is because the details and the dates and the circumstances of what happened are really hard to judge.
I also have trouble with anything regarding Hamburger James and it was he who placed it in 1973. Larry Hutchinson, who taped the interviews for the 1980 trial, said that James was the least credible person he dealt with. I'm not trying to come off like I know for sure, I'm just presenting what I read or heard

Re: Elvis in St. Louis, March 1976: Reviewed by "Rolling Stone"

Wed Sep 16, 2009 8:20 am

Mike Eder wrote:Here you go Doc
...in Charlotte he forgot lyrics, in Cincinnati he appeared "confused", and in St. Louis he was so overmedicated that Dr. Nick could barely get him out onstage. "Elvis seems weak" columnist Harper Barnes wrote of the perfunctory fifty-minute show, little wonder since, according to Dr. Nick, he didn't wake up till midway through the performance.

OK, thanks.

Overmedicated does not mean overdose. In 1976-77, overmedication was a huge problem not confined to a show here or there. There is much testimony to his "waking up" mid-performance in this era.

Again, James Caughley is not the sole source of the June 1973 problem -- although the veracity and integrity of Thompson II and Cole's work is beyond question. Please revisit my previous comments for the additional data.

As noted to you privately, Elvis' performance on stage in St. Louis on June 28 is almost irrelevant to the overdose issue.

Case in point: in the 1970s, Elvis had a number of such "incidents" and made a recovery, such as what Larry Geller describes in Las Vegas in December 1976, in his book If I Can Dream: Elvis' Own Story.

Another example: Nirvana's Kurt Cobain had a July 22, 1993 overdose in New York the night before a show at the Roseland Ballroom. He recovered, and played the next evening -- no one saw anything amiss in the performance.

phpBB [video]



Nirvana - Lithium, Roseland Ballroom, July 23, 1993

What I have yet to determine is whether the mishap occurred prior to -- or after -- the June 28, 1973 performance in St. Louis.

Elvis will probably sound fine on any available St. Louis recording. Evaluating it won't do much, unless you happen to hear a sly reference to an overdose. Recall the "almost did that" ad-lib on "Good Time Charlie's Got The Blues" from the August 19, 1974 OS in Vegas? He's taking about his October 1973 OD, probably.

What is needed is to learn who was Elvis security team on that tour, and ask them. We know one for sure: James Caughley. And we already have his statement.

Who else went along for these 17 June-July shows in 1973?

Red? Sonny? Jerry? Al? Joe Esposito, probably, but his words are pretty worthless.

Re: Elvis in St. Louis, March 1976: Reviewed by "Rolling Stone"

Wed Sep 16, 2009 8:49 am

All good arguments. The lone confusing thing about the Careless Love quote pertaining to 1976 is that the source of Nick's comments is the book Down At The End Of Lonely Street. That book puts what Nick said in the context of the 1973 show Careless Love is better with dates overall, but I just want to know what led him to the 1976 placing.

Re: Elvis in St. Louis, March 1976: Reviewed by "Rolling Stone"

Wed Sep 16, 2009 8:50 am

It could simply be an oversight.

Re: Elvis in St. Louis, March 1976: Reviewed by "Rolling Stone"

Fri Sep 18, 2009 12:19 am

This is how the review looked in the 1976 issue, including the image.

Rolling Stone #213 - May 20, 1976

Image


Gold-Spangled Elvis: Flashes Of The Old Fire

Elvis Presley, Kiel Auditorium, St. Louis, Missouri - March 22nd, 1976

by Harper Barnes

These days, Elvis Presley wraps himself in the power of other people. There are ten backup singers, including a female high-note specialist and a male low-note specialist; three guitar players, including the brilliant James Burton; a bassist; a pianist on a miked grand; two drummers; an immense horn section; and god knows what else hidden in the tangle of arms and legs.

In St. Louis, where he ended a four-city mini tour that had touched Johnson City, Tennessee, Charlotte and Cincinnati, the whole human calliope was going full boil virtually all the time, embracing Elvis in a dense helix of sound. And the rock they play now is harder and louder than it used to be, a lot closer to Capricorn Records than to Sun.

Elvis seems weak, perhaps justifiably so after a prolonged battle with overweight, a battle he has only partially won and problems with his innards that sent him to the hospital. His set lasted barely 50 minutes, he loafed even more than usual and there were none of the karate chops and leaps of a few years ago.

