Re: Buddy Holly - The Last Show - February 2, 1959

Fri Jan 30, 2009 12:32 pm

thefunkyangel wrote:
drjohncarpenter wrote: How weird would it be if you were one of the people who saw this show? It would haunt you forever.


Speaking of people who saw Buddy live, my mother (as a young teenager) saw Holly live in Sydney (at the Stadium) during the six date Jan/ Feb. '58 Australian Tour! When she told me I almost cried!

January 30 - Sydney Stadium - Sydney, Australia
February 1 - Sydney Stadium - Sydney, Australia
February 3 - Cloudland Ballroom - Brisbane, Australia
February 4 - West Melbourne Stadium - Melbourne, Australia
February 6 - Cloudland Ballroom - Brisbane, Australia
February 8 - Cloudland Ballroom - Brisbane, Australia



I often think about these tour dates and realize how different things would be 12 months later.

I read a letter written by Holly to his mother which was displayed in the Hard Rock Cafe in Osaka. In it he writes how slow and backward things are in Brisbane. He also wrote how friendly the Australian fans were.

Re: Buddy Holly - The Last Show - February 2, 1959

Tue Feb 03, 2009 4:03 am

here's one I had that I believe was from the last tour
Image

Re: Buddy Holly - The Last Show - February 2, 1959

Tue Feb 03, 2009 11:09 am

Hey, what a cool shot! Thank you for the upload!

Re: Buddy Holly - The Last Show - February 2, 1959

Tue Feb 03, 2009 12:07 pm

Courtesy of http://www.buddyhollyonline.com/mainwdp.html

Milkwaukee has no photo's as per this link ..
http://www.buddyhollyonline.com/WDP/milwaukee.html
I believe Kenosha can be ruled out, as per this link ..
http://www.buddyhollyonline.com/WDP/kenosha.html
Mankato is a dead link, as per this ..
http://www.buddyhollyonline.com/cory.html
Eau Claire is out, as per this link ..
http://www.buddyhollyonline.com/WDP/eauclaire.html
Montevideo is a possible as Buddy had same attire,
but the stage is different http://www.buddyhollyonline.com/WDP/montevideo.html
St. Paul is definately out, as per this link ..
http://www.buddyhollyonline.com/WDP/stpaul.html
Davenport has no photo's as per this link ..
http://www.buddyhollyonline.com/WDP/davenport.html
Ft. Dodge is a possible, as per this link ..
http://www.buddyhollyonline.com/WDP/ftdodge.html
You can even count out Duluth, as per this link ..
http://www.buddyhollyonline.com/WDP/duluth.html
Well, you can count out Green Bay, as per this link ..
http://www.buddyhollyonline.com/WDP/greenbay1.html
Clear Lake, Holly had same attire on, but the stage was different ..

Image

Re: Buddy Holly - The Last Show - February 2, 1959

Wed Feb 04, 2009 4:00 am

Fans Pack Surf Ballroom for Tribute to Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens and the Big Bopper

Wanda Jackson, Los Lonely Boys, Joe Ely, Crickets Recall 50th Anniversary of Fatal Plane Crash

February 3, 2009; Written by Jon Bream

Image

50th Anniversary Concert in Memory of Buddy Holly,
Ritchie Valens and the Big Bopper
Photo Credit: Craig Kienast


CLEAR LAKE, Iowa -- Fifty years later, a lot of things sure seemed the same at the Surf Ballroom. Poodle skirts, pompadours, the Crickets on the bandstand and the brutally cold weather with below-zero wind chill.

Feb. 3, 1959, was the day the music died as Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens and the Big Bopper perished in a snowy plane crash shortly after performing at the Surf as part of the Winter Dance Party that had crawled through the Upper Midwest in a poorly heated school bus.

On Monday night (Feb. 2), 1,800 people from 32 countries gathered in Clear Lake at the sold-out Surf to commemorate that infamous day by listening to an eclectic parade of stars -- Wanda Jackson, Graham Nash, Los Lobos, Los Lonely Boys, Joe Ely, Peter & Gordon, Dave Mason, Delbert McClinton, Bobby Vee, the Big Bopper Jr. and the Crickets, Holly's backup band.

Mary Gerber was at the concert in 1959, surprised that her parents would let a 16-year-old out on a school night. She stood up front and excitedly snapped seven photos. She rediscovered those negatives two years ago while cleaning out her mother's house. Those rare pictures -- perhaps the only ones existing of that historic night -- were on display in the lobby of Surf on Monday as Gerber returned to the ballroom for the first time in five decades. On that fateful night in 1959, she and her 18-year-old brother drove home to Walters, Minn., but he fell asleep at the wheel and the car ended up in a ditch -- and the siblings had to walk the final three miles home. She also recalled that the Surf wasn't particularly crowded that night -- not like it was on Monday.

Steven McGregor, 45, made the trip all the way from Australia -- his second ride at the Surf since 2005. "I love Buddy Holly. This is fantastic," he told CMT.com. Born in Scotland, he was making a whirlwind journey with stops in Hawaii, the Sundance Music Festival in Utah, Clear Lake and then Scotland. He didn't quite figure out what to do with the Valens replica guitar -- signed by Los Lobos and others -- he bought for $1,600 at auction at the Surf. Would he ship it home or carry it as baggage?

