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The Beatles Live Project

Fri Nov 16, 2012 2:34 am

This looks interesting:

http://thebeatlesliveproject.com/

Wouldn't it be great if EPE & Sony could do something similar.

Re: The Beatles Live Project

Mon Nov 19, 2012 11:26 am

The clip was a bit over the top to my taste. Interesting to see what are they going to do with all the material. As much as I love the Beatles music, their live work during the Beatlemania years has never been a great interest to me. Usually the sq is of the recordings are poor and the live performances cannot really match the studio ones. To me they did their greatest work in the studio.

Re: The Beatles Live Project

Mon Nov 19, 2012 11:51 am

rockinrebel wrote:This looks interesting:

http://thebeatlesliveproject.com/

Wouldn't it be great if EPE & Sony could do something similar.

VERY interesting. At their best in concert, the Beatles were incredibly exciting to watch, and only in the last touring year (1966) does the standard drop enough to make the experience less enjoyable. And even then, they picked it up by the end of the final tour.


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Yes, if EPE, SONY and anyone else involved in Elvis' visual and audio rights could agree, a similar project might yield some amazing footage.

Re: The Beatles Live Project

Mon Nov 19, 2012 12:01 pm

Enjoy the complete 8-23-1964 Hollywood Bowl Concert in a SUPERB mono mix, courtesy of Dr. Ebbetts Sound System. The man is an audio genius.

The crowd is insane, the music is incredibly exciting, and a whole new world was opening up.

phpBB [video]


The Beatles - "Live At The Hollywood Bowl" (DESS 1964 Mono Acetate Mix)
01. 00:00 "Introduction / Twist and Shout"
02. 01:34 "You Can't Do That"
03. 04:30 "All My Loving"
04. 06:44 "She Loves You"
05. 09:13 "Things We Said Today"
06. 11:24 "Roll Over Beethoven"
07. 14:20 "Can't Buy Me Love"
08. 16:49 "If I Fell"
09. 18:58 "I Want to Hold Your Hand"
10. 21:49 "Boys"
11. 24:06 "A Hard Day's Night"
12. 27:20 "Long Tall Sally"

From: Doctor Ebbett's Sound System (DESS)... Enjoy!

The Beatles Live At the Hollywood Bowl (Project No. 4877)

On August 23, 1964, the Beatles played before more than 17,000 screaming fans at the Hollywood Bowl in Los Angeles, California. All 17,256 available tickets for the event held at the prestigious outdoor concert venue sold out in less than three hours when they had gone on sale four months earlier on April 25, 1964. Capitol recorded the performance with the intent of issuing a live album. The concert recording was produced by Capitol vice president Voyle Gilmore, with George Martin's assistance and Hugh Davis serving as engineer. Prior to the show, Billboard reported that Gilmore was hoping the open-air venue would allow the anticipated screaming to dissipate and not overshadow the band's sound. Yeah, right.

Neither George Martin nor EMI was enthusiastic about recording a live Beatles album. Martin stated that he "knew the quality of recording could not equal what we could do in the studio." Further complicating the recording of their outdoor performances was what Martin described as "arduous in the extreme" conditions for engineers and the chaos and panic that reigned at Beatles concerts. In addition, "the Beatles had no 'fold-back' speakers (monitors), so they could not hear what they were singing, and the eternal shriek from 17,000 healthy young lungs made even a jet plane sound inaudible." EMI was uninterested in releasing a live album as the company believed that sophisticated British consumers would not be interested in purchasing a collection of songs already available in better quality on studio albums and singles.

Capitol didn't share this view, knowing that Americans would eagerly buy a souvenir live album of a Beatles concert. Capitol had done quite well with live albums by the Kingston Trio (From the Hungry i on Capitol 1107 had reached number 2 in 1959 and College Concert on Capitol 1658 peaked at number 3 in 1962) and was set to release a Beach Boys album for the 1964 Christmas season. A Beatles album was a no-brainer as the disc was sure to be a chart topping million seller.