But the fire burned through from time to time, and besides, it was Elvis Presley. You go to see him as much out of reverance for the past as from expectation for the immediate future. The auditorium, which seats 10,500, had been sold out for weeks. A crippled girl had been unable to get tickets and all she cared about in the world is Elvis Presley. There was a story in the paper and as if by magic a St. Louis massage parlor came up with a couple of ducats right up near the front for the little lady and her friend who pushes the wheelchair. There was a story about that in the paper too.

A creepy Las Vegas comedian named Jackie Kahane, who must be blackmailing Elvis or maybe is his brother-in-law told some prune juice jokes. Then it was time once again for the humble strains of 2001 (Thus Spake Zarathustra), and the rock 'n' roll obelisk named Elvis Presley hove into view. No cape this time, just basic gold-spangled black pants and vest over a ruffled and daringly low-cut baby-blue shirt.

He began with a fast "C.C. Rider" and then really ripped into "I Got A Woman," which became briefly entangled with "Amen," but soon emerged unscathed. The Instamatics were present in approximately one-to-one ratio with the bouffant hairdos and for a while the flash cubes were going off so rapidly it looked like high noon. That must have confused Elvis because, after long applause and a general rush of femininity toward the stage -- the audience was at least two-thirds women, including many mother-and-daughter combos -- he said, "I hope we have a good time this afternoon." It was about 10 P.M.

With the teasing elegance of a stripper in a room full of neck fetishists, Elvis removed and tossed into the audience two or three dozen scarves in the course of the evening, as has become his custom. If you didn't catch one, you could buy them in the lobby at five dollars apiece.

With a couple of exceptions, the remainder of the show. which seemed to be over in a blink, was devoted to a recitation of the classics. It was done quickly and perfunctorily -- with a couple of exceptions - and Elvis leaned on the band for support much of the way. There was "Don't Be Cruel," "Heartbreak Hotel," "Love Me Tender" -- lots of squeals and camera flashes on that one -- "Polk Salad Annie," "Hound Dog." Elvis sort of mumbled his way through the last, but when he was through singing, Burton took off on a glass-etching run of high notes. Elvis twitched his ass to the beat and the crowd went bonkers.

He closed with "Funny How Time Slips Away" -- yes, isn't it -- and "Can't Help Falling In Love." The crowd at the apron of the stage by then consisted of maybe 300 people jammed together, with the ones closest to Elvis reaching up desperately to touch the hem of his garment. As the last note decayed into the vast dome of the ceiling, Elvis turned on his heel and strode into the wings, followed by four or five bodyguards. The crush of women below the front of the stage squealed and waved Elvis goodbye and above the fluttering fingers, held tightly in a strong right hand, swayed a crutch.

Harper Barnes is a feature writer for the St. Louis 'Post Dispatch' and book columnist for Boston's 'Real Paper.'
Last edited by drjohncarpenter on Sat Sep 19, 2009 5:14 am, edited 3 times in total.

Re: Elvis in St. Louis, March 1976: Reviewed by "Rolling Stone"

Fri Sep 18, 2009 2:23 am

Doc is right about the problems in St. Louis in June 1973. I have read over the years though that the March 22, 1976 St. Louis show was not a very good show...the the 2 reviews notwithstanding 8)

Re: Elvis in St. Louis, March 1976: Reviewed by "Rolling Stone"

Fri Sep 18, 2009 5:05 am

As good a writer as Peter Guralnick is, it's great to see Mike (and surely others) trying to deconstruct how he assembled his second volume. Any conflating of '73 incidents with '76 performances would surely be unfortunate if done just for the sake of narrative.

That's a tough photo of Elvis to look at. I wonder how many RS readers cringed at it? The review is both enjoyable and all too true on one hand but also full of its own agenda as well.

I wonder how "bad" the show was, Mr. Sweeney. Compared to 1970 or even a year earlier, I'll concede that - relatively. I'd have to hear it, of course.

Re: Elvis in St. Louis, March 1976: Reviewed by "Rolling Stone"

Fri Sep 18, 2009 6:05 am

Hello,

Doc, you are incorrect regarding the photo that was used in Rolling Stone for the review. The photo used was a black and white image of Elvis with guitar strapped around his neck. His arms are extended out palms down. Directly behind him you see the Ludwig drum set. The photograph in Rolling Stone is credited to Joseph Sia.