Bob Hale was the emcee of the concert in 1959. He announced the death of the three young stars that morning on KRIB radio after Surf manager Carroll Anderson called him to confirm their identities at the crash site a few miles north of town. Hale then phoned United Press International in Des Moines, Iowa, and the news spread around the world. Now a retired TV personality in Chicago, Hale, 75, returned to the Surf Monday to introduce J.P. Richardson Jr., aka the Big Bopper Jr. The ex-DJ shared the story of how he and the Bopper sat in a booth near the stage in 1959 and talked about how both of their wives were pregnant. He then brought his "adopted son," Bopper Jr., onstage for the Clear Lake gathering.

A showman in a faux leopard-skin jacket, Bopper Jr. reminded the rock fans that his dad wrote hits for other people, including George Jones' "White Lightning" and Johnny Preston's "Running Bear." He sang those and, of course, his father's biggest hit, "Chantilly Lace." However, this second-generation rocker wasn't the main attraction.

The Surf-goers, who looked to range in age from 8 to 80, came to hear silver-haired stars sing hits by Holly and Valens. Bob Hobart, 65, a retired high school principal from Peoria, Ill., pined for "Donna" and "La Bamba" while his son Steve, 30, a seventh grade math teacher in Clear Lake, showed up for "the party that everyone has been talking about for months." (His last visit to the Surf was to see the hard-rock band Anthrax.)

Aria Asbe-Snyder, 18, who had seen Joe Nichols and REO Speedwagon at the Surf, said "it's great to be part of history," but she had to be back at college in Mankato, Minn., by 10 the next morning. While the college freshman wore a commemorative Winter Dance Party T-shirt, many Surf-ers sported Grease-evoking outfits, pompadours and fake horn-rimmed glasses.

The five-hour program, sponsored by the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, was relatively seamless considering how many acts were involved. Cousin Brucie, a legendary New York radio disc jockey, and Sir Tim Rice, who wrote lyrics for Elton John and Andrew Lloyd Webber, served as emcees. An all-star house band featured saxophonist Bobby Keys (Rolling Stones), keyboardist Chuck Leavell (Stones, Allman Brothers), bassist Hutch Hutchinson (Bonnie Raitt) and drummer Kenny Aronoff (John Mellencamp, John Fogerty, Melissa Etheridge, Smashing Pumpkins). Two boom cameras zoomed over the ballroom crowd to capture this show for a possible TV special.

Most of the stars offered three-song sets, usually featuring at least one tune by either Holly, Valens or the Big Bopper. For instance, Wanda Jackson did Chuck Berry's "Brown Eyed Handsome Man," which Holly covered on the 1959 tour, while Ely jumped into Buddy's "Oh Boy." Graham Nash never mentioned that he used to sing in the Hollies before joining Crosby, Stills & Nash, but he did three Buddy Holly favorites, including "Every Day" with Peter & Gordon. Rocker Pat DiNizio of the Smithereens, who released a Holly tribute album this year, added a nice touch with three violinists on his three songs.

Dave Mason, formerly of Traffic, provided a change of pace with his rock hits, "We Just Disagree" and "Feelin' Alright." Los Lonely Boys tore it up with their high-octane brand of blues-rock before downshifting into their hit, "Heaven," which had the younger folks in the Surf crowd singing along. Bolstered by Keys on sax, Los Lobos rocked the house. Ely sat in with them to do "Are You Listening Lucky," and then various members of the extended Valens family and Holly's widow, Maria Elena Santiago, joined Los Lobos for a spirited, long-winded "La Bamba."

Tickets cost $85 for Monday's marathon. In 1959, young rock fans paid $1.50 to attend the Winter Dance Party at the Surf. Over the years, this classic ballroom has played host to everyone from Duke Ellington and Lawrence Welk to Merle Haggard and Montgomery Gentry. The Surf has been staging Winter Dance Party anniversaries since 1979 but none as big as this year's.

Fittingly, Sonny Curtis and the Crickets closed the evening with an extended set. Curtis reminded the folks of all the hits he'd written, including "I Fought the Law" and "Love Is All Around," the theme to The Mary Tyler Moore Show. He offered his "The Real Buddy Holly Story," his answer to the 1978 hit movie starring Gary Busey. And, of course, his trio performed the songs that they and Holly made famous -- "It's So Easy," "Raining in My Heart," "Peggy Sue" and "That'll Be the Day." They closed with an all-cast rendition of "Not Fade Away," complete with band member Tommy Allsup, a tall Texan in a cowboy hat, taking a guitar solo just as he had done 50 years ago on that same stage.

Jon Bream has been the music critic of the Minneapolis Star Tribune since 1975.