On August 27, 1964, Gilmore and Davis prepared stereo mixes from the three-track concert tape, which was edited by eliminating the time between the introduction of the band and the first song and by removing some of Paul's introductory comments to Ringo's rendition of "Boys." A mono Type-B acetate of the proposed album, with a total running time of less than thirty minutes, was cut on September 3, 1964.

Much to Capitol's horror and dismay, George Martin and the Beatles were dissatisfied with the group's performance and the sound quality of the recording. They blocked the release of the live album, disappointing Capitol's sales force and accountants. When the labels Beach Boys Concert (Capitol (S)TAO 2198) spent four weeks at number one on the Billboard top LP's chart in December, 1964, Capitol could only dream about what might have been.

The surviving mono acetate reveals that the Beatles were too hard on themselves. While John and Paul's vocals failed to match the perfection of their studio recordings (particularly on "If I Fell", "I Want to Hold Your Hand" and "A Hard Day's Night"), the energy of the performance and the excitement of the screaming crowd outweigh any deficiencies.

Capitol also recorded the group's August 29 and 30, 1965, concerts at the Hollywood Bowl hoping to issue a live album. Once again, the Beatles were not satisfied with the results and blocked the release of the album.

Perhaps motivated by the knowledge that the Beatles would not be completing a new album in time for the 1966 Christmas season, Capitol prepared stereo acetates of the 1964 concert on September 30, 1966 (Project No. 31-4877). Once again, the Beatles said, "NO."

Although Capitol's album of the 1964 concert was never officially released, the label did issue an album in 1977 containing performances from both the 1964 and 1965 Hollywood Bowl concerts. The Beatles At the Hollywood Bowl (Capitol SMAS-11638) contains the following songs from the 1964 show: "Things We Said Today", "Roll Over Beethoven", "Boys", "All My Loving", "She Loves You" and "Long Tall Sally". Volume 4 of the Anthology video contains black and white footage of the group performing "All My Loving."


Re: The Beatles Live Project

Mon Nov 19, 2012 10:07 pm

Thanks for the link.

It will be interesting to see what the live project unearths.

Re: The Beatles Live Project

Mon Nov 19, 2012 10:20 pm

drjohncarpenter wrote:Enjoy the complete 8-23-1964 Hollywood Bowl Concert in a SUPERB mono mix, courtesy of Dr. Ebbetts Sound System. The man is an audio genius.

The crowd is insane, the music is incredibly exciting, and a whole new world was opening up.

phpBB [video]


The Beatles - "Live At The Hollywood Bowl" (DESS 1964 Mono Acetate Mix)
01. 00:00 "Introduction / Twist and Shout"
02. 01:34 "You Can't Do That"
03. 04:30 "All My Loving"
04. 06:44 "She Loves You"
05. 09:13 "Things We Said Today"
06. 11:24 "Roll Over Beethoven"
07. 14:20 "Can't Buy Me Love"
08. 16:49 "If I Fell"
09. 18:58 "I Want to Hold Your Hand"
10. 21:49 "Boys"
11. 24:06 "A Hard Day's Night"
12. 27:20 "Long Tall Sally"

From: Doctor Ebbett's Sound System (DESS)... Enjoy!

The Beatles Live At the Hollywood Bowl (Project No. 4877)

On August 23, 1964, the Beatles played before more than 17,000 screaming fans at the Hollywood Bowl in Los Angeles, California. All 17,256 available tickets for the event held at the prestigious outdoor concert venue sold out in less than three hours when they had gone on sale four months earlier on April 25, 1964. Capitol recorded the performance with the intent of issuing a live album. The concert recording was produced by Capitol vice president Voyle Gilmore, with George Martin's assistance and Hugh Davis serving as engineer. Prior to the show, Billboard reported that Gilmore was hoping the open-air venue would allow the anticipated screaming to dissipate and not overshadow the band's sound. Yeah, right.