Daryl

Re: Elvis in St. Louis, March 1976: Reviewed by "Rolling Stone"

Fri Sep 18, 2009 6:38 am

Can you post it?

Re: Elvis in St. Louis, March 1976: Reviewed by "Rolling Stone"

Sat Sep 19, 2009 2:33 am

Can you post it, please, Daryl??

Re: Elvis in St. Louis, March 1976: Reviewed by "Rolling Stone"

Sat Sep 19, 2009 4:57 am

Hello,

I can't do a right click and paste job but I did take a picture with my digital camera and uploaded it via imageshack. Quality isn't the greatest but here goes.

Image

Daryl

Re: Elvis in St. Louis, March 1976: Reviewed by "Rolling Stone"

Sat Sep 19, 2009 5:09 am

Daryl wrote:Quality isn't the greatest but here goes.

THAT'S IT! Thanks, Daryl -- I added it to the above post.

Now I realize two things:

(1) Rolling Stone published a VERY nice picture, for the period
(2) The image appears to date from the July 21, 1975 Greensboro show

Re: Elvis in St. Louis, March 1976: Reviewed by "Rolling Stone"

Sat Sep 19, 2009 5:18 am

Hello,

Your welcome. As you say, it's what I do. Elvis' pose reminds me of the cover to FTD's "Tucson '76".

Daryl

Re: Elvis in St. Louis, March 1976: Reviewed by "Rolling Stone"

Sat Sep 19, 2009 6:29 am

That is a great photo. Thanks for posting it Daryl and thanks for adding the large version Doc.

Re: Elvis in St. Louis, March 1976: Reviewed by "Rolling Stone"

Sat Sep 19, 2009 1:31 pm

Daryl wrote:Hello,

Your welcome. As you say, it's what I do. Elvis' pose reminds me of the cover to FTD's "Tucson '76".

Daryl

Thank you Daryl, it certainly is what you do!!

Re: Elvis in St. Louis, March 1976: Reviewed by "Rolling Stone"

Sun Sep 20, 2009 5:06 am

Hello,

It appears that Joseph Sia photo archives have a website. Here's a link to several other photos from what appears to be the same show that the photograph used in Rolling Stone.

http://www.wolfgangsvault.com/arr/elvis ... /2171.html

Daryl

Re: Elvis in St. Louis, March 1976: Reviewed by "Rolling Sto

Sun Sep 25, 2011 10:18 pm

I just have one question about this show, how true is the rumour that Elvis refused to do St louis after this show in 1976 cause a fan got carried away after gettin a kiss from Elvis. The fan rumoured to bite Elvis whe gettin a kiss. I might of just re-wrote an old thread so plz forgive me.

Re: Elvis in St. Louis, March 1976: Reviewed by "Rolling Sto

Sun Sep 25, 2011 10:52 pm

xmascarrol wrote:I just have one question about this show, how true is the rumour that Elvis refused to do St louis after this show in 1976 cause a fan got carried away after gettin a kiss from Elvis. The fan rumoured to bite Elvis whe gettin a kiss. I might of just re-wrote an old thread so plz forgive me.


He didn't refuse to perform, but according to contemporaneous accounts, he felt the need to ask the audience to calm down.

Re: Elvis in St. Louis, March 1976: Reviewed by "Rolling Sto

Mon Sep 26, 2011 8:32 pm

If I remember correctly he was bitten in the lip during the afternoon show in Charlotte on March 20th (before Burning Love) and was hit by his microphone in the mouth in St. Louis on March 22nd after which he, alledgly (sp?), stayed away from the front of the stage and cut the show short.

Re: Elvis in St. Louis, March 1976: Reviewed by "Rolling Sto

Mon Sep 26, 2011 9:01 pm

stefan kock wrote:If I remember correctly he was bitten in the lip during the afternoon show in Charlotte on March 20th (before Burning Love) and was hit by his microphone in the mouth in St. Louis on March 22nd after which he, alledgly (sp?), stayed away from the front of the stage and cut the show short.


It might be a little short for that era, but the show runs for over 50 min. so I don't think it's true. :smt006

Re: Elvis in St. Louis, March 1976: Reviewed by "Rolling Sto

Tue Sep 27, 2011 6:42 am

The audience tape from that St Louis 1976 show is 'incomplete' so its difficult to determine the show length, but 50 minutes would be a bit short.