-------------------------

Rich

Re: Buddy Holly - The Last Show - February 2, 1959

Wed Feb 04, 2009 6:05 pm

Rich_TCB wrote:Fans Pack Surf Ballroom for Tribute to Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens and the Big Bopper

Wanda Jackson, Los Lonely Boys, Joe Ely, Crickets Recall 50th Anniversary of Fatal Plane Crash

February 3, 2009; Written by Jon Bream

Image

50th Anniversary Concert in Memory of Buddy Holly,
Ritchie Valens and the Big Bopper
Photo Credit: Craig Kienast



Cool! I bet it wouldn't been a lot of fun to be there (Monday that is)
CLEAR LAKE, Iowa -- Fifty years later, a lot of things sure seemed the same at the Surf Ballroom. Poodle skirts, pompadours, the Crickets on the bandstand and the brutally cold weather with below-zero wind chill.

Feb. 3, 1959, was the day the music died as Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens and the Big Bopper perished in a snowy plane crash shortly after performing at the Surf as part of the Winter Dance Party that had crawled through the Upper Midwest in a poorly heated school bus.

On Monday night (Feb. 2), 1,800 people from 32 countries gathered in Clear Lake at the sold-out Surf to commemorate that infamous day by listening to an eclectic parade of stars -- Wanda Jackson, Graham Nash, Los Lobos, Los Lonely Boys, Joe Ely, Peter & Gordon, Dave Mason, Delbert McClinton, Bobby Vee, the Big Bopper Jr. and the Crickets, Holly's backup band.

Mary Gerber was at the concert in 1959, surprised that her parents would let a 16-year-old out on a school night. She stood up front and excitedly snapped seven photos. She rediscovered those negatives two years ago while cleaning out her mother's house. Those rare pictures -- perhaps the only ones existing of that historic night -- were on display in the lobby of Surf on Monday as Gerber returned to the ballroom for the first time in five decades. On that fateful night in 1959, she and her 18-year-old brother drove home to Walters, Minn., but he fell asleep at the wheel and the car ended up in a ditch -- and the siblings had to walk the final three miles home. She also recalled that the Surf wasn't particularly crowded that night -- not like it was on Monday.

Steven McGregor, 45, made the trip all the way from Australia -- his second ride at the Surf since 2005. "I love Buddy Holly. This is fantastic," he told CMT.com. Born in Scotland, he was making a whirlwind journey with stops in Hawaii, the Sundance Music Festival in Utah, Clear Lake and then Scotland. He didn't quite figure out what to do with the Valens replica guitar -- signed by Los Lobos and others -- he bought for $1,600 at auction at the Surf. Would he ship it home or carry it as baggage?

Bob Hale was the emcee of the concert in 1959. He announced the death of the three young stars that morning on KRIB radio after Surf manager Carroll Anderson called him to confirm their identities at the crash site a few miles north of town. Hale then phoned United Press International in Des Moines, Iowa, and the news spread around the world. Now a retired TV personality in Chicago, Hale, 75, returned to the Surf Monday to introduce J.P. Richardson Jr., aka the Big Bopper Jr. The ex-DJ shared the story of how he and the Bopper sat in a booth near the stage in 1959 and talked about how both of their wives were pregnant. He then brought his "adopted son," Bopper Jr., onstage for the Clear Lake gathering.

A showman in a faux leopard-skin jacket, Bopper Jr. reminded the rock fans that his dad wrote hits for other people, including George Jones' "White Lightning" and Johnny Preston's "Running Bear." He sang those and, of course, his father's biggest hit, "Chantilly Lace." However, this second-generation rocker wasn't the main attraction.

The Surf-goers, who looked to range in age from 8 to 80, came to hear silver-haired stars sing hits by Holly and Valens. Bob Hobart, 65, a retired high school principal from Peoria, Ill., pined for "Donna" and "La Bamba" while his son Steve, 30, a seventh grade math teacher in Clear Lake, showed up for "the party that everyone has been talking about for months." (His last visit to the Surf was to see the hard-rock band Anthrax.)

Aria Asbe-Snyder, 18, who had seen Joe Nichols and REO Speedwagon at the Surf, said "it's great to be part of history," but she had to be back at college in Mankato, Minn., by 10 the next morning. While the college freshman wore a commemorative Winter Dance Party T-shirt, many Surf-ers sported Grease-evoking outfits, pompadours and fake horn-rimmed glasses.

The five-hour program, sponsored by the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, was relatively seamless considering how many acts were involved. Cousin Brucie, a legendary New York radio disc jockey, and Sir Tim Rice, who wrote lyrics for Elton John and Andrew Lloyd Webber, served as emcees. An all-star house band featured saxophonist Bobby Keys (Rolling Stones), keyboardist Chuck Leavell (Stones, Allman Brothers), bassist Hutch Hutchinson (Bonnie Raitt) and drummer Kenny Aronoff (John Mellencamp, John Fogerty, Melissa Etheridge, Smashing Pumpkins). Two boom cameras zoomed over the ballroom crowd to capture this show for a possible TV special.