Neither George Martin nor EMI was enthusiastic about recording a live Beatles album. Martin stated that he "knew the quality of recording could not equal what we could do in the studio." Further complicating the recording of their outdoor performances was what Martin described as "arduous in the extreme" conditions for engineers and the chaos and panic that reigned at Beatles concerts. In addition, "the Beatles had no 'fold-back' speakers (monitors), so they could not hear what they were singing, and the eternal shriek from 17,000 healthy young lungs made even a jet plane sound inaudible." EMI was uninterested in releasing a live album as the company believed that sophisticated British consumers would not be interested in purchasing a collection of songs already available in better quality on studio albums and singles.

Capitol didn't share this view, knowing that Americans would eagerly buy a souvenir live album of a Beatles concert. Capitol had done quite well with live albums by the Kingston Trio (From the Hungry i on Capitol 1107 had reached number 2 in 1959 and College Concert on Capitol 1658 peaked at number 3 in 1962) and was set to release a Beach Boys album for the 1964 Christmas season. A Beatles album was a no-brainer as the disc was sure to be a chart topping million seller.

On August 27, 1964, Gilmore and Davis prepared stereo mixes from the three-track concert tape, which was edited by eliminating the time between the introduction of the band and the first song and by removing some of Paul's introductory comments to Ringo's rendition of "Boys." A mono Type-B acetate of the proposed album, with a total running time of less than thirty minutes, was cut on September 3, 1964.

Much to Capitol's horror and dismay, George Martin and the Beatles were dissatisfied with the group's performance and the sound quality of the recording. They blocked the release of the live album, disappointing Capitol's sales force and accountants. When the labels Beach Boys Concert (Capitol (S)TAO 2198) spent four weeks at number one on the Billboard top LP's chart in December, 1964, Capitol could only dream about what might have been.

The surviving mono acetate reveals that the Beatles were too hard on themselves. While John and Paul's vocals failed to match the perfection of their studio recordings (particularly on "If I Fell", "I Want to Hold Your Hand" and "A Hard Day's Night"), the energy of the performance and the excitement of the screaming crowd outweigh any deficiencies.

Capitol also recorded the group's August 29 and 30, 1965, concerts at the Hollywood Bowl hoping to issue a live album. Once again, the Beatles were not satisfied with the results and blocked the release of the album.

Perhaps motivated by the knowledge that the Beatles would not be completing a new album in time for the 1966 Christmas season, Capitol prepared stereo acetates of the 1964 concert on September 30, 1966 (Project No. 31-4877). Once again, the Beatles said, "NO."

Although Capitol's album of the 1964 concert was never officially released, the label did issue an album in 1977 containing performances from both the 1964 and 1965 Hollywood Bowl concerts. The Beatles At the Hollywood Bowl (Capitol SMAS-11638) contains the following songs from the 1964 show: "Things We Said Today", "Roll Over Beethoven", "Boys", "All My Loving", "She Loves You" and "Long Tall Sally". Volume 4 of the Anthology video contains black and white footage of the group performing "All My Loving."




Oh yes, Hollywood Bowl concerts are brilliant both in performances and sq.

Re: The Beatles Live Project

Tue Nov 20, 2012 12:08 pm

drjohncarpenter wrote:Enjoy the complete 8-23-1964 Hollywood Bowl Concert in a SUPERB mono mix, courtesy of Dr. Ebbetts Sound System. The man is an audio genius.

The crowd is insane, the music is incredibly exciting, and a whole new world was opening up.

phpBB [video]


The Beatles - "Live At The Hollywood Bowl" (DESS 1964 Mono Acetate Mix)
01. 00:00 "Introduction / Twist and Shout"
02. 01:34 "You Can't Do That"
03. 04:30 "All My Loving"
04. 06:44 "She Loves You"
05. 09:13 "Things We Said Today"
06. 11:24 "Roll Over Beethoven"
07. 14:20 "Can't Buy Me Love"
08. 16:49 "If I Fell"
09. 18:58 "I Want to Hold Your Hand"
10. 21:49 "Boys"
11. 24:06 "A Hard Day's Night"
12. 27:20 "Long Tall Sally"

From: Doctor Ebbett's Sound System (DESS)... Enjoy!

