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Re: From Elvis' Crates --> His Vinyl Is No Mystery!

Tue Dec 11, 2012 10:31 pm

Suds wrote:Thanks for posting the Johnny Adams track - that's a fine performance. I love discovering songs that most radio stations don't play or don't know about. That was a great listen.

You're welcome.

I am hoping that this topic might just become one of those where we share and explore the music that Elvis loved, and in so doing learn more about Presley's artistic inclinations and influences.

Re: From Elvis' Crates --> His Vinyl Is No Mystery!

Tue Dec 11, 2012 10:50 pm

A lot of guessing going on here.


What inspiration did Teddy Bears Picnic give Elvis . it's on the list.

Re: From Elvis' Crates --> His Vinyl Is No Mystery!

Wed Dec 12, 2012 12:25 am

KiwiAlan wrote:A lot of guessing going on here.


What inspiration did Teddy Bears Picnic give Elvis . it's on the list.

A lot of guesswork? Not really, and there's no guesswork involved below, just knowledge of popular music and Elvis' personal history.

"Teddy Bear's Picnic" is something Elvis probably got a lot of inspiration from after February 1, 1968.

Teddy Bears' Picnic
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teddy_Bears%27_Picnic#Recording_history

"Teddy Bear's Picnic" has been adored by children for years. Crosby's delightful recording has been reissued many times since its first release in 1950.


500902_Decca 88050_Crosby.JPG



Bing Crosby with Jud Conlon's Rhythmaires and Victor Young and his Orchestra
"The Teddy Bear's Picnic" (Decca Children's Series 88050, September 2, 1950)

Recorded on June 22, 1950 in Los Angeles, CA, flip-side was "Rudolph The Red-Nosed Reindeer," cut the same day
http://www.45cat.com/record/988050
http://www.jazzdiscography.com/Artists/Crosby/crosby1bDecca.html
"The Teddy Bear's Picnic" by Crosby is also included in the Various Artists, 5 LP set Playtime in Story and Song, MCA Special Products DL 734642, 1970
http://www.discogs.com/Various-Playtime-In-Story-And-Song/release/3060398


Wonder if Lisa remembers "Teddy Bears' Picnic"?
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Re: From Elvis' Crates --> His Vinyl Is No Mystery!

Fri Dec 14, 2012 5:26 am

Moving on from teddy bears ...

To date we've seen focus on eight singles Elvis owned and enjoyed -- and two LPs he might have owned and loved very, very much:

drjohncarpenter wrote:Impressions, "Amen" (ABC-Paramount ABC 10602, November 14, 1964)
Lead vocalist: Curtis Mayfield
Billboard US Pop #7, January 9, 1965, R&B #17 January 30, 1965




Dr. Feelgood and the Interns, "What's Up, Doc" (Okeh 7156, July 7, 1962)
Turned out the B-side, "Right String But The Wrong Yo-Yo," made Billboard US Pop #84 on August 4, 1962
Dr. Feelgood was a stage name for Piano Red, sax man Boots Randolph was a group member!
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Piano_Red
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boots_Randolph




The Blossoms, "You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feelin'" (Bell 750, April 1969)
Produced by Bill Medley, they provided the backing vocals on the Righteous Brothers 1965 hit.
Clip is from "Playboy After Dark," Hugh Hefner's second syndicated TV series, December 17, 1969.




Pat Boone, "I Almost Lost My Mind" (Dot 15472, May 12, 1956)
Billboard US Pop #1, July 28, 1956
The recording is a faithful cover of the 1950 R&B #1 by Hunter; are those the Jordanaires on backing vocals?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I_Almost_Lost_My_Mind
Allegedly, a 1960s home demo exists of Elvis giving this a try, would love to hear it.