Most of the stars offered three-song sets, usually featuring at least one tune by either Holly, Valens or the Big Bopper. For instance, Wanda Jackson did Chuck Berry's "Brown Eyed Handsome Man," which Holly covered on the 1959 tour, while Ely jumped into Buddy's "Oh Boy." Graham Nash never mentioned that he used to sing in the Hollies before joining Crosby, Stills & Nash, but he did three Buddy Holly favorites, including "Every Day" with Peter & Gordon. Rocker Pat DiNizio of the Smithereens, who released a Holly tribute album this year, added a nice touch with three violinists on his three songs.

Dave Mason, formerly of Traffic, provided a change of pace with his rock hits, "We Just Disagree" and "Feelin' Alright." Los Lonely Boys tore it up with their high-octane brand of blues-rock before downshifting into their hit, "Heaven," which had the younger folks in the Surf crowd singing along. Bolstered by Keys on sax, Los Lobos rocked the house. Ely sat in with them to do "Are You Listening Lucky," and then various members of the extended Valens family and Holly's widow, Maria Elena Santiago, joined Los Lobos for a spirited, long-winded "La Bamba."

Tickets cost $85 for Monday's marathon. In 1959, young rock fans paid $1.50 to attend the Winter Dance Party at the Surf. Over the years, this classic ballroom has played host to everyone from Duke Ellington and Lawrence Welk to Merle Haggard and Montgomery Gentry. The Surf has been staging Winter Dance Party anniversaries since 1979 but none as big as this year's.

Fittingly, Sonny Curtis and the Crickets closed the evening with an extended set. Curtis reminded the folks of all the hits he'd written, including "I Fought the Law" and "Love Is All Around," the theme to The Mary Tyler Moore Show. He offered his "The Real Buddy Holly Story," his answer to the 1978 hit movie starring Gary Busey. And, of course, his trio performed the songs that they and Holly made famous -- "It's So Easy," "Raining in My Heart," "Peggy Sue" and "That'll Be the Day." They closed with an all-cast rendition of "Not Fade Away," complete with band member Tommy Allsup, a tall Texan in a cowboy hat, taking a guitar solo just as he had done 50 years ago on that same stage.

Jon Bream has been the music critic of the Minneapolis Star Tribune since 1975.

-------------------------

Rich

Re: Buddy Holly - The Last Show - February 2, 1959

Wed Feb 04, 2009 6:07 pm

thefunkyangel wrote:Clear Lake, Holly had same attire on, but the stage was different ..

Image


different shirt and ascot/tie(?) also

Image

Re: Buddy Holly - The Last Show - February 2, 1959

Thu Feb 05, 2009 12:45 pm

drjohncarpenter wrote:Ellos tienen que jugar?


ben wrote: yes they have to play


BEN

why oh why do you have to post such silly comments all the time, please stop everyone knows you post alot we havent forgotten you!!!! but you really are getting annoying, if you dont have anything of value to add why try and sabotage somone elses thread, especially ones that are informative and interesting to read.
i may be the only one who thinks this and if i am i apologise and retract my comments but you are really just showing your ignorance to other posters with these inane comments that are worthless, maybe when youve reached 5000 posts you'll stop.

Re: Buddy Holly - The Last Show - February 2, 1959

Sat Feb 07, 2009 5:02 am

JamesVRoy wrote:here's one I had that I believe was from the last tour...


Image

Buddy Holly, Tommy Allsup
Friday, January 30, 1959
Laramar Ballroom, Fort Dodge IA

Re: Buddy Holly - The Last Show - February 2, 1959

Sat Feb 07, 2009 5:31 am

drjohncarpenter wrote:
JamesVRoy wrote:here's one I had that I believe was from the last tour...


Image

Buddy Holly, Tommy Allsup
Friday, January 30, 1959
Laramar Ballroom, Fort Dodge IA


Yup you got that, the full version is here if you follow that link the funky angel posted
http://www.buddyhollyonline.com/WDP/lassiter.html

Re: Buddy Holly - The Last Show - February 2, 1959

Sun Feb 08, 2009 9:32 pm

can anyone tell me if "Two -Timin Woman" a home recording by the then 12- year old Charles Holley
has appeared on a official release as yet. I first heard this 14 years ago on some bootleg. I think that recording demonstrates even at 12 years of age, Buddy was going to be an awesome talent and a great guitar picker, whether Elvis had come along or not. Also , what about other home recordings then?
Last edited by walter hale on Sun Feb 08, 2009 9:39 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Re: Buddy Holly - The Last Show - February 2, 1959

Sun Feb 08, 2009 9:39 pm

walter hale wrote:can anyone tell me if "Two -Timin Woman" a home recording by the then 12- year old Charles Holley
has appeared on a official release as yet. I first heard this 14 years ago on some bootleg. I think that recording demonstrates even as at 12 years of age, buddy was going to be an awesome talent and great guitar picker, whether Elvis had come along or not. Also , what about other home recordings then?


Yes, it can be found on the recently released "Down the Line: The Rarities" CD set. It is wonderful to have this material that has only been available on bootlegs for years now in crystal clear quality.

Re: Buddy Holly - The Last Show - February 2, 1959

Sun Feb 08, 2009 9:43 pm

Oh wonderful!!