The Beatles Live At the Hollywood Bowl (Project No. 4877)

On August 23, 1964, the Beatles played before more than 17,000 screaming fans at the Hollywood Bowl in Los Angeles, California. All 17,256 available tickets for the event held at the prestigious outdoor concert venue sold out in less than three hours when they had gone on sale four months earlier on April 25, 1964. Capitol recorded the performance with the intent of issuing a live album. The concert recording was produced by Capitol vice president Voyle Gilmore, with George Martin's assistance and Hugh Davis serving as engineer. Prior to the show, Billboard reported that Gilmore was hoping the open-air venue would allow the anticipated screaming to dissipate and not overshadow the band's sound. Yeah, right.

Neither George Martin nor EMI was enthusiastic about recording a live Beatles album. Martin stated that he "knew the quality of recording could not equal what we could do in the studio." Further complicating the recording of their outdoor performances was what Martin described as "arduous in the extreme" conditions for engineers and the chaos and panic that reigned at Beatles concerts. In addition, "the Beatles had no 'fold-back' speakers (monitors), so they could not hear what they were singing, and the eternal shriek from 17,000 healthy young lungs made even a jet plane sound inaudible." EMI was uninterested in releasing a live album as the company believed that sophisticated British consumers would not be interested in purchasing a collection of songs already available in better quality on studio albums and singles.

Capitol didn't share this view, knowing that Americans would eagerly buy a souvenir live album of a Beatles concert. Capitol had done quite well with live albums by the Kingston Trio (From the Hungry i on Capitol 1107 had reached number 2 in 1959 and College Concert on Capitol 1658 peaked at number 3 in 1962) and was set to release a Beach Boys album for the 1964 Christmas season. A Beatles album was a no-brainer as the disc was sure to be a chart topping million seller.

On August 27, 1964, Gilmore and Davis prepared stereo mixes from the three-track concert tape, which was edited by eliminating the time between the introduction of the band and the first song and by removing some of Paul's introductory comments to Ringo's rendition of "Boys." A mono Type-B acetate of the proposed album, with a total running time of less than thirty minutes, was cut on September 3, 1964.

Much to Capitol's horror and dismay, George Martin and the Beatles were dissatisfied with the group's performance and the sound quality of the recording. They blocked the release of the live album, disappointing Capitol's sales force and accountants. When the labels Beach Boys Concert (Capitol (S)TAO 2198) spent four weeks at number one on the Billboard top LP's chart in December, 1964, Capitol could only dream about what might have been.

The surviving mono acetate reveals that the Beatles were too hard on themselves. While John and Paul's vocals failed to match the perfection of their studio recordings (particularly on "If I Fell", "I Want to Hold Your Hand" and "A Hard Day's Night"), the energy of the performance and the excitement of the screaming crowd outweigh any deficiencies.

Capitol also recorded the group's August 29 and 30, 1965, concerts at the Hollywood Bowl hoping to issue a live album. Once again, the Beatles were not satisfied with the results and blocked the release of the album.

Perhaps motivated by the knowledge that the Beatles would not be completing a new album in time for the 1966 Christmas season, Capitol prepared stereo acetates of the 1964 concert on September 30, 1966 (Project No. 31-4877). Once again, the Beatles said, "NO."

Although Capitol's album of the 1964 concert was never officially released, the label did issue an album in 1977 containing performances from both the 1964 and 1965 Hollywood Bowl concerts. The Beatles At the Hollywood Bowl (Capitol SMAS-11638) contains the following songs from the 1964 show: "Things We Said Today", "Roll Over Beethoven", "Boys", "All My Loving", "She Loves You" and "Long Tall Sally". Volume 4 of the Anthology video contains black and white footage of the group performing "All My Loving."



I have this CD Doc and yes you are right the sound is just awesome!!
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

Re: The Beatles Live Project

Wed Nov 21, 2012 2:27 am

Wowzers!

