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Tiger or Turkey

Poll ended at Fri Dec 21, 2012 2:17 am

Thanksgiving Tiger
27
40%
Thanksgiving Turkey
40
60%
 
Total votes : 67

Re: HARUM SCARUM - Rare Ads and Images

Wed Nov 28, 2012 11:39 am

Tornado! Spot on! Both HS and Frankie & Johnny came through on their DF releases as "normal" sounding soundtrack albums. I've stated before the same pity that Ernst didn't use those mixes for the Master's set.

Re: HARUM SCARUM - Rare Ads and Images

Wed Nov 28, 2012 2:15 pm

bajo wrote:Tornado! Spot on! Both HS and Frankie & Johnny came through on their DF releases as "normal" sounding soundtrack albums. I've stated before the same pity that Ernst didn't use those mixes for the Master's set.


I also agree that both soundtracks sounded better on the double features, Shake That Tambourine in particuler sounded far superiour. Obviously Ernst didn't use them as he wanted all the original mixes, as used in Elvis's lifetime. When I got the Complete Masters I very nearly got rid of the DF, pleased now that I didn't.

Re: HARUM SCARUM - Rare Ads and Images

Thu Nov 29, 2012 1:54 am

ELVIS PRESLEY stars in "Harum Scarum"
Screen Stories, December 1965
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Re: HARUM SCARUM - Rare Ads and Images

Thu Nov 29, 2012 2:29 am

Chris Roberts wrote:
bajo wrote:Tornado! Spot on! Both HS and Frankie & Johnny came through on their DF releases as "normal" sounding soundtrack albums. I've stated before the same pity that Ernst didn't use those mixes for the Master's set.


I also agree that both soundtracks sounded better on the double features, Shake That Tambourine in particuler sounded far superiour. Obviously Ernst didn't use them as he wanted all the original mixes, as used in Elvis's lifetime. When I got the Complete Masters I very nearly got rid of the DF, pleased now that I didn't.



I'm glad to know that I'm not the only one here. I advocate to Ernst again and again that he made the right decision on the DF but unfortunately he went back to the horrible original mixes for the Complete Master and even for the FTD version: a shame! Both F&J and H.S. are a much more pleasant hearing on the DF's version and by far. Since a long time, I take it that FTD and Sony should correct the RCA's "mistakes" of the past. There is something very conservative and even a bit fanatic in keeping the "ways" of yesterdays, especially when audiophiles obviously can see a difference, while the others don't give a damn. And by the way, we don't listen to music llke we used to do before. Do we tolerate the scratches todays like in the vinyl's days? Certainally not. Ernst did a good job also on the remake of Promised Land in 2000: a new mix and much more interesting, where you can hear each instruments instead of being scrambled in a mashed pudding. That's why, I love so much the 70's studio alternates. But when it comes to the masters, I tend to listen to the 2000 BMG release than the FTD's version. On the other hand, the alternates takes are a joy to listen to on the 3 Stax FTD releases, and one of the reason is that we can appreciate the contribution of each band member on a given song while on the master they are often drowned in the final mix. The finesse of a guitar lick, or the nuance of a bass, or a subtile drum pass are all so exquisitly clear on the outtakes segments of the FTD releases. The 70's masters box-set " Walk A Mile In My Shoes" presented the most beautiful mix of the June Marathon session of 1970. And I don't know about you but I always thought that the channels on the Memphis Record had a better balanced mix than any other official releases either from RCA, BMG, Sony or FTD. I dig the credendo on the electric guitar on the left channeld on the second segment of the song "Wearin' That Loved On Look" wich we loose on the recents mixes. And also Ernst did a marvelous job on the remixed version of "I'm Movin' On" track 4 of the 1999 double cd release of the Memphis sessions: " Suspicious Minds" He cleaned everything but left the magnificent play of John Hughey on steel guitar. What a trip! I flipped over it when I heard it for the first time and I still enjoy it as a highlight of the Memphis sessions today. Sadly, I'm afraid FTD will follow the scheme of the original mix for the album From Elvis In Memphis. As for Back In Memphis, coming in December, I wait for it with enthusiasm finally. I only wish he would venture sometimes in new territory and "bodly go where no one..."
Prince From Another Planet to me have marked an definitive improvement for MSG, compared with the ealier releases, The Complete Masters offfered also a very good sound and mix for the original MSG album too.
You can bet I kept the 1987 Memphis Record cd, the 1999 Suspicious Minds double cd, the 2000 Promised Land cd and of course the Double Features - the whole series: but the highlights and most precious of them is the Frankie And Johnny and Harum Scarum cds.