It's too bad similar recordings of Elvis at a similar age haven't surfaced, especially since Mom and Dad bought their young boy a geetar.

Re: Buddy Holly - The Last Show - February 2, 1959

Sun Feb 08, 2009 9:45 pm

walter hale wrote:can anyone tell me if "Two -Timin Woman" a home recording by the then 12- year old Charles Holley
has appeared on a official release as yet. I first heard this 14 years ago on some bootleg. I think that recording demonstrates even as at 12 years of age, buddy was going to be an awesome talent and great guitar picker, whether Elvis had come along or not. Also , what about other home recordings then?


It was originally released in May 1986 on an EP record issued by Holly's House (run by his brothers Larry and Travis Holley). It also includes I'll Just Pretend, Don't Come Back Knockin' and Brown Eyed Handsome Man. I got that record.

It was also reported that's it's going to included in this set which will be released this year. I don't know have this set actually been released yet.

BUDDY HOLLY - COMPLETE

My Two-Timin’ Woman (1949) (2:15)
I’ll Just Pretend (1952) (2:19)
Take These Shackles From My Heart (1952) (1:49)
Footprints In The Snow (1953) (1:20)
Flower Of My Heart (undubbed) (1954/55) (2:36)
Door To My Heart (undubbed) (1954/’55) (2:24)
Soft Place In My Heart (undubbed) (1954/’55) (2:16)
Gotta Get You Near Me Blues (undubbed) (1954’55) (1:54)
I Gambled My Heart (undubbed) (1954/’55) (2:44)
Flower Of My Heart (overdubbed – The Fireballs) (poss. October 6, 1963)
Door To My Heart (overdubbed – The Fireballs) (poss. 10/6/63)
Soft Place In My Heart (overdubbed – The Fireballs) (poss. 10/6/63)
Gotta Get You Near Me Blues (overdubbed – the Fireballs) (poss. 10/6/63)
I Gambled My Heart (overdubbed – The Fireballs) (poss. 10/6/63)
You And I Are Through (August 1955) (2:05)
Baby It’s Love (August 1955)
Memories (August 1955) (2:14)
Queen Of The Ballroom (August 1955)
Soft Place In My Heart (2nd version) (August 1955)
Memories (2nd version) (August 1955)
You And I Are Through (overdubbed – The Fireballs) (between October 1963 and December 1964)
Baby It’s Love (overdubbed – The Fireballs) (between October 1963 and December 1964)
Memories (overdubbed – The Fireballs) (between October 1963 and December 1964)
Queen Of The Ballroom (overdubbed – The Fireballs (between October 1963 and December 1964)
Down The Line (June 7, 1955) (2:04)
You And I Are Through (June 7, 1955) (2:04)
Baby Let’s Play House (Mid-1955) (2:28)
Down The Line (Mid-1955) (2:28)
Baby Let’s Play House (overdubbed – The Fireballs between May 1962 and December 1964)
Moonlight Baby (a/k/a Baby Won’t You Come Out Tonight) (December 7, 1955) (1:58)
Down The Line (overdubbed – The Fireballs between May 1962 and December 1964)
Don’t Come Back Knockin’ (December 7, 1955) (2:00)
I Guess I Was Just A Fool (December 7, 1955) (2:19)
Love Me (December 7, 1955) (1:53)
Love Me (Nashville, January 26, 1956) (2:08)
Don’t Come Back Knockin’ (Nashville, January 26, 1956) (2:16)
Midnight Shift (Nashville, January 26, 1956) (2:13)
Blue Days, Black Nights (Nashville, January 26, 1956) (2:06)
Baby Won’t You Come Out Tonight (Clovis, February/April, 1956) (1:57)
I Guess I Was Just A Fool (Clovis, February/April, 1956)(2:16)
It’s Not My Fault (Clovis, February/April, 1956) (1:20)
I’m Gonna Set My Foot Down (Clovis, February/April, 1956) (2:18)
Changin’ All Those Changes (Clovis, Feb/April, 1956) (1:41)
Rock-A-Bye Rock (Clovis, Feb/April, 1956) (2:23)
Because I Love You (Clovis, Feb/April, 1956) (2:41)
Baby, Won’t You Come Out Tonight (overdubbed The Fireballs betw. May ‘62/January ’63)
Because I Love You (overdubbed – The Fireballs betw. May ‘62/January ’63)
Changin’ All Those Changes (overdubbed – The Fireballs betw. May ’62/January ’63)
I’m Gonna Set My Foot Down (overdubbed – The Fireballs)
Betw. May ‘62/January ’63)
It’s Not My Fault (overdubbed – The Fireballs betw. May ‘62/January ’63)
Rock-A-Bye Rock (overdubbed – The Fireballs betw. May ‘62/January ’63)
