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Re: Elvis in the '60s

Tue Dec 04, 2012 1:17 am

As a point of reference, here are the Billboard charts from the week the soundtrack EP was released.

Dr. H.T. Nelson, DOR
"It's What I Do"
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Re: Elvis in the '60s

Tue Dec 04, 2012 2:00 am

Blue River wrote:
drjohncarpenter wrote:If you look with care at my original post, FECC member jbnva58 watched the show, and recalled it was a birthday tribute. Perhaps he misremembered.

And perhaps a bad choice on your part for a source ...

Perhaps not.

A primary source is almost always preferable to using an author as a source whose work is well-known for factual errors. This advice will serve you well if you take the time to acknowledge it.

And always remember that arguing a side-issue is never as important as presenting a clear, coherent main thesis.

::rocks

Re: Elvis in the '60s

Tue Dec 04, 2012 2:04 am

HoneyTalkNelson wrote:As a point of reference, here are the Billboard charts from the week the soundtrack EP was released.

Thanks for underscoring my point.

Some landmark recordings, not to mention damn fine pop singles, are in abundance. No wonder that month Elvis fell, hit his head, got concussed, delayed the start of "Clambake," dumped his spiritual books and advocates, and signed an insane management contract that paid 50% commission.

It was a bad time.

Re: Elvis in the '60s

Tue Dec 04, 2012 2:40 am

I'm glad to enlighten.

Hey, it's what I do!

Dr. H.T. Nelson, DBTC
"Just the Facts"

Re: Elvis in the '60s

Tue Dec 04, 2012 3:05 am

drjohncarpenter wrote:
Blue River wrote:
drjohncarpenter wrote:If you look with care at my original post, FECC member jbnva58 watched the show, and recalled it was a birthday tribute. Perhaps he misremembered.

And perhaps a bad choice on your part for a source ...

Perhaps not.
A primary source is almost always preferable...

Yeah, almost.

My, my... I'm glad jbnva58 didn't convince you that he/she saw Bigfoot or the Loch Ness monster on the show!


drjohncarpenter wrote:And always remember that arguing a side-issue is never as important as presenting a clear, coherent main thesis.

Your history on FECC clearly shows that you're the one that needs to "always remember" that.


::rocks

Re: Elvis in the '60s

Tue Dec 04, 2012 2:42 pm

I watched again on Youtube "You Gotta Stop" from ECEG movie, and again to me Elvis look great in black and moves a lot. It's a a minor rocker ok, I admit, but is far better than many others including some from the Roustabout LP (It's Carnival Time).

Re: Elvis in the '60s

Tue Dec 04, 2012 4:12 pm

jurasic1968 wrote:I watched again on Youtube "You Gotta Stop" from ECEG movie, and again to me Elvis look great in black and moves a lot. It's a a minor rocker ok, I admit, but is far better than many others including some from the Roustabout LP (It's Carnival Time).


Well said, I agree.

Re: Elvis in the '60s

Tue Dec 04, 2012 4:26 pm

jurasic1968 wrote:I watched again on Youtube "You Gotta Stop" from ECEG movie, and again to me Elvis look great in black and moves a lot. It's a a minor rocker ok, I admit, but is far better than many others including some from the Roustabout LP (It's Carnival Time).


Roustabout is a different entity entirely - it's no classic but at least Elvis's character has some of the rebel-like elements that were in, say, Jailhouse Rock and King Creole. As a film it also benefits from having an A-list star alongside Elvis in Barbara Stanwyck, who not only had a won an Emmy in 1961, but who also was having something a career boost thanks to her role in the then-controversial Walk on the Wild Side from 1962.

Roustabout had solid production values, a decent script, Elvis in good form and an attractive setting. ECEG had an appalling script, appalling songs, poor pacing, an increasingly uncomfortable looking Elvis, and scenes of yoga and people getting covered in food.

It's Carnival Time is little more than a plot song (although it fits nicely within the scenario of the film), whereas You Gotta Stop is one of the key songs in the film. Yes, it's probably the best of a sorry bunch, but the fact that Elvis moves a lot really isn't saying much - they are called moving pictures for a reason!

Re: Elvis in the '60s

Tue Dec 04, 2012 5:17 pm

HoneyTalkNelson wrote:As a point of reference, here are the Billboard charts from the week the soundtrack EP was released.

Dr. H.T. Nelson, DOR
"It's What I Do"

You have to admit even though Elvis was not burning up the charts, there was some damn fine music being made by others. A great time in pop music, much more so than the 70's to now.

Re: Elvis in the '60s

Tue Dec 04, 2012 9:21 pm

r&b wrote:
HoneyTalkNelson wrote:As a point of reference, here are the Billboard charts from the week the soundtrack EP was released.

You have to admit even though Elvis was not burning up the charts, there was some damn fine music being made by others. A great time in pop music, much more so than the 70's to now.