Re: HARUM SCARUM - Rare Ads and Images

Thu Nov 29, 2012 6:46 am

Tornado wrote:I'm glad to know that I'm not the only one here. I advocate to Ernst again and again that he made the right decision on the DF but unfortunately he went back to the horrible original mixes for the Complete Master and even for the FTD version: a shame! Both F&J and H.S. are a much more pleasant hearing on the DF's version and by far. Since a long time, I take it that FTD and Sony should correct the RCA's "mistakes" of the past. There is something very conservative and even a bit fanatic in keeping the "ways" of yesterdays, especially when audiophiles obviously can see a difference, while the others don't give a damn. And by the way, we don't listen to music llke we used to do before. Do we tolerate the scratches todays like in the vinyl's days? Certainally not. Ernst did a good job also on the remake of Promised Land in 2000: a new mix and much more interesting, where you can hear each instruments instead of being scrambled in a mashed pudding. That's why, I love so much the 70's studio alternates. But when it comes to the masters, I tend to listen to the 2000 BMG release than the FTD's version. On the other hand, the alternates takes are a joy to listen to on the 3 Stax FTD releases, and one of the reason is that we can appreciate the contribution of each band member on a given song while on the master they are often drowned in the final mix. The finesse of a guitar lick, or the nuance of a bass, or a subtile drum pass are all so exquisitly clear on the outtakes segments of the FTD releases. The 70's masters box-set " Walk A Mile In My Shoes" presented the most beautiful mix of the June Marathon session of 1970. And I don't know about you but I always thought that the channels on the Memphis Record had a better balanced mix than any other official releases either from RCA, BMG, Sony or FTD. I dig the credendo on the electric guitar on the left channeld on the second segment of the song "Wearin' That Loved On Look" wich we loose on the recents mixes. And also Ernst did a marvelous job on the remixed version of "I'm Movin' On" track 4 of the 1999 double cd release of the Memphis sessions: " Suspicious Minds" He cleaned everything but left the magnificent play of John Hughey on steel guitar. What a trip! I flipped over it when I heard it for the first time and I still enjoy it as a highlight of the Memphis sessions today. Sadly, I'm afraid FTD will follow the scheme of the original mix for the album From Elvis In Memphis. As for Back In Memphis, coming in December, I wait for it with enthusiasm finally. I only wish he would venture sometimes in new territory and "bodly go where no one..."
Prince From Another Planet to me have marked an definitive improvement for MSG, compared with the ealier releases, The Complete Masters offfered also a very good sound and mix for the original MSG album too.
You can bet I kept the 1987 Memphis Record cd, the 1999 Suspicious Minds double cd, the 2000 Promised Land cd and of course the Double Features - the whole series: but the highlights and most precious of them is the Frankie And Johnny and Harum Scarum cds.

Great post, Tornado! And I wholeheartedly agree with you.

Re: HARUM SCARUM - Rare Ads and Images

Sat Dec 01, 2012 2:02 am

Hey friends! Could anyone help me in this information, please?
What's the name of that child actress who co this film with Elvis and dance to the song "Hey Little Girl"? ::rocks
Thank you for these wonderful pics... :smt006

Re: HARUM SCARUM - Rare Ads and Images

Sat Dec 01, 2012 8:11 am

Vicki Malkin played Sari...except for this film her film credits are pretty much restricted to U.S. television episodes. None after 1967/68 I believe.

Re: HARUM SCARUM - Rare Ads and Images

Tue Dec 04, 2012 12:28 am

Greybeard wrote:Vicki Malkin played Sari...except for this film her film credits are pretty much restricted to U.S. television episodes. None after 1967/68 I believe.