Rock Around With Ollie Vee (fragment) (Nashville, July 22, 1956)
Rock Around With Ollie Vee (Nashville, 7/22/56) (2:14)
I’m Changing All Those Changes (Nashville, 7/22/56) (2:29 with fragment)
That’ll Be The Day (Nashville, 7/22/56) (2:28)
Girl On My Mind (Nashville, 7/22/56) (2:18)
Ting-A-Ling (Nash, 7/22/56) (2:42)
Rock Around With Ollie Vee (Nashville, November 15, 1956) (2:16)
Modern Don Juan (11/15/56) (2:41)
You Are My One Desire (false start) (11/15/56) (0:09)
You Are My One Desire (11/15/56) (2:24)
Gone (Garage tapes)(Nov/Dec 1956) (1:13)
Gone (alternate 1) (Garage tapes) (Nov/Dec 1956) (1:16)
Gone (alternate 2) (Garage) (Nov/Dec 1956)(1:12)
Have You Ever Been Lonely (garage) (Nov/Dec 1956) (1:18)
Have You Ever Been Lonely – Garage (alternate 1) (:54) (Nov/Dec 1956) (0:56)
Have You Ever Been Lonely - Garage (alternate 2) (Nov/Dec 1956)(1:22)
Brown-Eyed Handsome Man (garage) (Nov/Dec 1956)(2:09)
Good Rockin’ Tonight (garage) (Nov/Dec 1956) (1:59)
Rip It Up (garage) (Nov/Dec 1956) (1:25)
Blue Monday (garage) (Nov/Dec 1956) (1:58)
Honky Tonk (garage) (Nov/Dec 1956) (3:27)
Blue Suede Shoes (garage) (Nov/Dec 1956) (1:53)
Shake Rattle And Roll (incomplete) (garage) (Nov/Dec 1956) (1:21)
Bo Diddley (garage) (Nov/Dec 1956) (2:19)
Ain’t Got No Home (garage) (Nov/Dec 1956) (2:01)
Holly Hop (garage) (Nov/Dec 1956) (1:39)
Gone (overdubbed The Fireballs, October 6, 1963)
Rip It Up (overdubbed The Fireballs, October 6, 1963)
Honky Tonk (overdubbed The Fireballs, October 6, 1963)
Blue Suede Shoes (overdubbed The Fireballs, October 6, 1963)
Shake Rattle And Roll (overdubbed The Fireballs, October 6, 1963)
Have You Ever Been Lonely (overdubbed The Fireballs, October 6, 1963)
Good Rockin’ Tonight (overdubbed The Fireballs, October 6, 1963)
Blue Monday (overdubbed The Fireballs, October 6, 1963)
Ain’t Got No Home (overdubbed The Fireballs, October 6, 1963)
Holly Hop (overdubbed The Fireballs, October 6, 1963)
Brown-Eyed Handsome Man (Clovis, Dec. ‘56/Jan ’57) (2:05)
Bo Diddley (Clovis, Dec. ‘56/’57)
Brown-Eyed Handsome Man (overdubbed The Fireballs, between May 1962 and Feb. 1963)
Bo Diddley (overdubbed The Fireballs, between May 1962 and Feb. 1963)
I’m Looking For Someone To Love (Feb 24./25, 1957) (1:58)
That’ll Be The Day (Feb 24/25, 1957) (2:18)
Last Night (March 12, 1957) (not master)(1:56)
Maybe Baby (March 12, 1957) (not master)(2:00)
Words Of Love (March 12, 1957) (not master) (1:35)
Last Night (overdub session w/The Picks) (October 12/14, 1957) (master) (1:56)
Maybe Baby (overdub session w/Picks) (October 12/14, 1957) (2:04)
Words Of Love (April 8, 1957) (1:56)
Mailman Bring Me No More Blues (April 8, 1957) (2:13)
Not Fade Away (incomplete master/alternate)(May 29, 1957)(1:35)
Not Fade Away (May 29, 1957) (2:22)
Everyday (May 29, 1957) (2:09)
Ready Teddy (May/July 1957) (1:33)
Valley Of Tears (May/July 1957) (2:01)
Tell Me How (May/July 1957) (2:01)
Peggy Sue (alternate) (June 29/July 1, 1957) (2:34)
Peggy Sue (June 29/July 1, 1957) (2:31)
Listen To Me (June 29/July 1, 1957) (2:22)
That’ll Be The Day Jingle for Bob Thiele (June 29/July 1, 1957) (0:36)
That’ll Be The Day Jingle for Murray Deutsch (June 29/July 1, 1957) (0:35)
Oh Boy (undubbed) (June 25/July 1, 1957) (2:09)
Oh Boy (overdubbed master) (August 19, 1957) (2:09)
I’m Gonna Love You Too (July 1, 1957) (2:14)
Send Me Some Lovin’ (undubbed July 20, 1957) (2:37)
It’s Too Late (undubbed July 20, 1957) (2:24)
Send Me Some Lovin’ (overdub session Oct 12/14, 1957) (2:35)
It’s Too Late (overdub session Oct 12/14, 1957) (2:24)
Tell Me How (overdub session Oct 12/14, 1957) (2:01)
An Empty Cup (And A Broken Date) (Sept 30, overdub Oct 12/14, 1957) (2:14)
Rock Me My Baby (Sept 30, overdub Oct 12/14, 1957) (1:51)
You’ve Got Love (Sept 30, overdub Oct 12/14, 1957) (2:09)
Maybe Baby (Sept 30, overdub Oct 12/14, 1957) (2:03)
Little Baby (December 19, 1957) (1:58)
(You’re So Square) Baby I Don’t Care (12/19/57) (1:37)
Look At Me (12/19/57) (2:08)
Mona (version 1) (12/57 or 4/58)(1:17)
Mona (version 2) (12/57 or 4/58)(3:27)