Dane Stinit, "Don't Knock What You Don't Understand" (Sun 402, May 1966)
Dane issued two mid-sixties singles on Sun, then disappeared:
Sun 402 - Don't Knock What You Don't Understand / Always On The Go (May 1966)
Sun 405 - Sweet Country Girl / That Muddy Ole River (February 1967)




Johnny Adams, "Reconsider Me" (SSS International 770, June 7, 1969)
Billboard US Pop #28 and R&B #8 on August 2, 1969
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johnny_Adams




Cliff Gleaves, "Long Black Hearse" (Liberty 55263, July 5, 1960)
His debut single, a Billboard spotlight pick the same week as "It's Now or Never" (see below)



Bing Crosby with Jud Conlon's Rhythmaires and Victor Young and his Orchestra
"The Teddy Bear's Picnic" (Decca Children's Series 88050, September 2, 1950)

Recorded on June 22, 1950 in Los Angeles, CA, flip-side was "Rudolph The Red-Nosed Reindeer," cut the same day
http://www.45cat.com/record/988050
http://www.jazzdiscography.com/Artists/Crosby/crosby1bDecca.html
"The Teddy Bear's Picnic" by Crosby is also included in the Various Artists, 5 LP set Playtime in Story and Song, MCA Special Products DL 734642, 1970
http://www.discogs.com/Various-Playtime-In-Story-And-Song/release/3060398




Bob Dylan, Bringing It All Back Home (Columbia, CL 2328, April 17, 1965)
Billboard US Pop #6, October 9, 1965
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bringing_It_All_Back_Home


Bob Dylan, Highway 61 Revisited (Columbia CS 2389, August 14, 1965)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Highway_61_Revisited




Any thoughts? I was not too thrilled by Pat Boone's cover, but was most impressed by the Blossoms single. Of course, I adore Darlene Love. This is a cool topic -- I will dig out some more soon.


.

Re: From Elvis' Crates --> His Vinyl Is No Mystery!

Fri Dec 14, 2012 7:35 am

Johnny Adams cooks on Reconsider Me. Great recording.

I have a gut feeling that the Bing Crosby song might have been in the collection because of Gladys.

Re: From Elvis' Crates --> His Vinyl Is No Mystery!

Fri Dec 14, 2012 7:39 am

I don't know TJ. Elvis certainly recorded a good deal of songs associated with Crosby- "Beyond the Reef," "True Love," "Blue Hawaii" etc. He might have been a fan.

Re: From Elvis' Crates --> His Vinyl Is No Mystery!

Fri Dec 14, 2012 7:45 am

I'm sure that Elvis did enjoy Bing, but I could just imagine that particular recording ringing Gladys' bell more (a bit mumsy), particularly if it was picked up when first released. If a later release, the Lisa Marie tie-in is of course likely.

Re: From Elvis' Crates --> His Vinyl Is No Mystery!

Fri Dec 14, 2012 7:48 am

This item on the list had left me baffled and bewildered. I thought it was an error, something. Well, it IS on YouTube! I can't contemplate why he owned it, or anybody did . . . what?



rjm

Re: From Elvis' Crates --> His Vinyl Is No Mystery!

Fri Dec 14, 2012 7:56 am

We know Elvis liked Boone's ballad voice. Maybe he was intrigued to hear what Pat would do with a song he'd nailed so well himself.

Boone is very much covering the Wynonie Harris original though. There's no real trace of Elvis' classic rockabilly cut.

Re: From Elvis' Crates --> His Vinyl Is No Mystery!

Sat Dec 15, 2012 4:30 am

Just curious. Has a picture of Elvis' copy of Odetta Sings Dylan ever been published? I think it would make an important musical artifact. Apart from the fact that Elvis apparently loved it, it lead to Elvis' sublime version of "Tomorrow Is A Long Time".

Re: From Elvis' Crates --> His Vinyl Is No Mystery!

Tue Oct 06, 2015 3:14 pm

thanks for posting. I would have thought Dusty In Memphis would be in there.

Re: From Elvis' Crates --> His Vinyl Is No Mystery!

Tue Oct 06, 2015 9:59 pm

r&b wrote:thanks for posting. I would have thought Dusty In Memphis would be in there.


It was fun to put this together. As for the Dusty LP, maybe Charlie borrowed it, and never brought it back.

Re: From Elvis' Crates --> His Vinyl Is No Mystery!

Tue Oct 06, 2015 10:21 pm

drjohncarpenter wrote:
r&b wrote:thanks for posting. I would have thought Dusty In Memphis would be in there.


It was fun to put this together. As for the Dusty LP, maybe Charlie borrowed it, and never brought it back.


As a side note I did in another 'Ask Marty' if Elvis liked Dusty. He said he did. One would have thought so as he covered one of her biggest hits and she had that kind of pure soulful voice he enjoyed.