Re: The Beatles Live Project

Sun Nov 25, 2012 7:51 pm

STILL waiting for "Let it be" either on VHS, DVD or bluray! :x

Re: The Beatles Live Project

Mon Nov 26, 2012 12:08 am

Marko wrote:The clip was a bit over the top to my taste. Interesting to see what are they going to do with all the material. As much as I love the Beatles music, their live work during the Beatlemania years has never been a great interest to me. Usually the sq is of the recordings are poor and the live performances cannot really match the studio ones. To me they did their greatest work in the studio.


Yes you're right. The Beatles live stuff -for the most part - were sub-standard. These days I find myself only playing and listening to just their 1969 Rooftop concert.

Re: The Beatles Live Project

Fri Dec 07, 2012 10:07 am

Robt wrote:
Marko wrote:The clip was a bit over the top to my taste. Interesting to see what are they going to do with all the material. As much as I love the Beatles music, their live work during the Beatlemania years has never been a great interest to me. Usually the sq is of the recordings are poor and the live performances cannot really match the studio ones. To me they did their greatest work in the studio.


Yes you're right. The Beatles live stuff -for the most part - were sub-standard. These days I find myself only playing and listening to just their 1969 Rooftop concert.

Did you even listen to the 1964 concert I found on YouTube and posted above?

The Beatles made their name first as a LIVE act. And until the last year of touring in 1966, their shows were amazingly tight and exciting, despite many disadvantages (no monitors, screaming crowds, scant rehearsal time). Learn more about the group and you'll realize your view is more hyperbole than truth.

Re: The Beatles Live Project

Fri Dec 07, 2012 10:38 pm

drjohncarpenter wrote:
Robt wrote:
Marko wrote:The clip was a bit over the top to my taste. Interesting to see what are they going to do with all the material. As much as I love the Beatles music, their live work during the Beatlemania years has never been a great interest to me. Usually the sq is of the recordings are poor and the live performances cannot really match the studio ones. To me they did their greatest work in the studio.


Yes you're right. The Beatles live stuff -for the most part - were sub-standard. These days I find myself only playing and listening to just their 1969 Rooftop concert.

Did you even listen to the 1964 concert I found on YouTube and posted above?

The Beatles made their name first as a LIVE act. And until the last year of touring in 1966, their shows were amazingly tight and exciting, despite many disadvantages (no monitors, screaming crowds, scant rehearsal time). Learn more about the group and you'll realize your view is more hyperbole than truth.


I repeat. I find myself appreciating their Rooftop concert more so than the Hollywood Bowl gig. I just enjoy the unrehearsed and spontaneous feel about it.

Re: The Beatles Live Project

Fri Dec 07, 2012 10:49 pm

Hey Johnno. This one's a very good restoration and upload . Enjoy -

The Beatles Live in Melbourne, Wednesday 17 June 1964

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This was The Beatles' last of three consecutive nights of shows in the city's Festival Hall, Each night they gave two concerts, which were enjoyed by a total of 45,000 people.

Cameras from the Australian Channel 9 recorded the sixth and final show of the Melbourne leg of the world tour. It was screened on 1 July 1964 as an hour-long special, The Beatles Sing For Shell, named after the oil company which sponsored the broadcast.

Nine of The Beatles' Melbourne performances were included in the show: I Saw Her Standing There, You Can't Do That, All My Loving, She Loves You, Till There Was You, Roll Over Beethoven, Can't Buy Me Love, Twist And Shout and Long Tall Sally. During Long Tall Sally, a male audience member rushed onto the stage to shake John Lennon's hand.

The Beatles' manager Brian Epstein had initially agreed to allow Channel 9 to show just 12 minutes of the performance. However, after watching the recording an hour after the show he had a change of heart and increased the limit to 20 minutes.

In the end 22 minutes of The Beatles were included, the rest of the hour being footage of Australian and international performers. The only song from the set not broadcast was This Boy.

Re: The Beatles Live Project

Thu Dec 20, 2012 11:08 pm

Some of the best Beatles' live material are the recordings their made for BBC Radio...wonderful stuff full of rare covers.