Mona (version 3) (12/57 or 4/58) (2:47)
Rave On (Jan 25/26,, 1958) (1:50)
That’s My Desire (false start/incomplete take) (Jan 25/26, 1958)
That’s My Desire (Jan 25/26, 1958)
That’s My Desire (overdub session The Fireballs poss. 2/3/68)
Well…All Right (Feb 12, 1958) (2:15)
Take Your Time (inc. version 1) (2/14/58)
Take Your Time (inc. version 2) (2/14/58)
Take Your Time (version 3) (2/14/58)
Take Your Time (2/14/58) (1:58)
Fool’s Paradise (version 1) (2/14/58)
Fool’s Paradise (version 2) (2/14/58)
Fool’s Paradise (version 3) (2/14/58) (2:31)
Think It Over (false start 1) (2/14/58)
Think It Over (false start 2) (2/14/58)
Think It Over (version 1) (2/14/58)
Think It Over (version 2) (2/14/58)
Think It Over (version 3) (2/14/58)
Fool’s Paradise (version 3) (overdub session, piano, The Roses vocal group) (2/19/58) (2:31)
Think It Over (version 3) (overdub session, piano, The Roses) (2/1958) (1:47)
Lonesome Tears (May 25/27, 1958) (1:49)
It’s So Easy (May 25/27, 1958) (2:10)
Heartbeat (May 25, 1958) (2:10)
Love’s Made A Fool Of You (undubbed) (June 2, 1958)
Wishing (June 2, 1958) (2:05)
Love’s Made A Fool Of You (overdubbed w/handclaps) (January 7, 1964) (2:01)
Wishing (overdubbed rhythm guitar, Jan-Dec 1964) (2:05)
Early In The Morning (June 19, 1958) (2:08)
Now We’re One (fragment) (June 19, 1958)
Now We’re One (June 19, 1958)
Come Back Baby (Sept. 10, 1958)
Reminiscing (undubbed – prev. unreleased, don’t know if we have) (September 10, 1958)
Reminiscing (first overdub session) (1962)
Reminiscing (second overdub session) (Oct. 29, 1962)
True Love Ways (mono mix) (Oct. 21, 1958)
True Love Ways (stereo) (Oct. 21, 1958) (2:50)
It Doesn’t Matter Anymore (mono) (Oct. 21, 1958)
It Doesn’t Matter Anymore (stereo) (Oct. 21, 1958) ((2:06)
Raining In My Heart (mono) (Oct. 21, 1958)
Raining In My Heart (stereo) (Oct. 21, 1958) (2:48)
Moonbeams (mono) (Oct. 21, 1958)
Moonbeams (stereo) (Oct. 21, 1958)
That’s What They Say (undubbed) (Dec. 3, 1958)
What To Do (undubbed) (December 3, 1958)
Peggy Sue Got Married (undubbed) (December 5, 1958)
That Makes It Tough (undubbed) (December 5, 1958)
Crying, Waiting, Hoping (undubbed) (December 14, 1958)
Learning The Game (undubbed) December 14, 1958)
Peggy Sue Got Married (Hansen New York overdub session) (June 30, 1959)
Crying, Waiting, Hoping (Hansen New York overdub session) (June 30, 1959)
That’s What They Say (Hansen New York overdub session) (Jan 1, 1960)
What To Do (Hansen New York overdub) (Jan 1, 1960)
Learning The Game (Hansen New York overdub) (Jan 1, 1960)
That Makes It Tough (Hansen New York overdub) (Jan 1, 1960)
What To Do (Fireballs overdub session) (June 1962/December 1963)
Peggy Sue Got Married (Fireballs overdub) (6/62 – 12/63)
Crying, Waiting, Hoping (Fireballs overdub (6/62 – 12/63)
That Makes It Tough (Fireballs overdub) (6/62 – 12/63)
That’s What They Say (Fireballs overdub) (6/62 – 12/63)
Learning The Game (Fireballs overdub) (6/62 – 12/63)
You’re The One (orig session) (12/27/58)
You’re The One (Fireballs overdub) (12/67 – 12/68)
Wait ‘Til The Sun Shines Nellie (undubbed) (Jan 1959)
Slippin’ And Slidin’ (slow version 1 undubbed) (Jan 1959)
Slippin’ And Slidin’ (slow version 2 undubbbed)(Jan 1959)
Slippin’ And Slidin’ (fast version undubbed) (Jan 1959)
Dearest (incomplete undubbed version) (Jan 1959)
Dearest (undubbed) (January 1959)
Love Is Strange (undubbed) (January 1959)
Smokey Joe’s Café (undubbed) (January 1959)
Untitled Instrumental (January 1959)
Dearest (Fireballs overdub session) (1962-1963)
Slippin’ And Slidin’ (slow version 2)(overdub session) (1962-1963)
Wait ‘Til The Sun Shines Nellie (Fireballs overdub version 1)(prob. October 29, 1962)
Wait ‘Til The Sun Shines Nellie (Fireballs overdub version 2) (prob. October 29, 1962)
Love Is Strange (Fireballs overdub session) (circa 1968)
Slippin’ And Slidin’ (fast version) (Fireballs overdub session) (circa 1968)
Dearest (incomplete version Fireballs overdub) (circa 1968)
Smokey Joe’s Café (Fireballs overdub) (circa 1968)