Re: From Elvis' Crates --> His Vinyl Is No Mystery!

Wed Oct 07, 2015 6:59 pm

As listed in the EIN 2004 article The Secrets of Elvis' record collection


Some of the highlights listed in the Record Collector article (there are many more) include:

Jingle Bells by Bing Crosby & The Andrews Sisters is the earliest released (1943) single in the collection
the collection includes significant numbers of R&B but remarkably few seminal rock & roll releases. The large catalog of artists included Johnny Ace, Ray Charles, Faye Adams, Joe Turner, Little Walter and Ivory Joe Hunter
similarly, 'white' gospel recordings are well represented by names such as The Blackwood's, the Speer Family, The Statesmen, the Higher Ground and the Brock Brothers, while 'black' gospel hardly gets a look in, with only a handful of singles and LPs by artists including the Soul Stirrers, Golden Gate Quartet and the Rance Allen Group
Ballad recordings by The Clovers, the Crickets, The Platters, the Spiders, the Dominoes, Pat Boone and Glenn Miller/The Ink Spots
The Country music genre is well represented through recordings by Jimmy Little, Bobbie Gentry, Eddy Arnold, Rita Coolidge, Jim Reeves and Ray Price
soul recordings by Smokey Robinson, Etta James, Sam Cooke, Clyde McPhatter and Ben E. King among many others
Orchestral records by the Boston Symphony Orchestra and the Chicago Symphony Orchestra
Choral recordings by the Bethany First Church of the Nazarene and the Mormon Tabernacle Choir
Movie themes by Leonard Bernstein, Marty Gold and the Manhattan Pops
Then contemporary rock sounds - The Allman Brothers Band , Free and Mott The Hoople records
Then contemorary pop sounds - Jose Feliciano, Nilsson, Gilbert O'Sullivan, Tom Jones, Englebert Humperdinck, Dionne Warwick and Anne Murray
Collection of speeches (In Search of Freedom) by Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King
Charles Boyer's LP of spoken love songs (Where Does Love Go)
The (symbolic single) I Can Make It With You by Jackie DeShannon
Several comedy albums including The First Family by Robert Kennedy impersonator, Vaughn Meader, and Laugh...Live from Jonathan Winters
Red West's acetate of If Everyday Was Like Christmas (a festive theme recurred throughout Elvis' large collection with dozens of yuletide season titles)
The list of artists Elvis listened to is particularly broad. Apart from those mentioned above, others signifying an interesting cross-section of the musical rainbow are: Marty Robbins, Frank Sinatra, Brownie McGee, the Sunshine Sisters, Mac Davis, Rex Allen Jr., the New York Philharmonic, J.J. Cale, Glen Campbell, Bobby Bare, Bonnie Guitar, Wanda Jackson, Brenda Lee, The Statesmen, Buck Owens, the North Cleveland Church of God, The Supremes, Jackie Wilson, Johnny Cash, Harry Belafonte, Dean Martin, Roy Hamilton, Adam Wade, Billy Vaughn, Della Reese, Jerry Lee Lewis, Eddie Fontaine, Cliff Richard and Carla Thomas.

Go here for more of the article.
Paul Simpson also supplied his views on Elvis' record collection (as shown above) for EIN at the time.
>>>
http://www.elvisinfonet.com/recordcollector.html

Cheers
Piers

Re: From Elvis' Crates --> His Vinyl Is No Mystery!

Wed Oct 07, 2015 7:28 pm

r&b wrote:
drjohncarpenter wrote:It was fun to put this together. As for the Dusty LP, maybe Charlie borrowed it, and never brought it back.


As a side note I did in another 'Ask Marty' if Elvis liked Dusty. He said he did. One would have thought so as he covered one of her biggest hits and she had that kind of pure soulful voice he enjoyed.


The second Elvis chose to cover Dusty's signature tune in 1970, there could be no question he admired her work. And I'll bet he loved how she wore her hair, too.


660000_Dusty Springfield.JPG
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Re: From Elvis' Crates --> His Vinyl Is No Mystery!

Wed Oct 07, 2015 8:11 pm

Even for Elvis, one hairstyle at a time was plenty. Dusty's got about half a dozen going on there. Nice sideburns though :lol:

Re: From Elvis' Crates --> His Vinyl Is No Mystery!

Thu Oct 08, 2015 4:02 pm

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