Only someone blind, or willfully ignorant, could possibly dismiss the great music on those March 1967 charts.

No wonder Elvis fell and hit his head. At that point, he had given up.

Re: Elvis in the '60s

Wed Dec 05, 2012 2:15 am

Who did thus?

Re: Elvis in the '60s

Sat Dec 15, 2012 5:25 pm

I tend to meditate on the Mark Knopfler's song: " Back To Tupelo " from his album Shangri-La.

Re: Elvis in the '60s

Thu Dec 20, 2012 10:23 pm

Tornado wrote:I tend to meditate on the Mark Knopfler's song: " Back To Tupelo " from his album Shangri-La.


Don't know it, but like the lyrics I see online:

Back to Tupelo
Around the time of "Clambake"
Movie number twenty-five
You and the lying Dutchman
Are still in overdrive
You’re as strong as when you started
Mississippi in your soul
You can still be Marlon Brando
And the king of rock 'n' roll

It isn’t just the records
No, you must have Hollywood
The songs alone are not enough
That much is understood
You’ll soon be back in Memphis
Maybe then you’ll know what to do
The storylines they’re giving you
Are just not ringing true

Oh, it’s a ways to go
Back to Tupelo

When you’re young and beautiful
Your dreams are all ideals
Later on it’s not the same
Lord, everything is real
Sixteen hundred miles of highway
Roll back to the truth
And a song to give your mother
In your first recording booth

Around the time of "Clambake"
That old dream’s still rolling on
Sometimes there’ll be the feeling
Things are going wrong
The morning star is fading
Lord, the Mississippi's cold
You can still be Marlon Brando
And the king of rock 'n' roll

But it’s a ways to go
Back to Tupelo


Re: Elvis in the '60s

Fri Dec 21, 2012 2:52 am

With all this discussion about Elvis's career suicide in the 60s, I wonder if the female fans felt it was as bad as it seems when picked apart technically. It seems there were always Rock artists who came later and wondered what happened to their hero, but was he really that disappointing to his female fans? Some even site "Are You Lonesome Tonight" as a bad tune because they would rather have heard a raw rocker, but i doubt too many female fans disliked it. I know a lot of women who are Elvis fans, and I rarely hear them get technical about his career in the 60s. Sure, they wish he had continued touring, and they have their favorite hairstyle, etc., but basically, they just like Elvis no matter what he did.

Re: Elvis in the '60s

Fri Dec 21, 2012 3:21 am

showfan wrote:With all this discussion about Elvis's career suicide in the 60s, I wonder if the female fans felt it was as bad as it seems when picked apart technically. It seems there were always Rock artists who came later and wondered what happened to their hero, but was he really that disappointing to his female fans? Some even site "Are You Lonesome Tonight" as a bad tune because they would rather have heard a raw rocker, but i doubt too many female fans disliked it. I know a lot of women who are Elvis fans, and I rarely hear them get technical about his career in the 60s. Sure, they wish he had continued touring, and they have their favorite hairstyle, etc., but basically, they just like Elvis no matter what he did.


Some female fans did some female fans didn't just like the men.

A lot of Elvis fans liked Elvis because of those early records that's why they continued to support him.

When they went to see him in concert they wanted him to sing ''Love me tender', ''Teddy bear'' or don't be cruel'' etc.

That he wasn't cutting good songs anymore in 1965 was less important to some fans because they grew up, got married and had other things going on in their lives.

They still had those great hits prior to the career decline to listen to and they remembered Elvis that way.

I would say the majority of casual Elvis fans felt that way towards him.

Some female fans liked ''Are you lonesome tonight'' while some didn't just like with the men.

Re: Elvis in the '60s

Fri Dec 21, 2012 12:52 pm

brian wrote:
showfan wrote:With all this discussion about Elvis's career suicide in the 60s, I wonder if the female fans felt it was as bad as it seems when picked apart technically. It seems there were always Rock artists who came later and wondered what happened to their hero, but was he really that disappointing to his female fans? Some even site "Are You Lonesome Tonight" as a bad tune because they would rather have heard a raw rocker, but i doubt too many female fans disliked it. I know a lot of women who are Elvis fans, and I rarely hear them get technical about his career in the 60s. Sure, they wish he had continued touring, and they have their favorite hairstyle, etc., but basically, they just like Elvis no matter what he did.


Some female fans did some female fans didn't just like the men.

A lot of Elvis fans liked Elvis because of those early records that's why they continued to support him.

When they went to see him in concert they wanted him to sing ''Love me tender', ''Teddy bear'' or don't be cruel'' etc.

That he wasn't cutting good songs anymore in 1965 was less important to some fans because they grew up, got married and had other things going on in their lives.

They still had those great hits prior to the career decline to listen to and they remembered Elvis that way.

I would say the majority of casual Elvis fans felt that way towards him.

Some female fans liked ''Are you lonesome tonight'' while some didn't just like with the men.