Re: Buddy Holly - The Last Show - February 2, 1959

Sun Feb 08, 2009 9:54 pm

thanx for the info.

pretty awesome stuff indeed!!!

According to author John Beecher, "I guess i was just a fool" was Buddy emulating Elvis, "I forgot to remember to forget her". They're very similar songs.

Re: Buddy Holly - The Last Show - February 2, 1959

Sun Feb 08, 2009 10:29 pm

you know the more I think of this; why hasn't there been home recordings of a young 11-12 year old Elvis the way that there was/is of a youthfull Charles Hardin Holley?

Legend has it that the Holley family, like the Presley's, very much loved to get together for singalongs - albeit more so with the Presley's as they were also avid church goers.

Surely Vernon or Uncle Vester would've kept or had access to a tape recorder machine.

Re: Buddy Holly - The Last Show - February 2, 1959

Sun Feb 08, 2009 11:09 pm

It might have something to do with Presleys being dirt poor. Whereas Holleys were better off I think. They were middle class.

Re: Buddy Holly - The Last Show - February 2, 1959

Sun Feb 08, 2009 11:11 pm

And so how do you know the Holley's were middle class?!

Re: Buddy Holly - The Last Show - February 2, 1959

Sun Feb 08, 2009 11:23 pm

Surely Vernon or Uncle Vester would've kept or had access to a tape recorder machine.


Not unless they knew Dr Who!

The 11/12 year old Elvis in 1946/4.

Tape recorders have yet to be made in those days!

Re: Buddy Holly - The Last Show - February 2, 1959

Sun Feb 08, 2009 11:51 pm

oh of course. It would've had to have been reel to reel player/recorder.

Re: Buddy Holly - The Last Show - February 2, 1959

Mon Feb 09, 2009 12:45 am

walter hale wrote:And so how do you know the Holley's were middle class?!


Well, maybe they weren't middle class but reading the excellent bio Remembering Buddy - The Definitive Biography by John Goldrosen and John Beecher one get's the impression that they were little better off than Presleys. For starters Hollys father didn't land in jail for forgering a check and they didn't have to live in federal funded housing projects. Even though Hollys mother says they were poor Buddy's family friends remember that their children were always well provided: "...in spite of their low income, [Holleys] always managed to come up with money for what they thought was important for their children - including musical instruments and lessons" (quote from the book p. 13). And I'm not saying the Presleys didn't do what they thought was the best for Elvis but they simply lacked the means. Or maybe they never even thought about recording their sons singing?

Re: Buddy Holly - The Last Show - February 2, 1959

Mon Feb 09, 2009 1:18 am

walter hale wrote:oh of course. It would've had to have been reel to reel player/recorder.


Nope! Those didn't come on the market until about 1950!

The only practical way then was to make an acetate at a radio station or recording studio.

Re: Buddy Holly - The Last Show - February 2, 1959

Mon Feb 09, 2009 2:35 am

Marko wrote:It might have something to do with Presleys being dirt poor. Whereas Holleys were better off I think. They were middle class.

Correct.

Also, as anyone who knows the early Presley story may tell you, Elvis did not begin to strongly pursue music until his high school years, his first truly significant step being his Thursday, April 9, 1953 appearance at the Humes High Annual Minstrel Show.

Elvis was 18 years old, and less than two months from graduating.

Re: Buddy Holly - The Last Show - February 2, 1959

Mon Feb 09, 2009 4:22 am

I see. Thanx Doc. However I was of the understanding Elvis as a child was "pursuing music" by singing spirituals along with his parents mainly at Sunday church get togethers. That date you mentioned (quite interesting BTW) would the source of it be George Klein?

Re: Buddy Holly - The Last Show - February 2, 1959

Mon Feb 09, 2009 10:44 am

Marko wrote:
walter hale wrote:It was also reported that's it's going to included in this set which will be released this year. I don't know have this set actually been released yet.

BUDDY HOLLY - COMPLETE


That's not released yet. Bill Griggs is involved with research for this set and has mentioned this set is due late spring. I'll believe it when I see it. I do believe Bill Griggs to be an honest man but he doesn't call the shots at Universal / Geffen so we'll have to wait and see. I have not seen any information directly from Geffen / Universal regarding this set.

Also it's not complete but I suppose the track listing will be changed as Bill Griggs will no doubt point out the missing songs. Remains to be seen to what extent all the tracks can be licensed.