What you say is correct Brian. My older brother and sister who were into Elvis big time during the 50's were married and raising families by the mid 60's, so they by then were'nt really following his career, that was left to thier kid brother - Me :wink:

Re: Elvis in the '60s

Fri Dec 21, 2012 6:55 pm

People who succumbed to the trends, like Sammy David Jr, DIon, Tim Buckley, Bobby Darin, etc, only embarrassed themselves. I think if Elvis tried to follow the trends instead of isololating himself, would have never had the Comeback, and his 1969-1971 period would never have been.

However, I think the Las Vegas years created just as much boredom and mediocrity as the movie years did. That is when he would have benefitted most with better material sources and maybe more of a stripped down, unplugged if you will, approach.

Re: Elvis in the '60s

Fri Dec 21, 2012 6:57 pm

But, for the most part, the studio recordings ranged from above average to outstanding in the 60s. The Lost Album and Tommorow Is A Long Time CDs are proof of that.

Re: Elvis in the '60s

Fri Dec 21, 2012 7:19 pm

Following the trends? I am saying one more time: Roy Orbison had big hits in the middle 60's in spite of the British Invasion. I am just tired ot those silly arguments like: if Elvis didn't do such bad movies and soundtracks from 1964 to 1968 the 1968 Comeback Special never happened. But if Elvis sang only Christmas songs in the special, like the Colonel wanted? And what if Elvis had some TV shows between 1960 to 1968? And what about others guest appearances between 1968 to 1973? Elvis after 1960 unfortunately lost the connection with the TV shows (thanks, again, Colonel!!!!). Like one reviewer wrote before: even in the 50's if 4 millions watched Jailhouse Rock on movie theaters, 55 millions saw the Ed Sullivan shows. After the Sinatra TV Timex special from 1960 - again watched by more than 40 millions of americans - Elvis in his entire life will appear in only 2 televison specials (1968 and 1973)- Elvis in concert 1977 was only broadcasted after his death. So Peter Guralnick was right in his book "Last Train to Memphis"-after January 1957-Elvis last TV show before the army- it was "The end of Something" chapter.

Re: Elvis in the '60s

Fri Dec 21, 2012 7:26 pm

jurasic1968 wrote:I'm sorry but in the American Top 10 of the 1964-1968 years were not only British groups. I remember Roy Orbison who had many top ten hits during this period. So it wasn't impossible for Elvis to have some top 10 hits if he recorded some good music

Orbison's last hit was 1964's Pretty Woman. After that he fell into oblivion until 1988's You Got It.

Re: Elvis in the '60s

Fri Dec 21, 2012 9:03 pm

Who is the guy who sings Blue Suede Shoes, Mean Woman Blues and Crawfish on that Shindig episode? He is pretty damed good. On the other hand someone needs to put a gag on Ray Peterson, even though I really liked Tell Laura I Love Her when I as a kid.

Found out his name is Joey Cooper. He is impressive. Glen Campbell does a great job too. I did not know Delaney Bramlett started out there too!

Re: Elvis in the '60s

Fri Dec 21, 2012 9:58 pm

skatterbrane wrote:Who is the guy who sings Blue Suede Shoes, Mean Woman Blues and Crawfish on that Shindig episode? He is pretty damed good.


That's Joey Cooper. He was a talented singer and songwriter, including several he wrote with Elvis pal Red West. His biggest success was "I'm A Fool," a Red West co-write first placed with Ricky Nelson in 1964, then a Billboard US Pop #17 hit produced by Lee Hazelwood for Dino, Desi & Billy a year later.



650400_Reprise 0367_Dino Desi & Billy.JPG
Dino, Desi & Billy, "I'm A Fool," (Reprise 0367, April 1965)



Songs of Joey Cooper
http://www.geocities.jp/hideki_wtnb/joey-csongs.html



phpBB [video]


Joey Cooper, "Crawfish" ("Shindig!" ABC-TV, Wednesday, May 5, 1965)
Special program: "Songs associated with Elvis Presley"



Imagine if "Crawfish" had been part of a live Elvis set.

Damn!
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Re: Elvis in the '60s

Fri Dec 21, 2012 10:10 pm

Didn't this guy wrote along with Red West "If You Think I Don’t Need You" from "Viva Las Vegas"?

Re: Elvis in the '60s

Fri Dec 21, 2012 11:08 pm

JimmyCool wrote:Didn't this guy wrote along with Red West "If You Think I Don’t Need You" from "Viva Las Vegas"?


Yup.

Re: Elvis in the '60s

Sat Dec 22, 2012 12:53 am

skatterbrane wrote:But, for the most part, the studio recordings ranged from above average to outstanding in the 60s. The Lost Album and Tommorow Is A Long Time CDs are proof of that.


If he had only gone to the studio in 1965 and make himself a tremendous gift of recording what he loved to do. Only for the sake of: it pleases me.... Listen to the short 1964 sessions line up: it gives you a clue of how great it could have been.