Oh thank you very much for these information my friend Greybeard... hugs ::rocks

Re: HARUM SCARUM

Sat Dec 08, 2012 11:08 pm

All "trivial" images have been removed so as not to offend "Dr. John Carpenter."

Re: HARUM SCARUM

Thu Dec 20, 2012 6:18 am

Just a few hours left to cast your vote. Is Harum Scarum a turkey or a tiger?

To get you in the mood, here's a review of the FTD release sent to me. I believe it's by someone named Johnny Salovich.

Harum Scarum is housed in handsome, double fold out, 7' sleeves with full color information booklets, a 'retro' design and more than a dozen outtakes each, these gorgeous packages are a real treat for the hardcore Elvis fanatic. The fidelity throughout is also remarkably clean. There's an old song about finding 'where the sands turnin' into gold' - and that is exactly what these 'bonus' Follow That Dream soundtrack discs achieve.

That said, 'Harum Scarum' is a tough listen for anyone who cares about Elvis Presley as a significant recording artist. The LP, issued near Christmas 1965, may be the very first without one single worthwhile track.

And despite being recorded in the cosy confines of Nashville's 'Studio B', there is nothing to suggest the atmosphere of the great recordings done just a few years earlier. Presley's vocals are way up in the mix, while his rhythm section seems to be in another room entirely! In the eight months since Elvis' last studio session, the pop landscape has changed, and the low standard of song craft is certainly not missed by Elvis. The February 1965 soundtrack sessions for 'Harum Scarum' are taped in the midst of rampant Beatlemania. At the same time as the Beatles are creating classics for 'Help', their second film, Presley slaves to breathe life into faux rock tunes like Hey Little Girl or lame Middle Eastern pastiches such as Golden Coins. On Elvis' pop radio that month gorgeous numbers like the Temptations My Girl or the Righteous Brothers' You've Lost That Lovin' Feelin' top the charts, and it must've cut to the bone working on garbage like Shake That Tambourine.

Maybe he knows. Elvis fails to complete several vocals during these sessions, and almost half the released album features 'cut and splice' vocal masters. On the third day Elvis tries Harem Holiday twice and splits -- these previously-unreleased takes find his voice still sounding excellent, but the man is uninspired.

Clearly, those assembled understand this is a job, not art. Still, even a factory job has its lighter moments. Responding to a question regarding tempo at the end of an outtake of Animal Instinct, Elvis jokes that 'there's a couple of places, I can't find it. But I'm looking'. Another funny bit comes when Presley misreads a lyric of Shake That Tambourine, which the group ultimately runs down after thirty-eight takes. 'Teenie' feet, man I can't believe I said that!' exclaims Elvis, breaking up as only he can.

Roger Semon's role in locating a project's original photographic negatives is one of the highlights of this release, right down to the beautiful -- and corrected -- original LP cover image. The MGM film may be low budget, producer Sam Katzman was well-known as 'King of the Quickies', but Elvis looks like a million bucks! Another interesting aspect to this deluxe FTD package is the booklet's new information on material submitted by Presley's publishing company. Many substandard tunes offered and rejected for 'Harum Scarum' would reappear on later movie projects! No wonder Elvis felt like giving up, his own publisher didn't care enough to scout around for quality material. Regretfully, Elvis will cut worse material in Hollywood, but 'Harum Scarum' immediately lowered the bar in a banner year of pop music. Down, but not out, Elvis would salvage his integrity with gospel recordings the following year, and his 1968 TV Special would prove the talent never left.


Last edited by HoneyTalkNelson on Thu Dec 20, 2012 6:49 am, edited 1 time in total.

Re: HARUM SCARUM

Thu Dec 20, 2012 6:24 am

Here is the ad that started all the controversy.
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Re: Harum Scarum: Thanksgiving Tiger or Turkey? Cast your vo

Thu Dec 20, 2012 6:17 pm

londonflash wrote:Cool post!

Harum or Harem?


It's 'Harum Scarum' but 'Harem Holiday' !

Strangely, the two words, one with a 'u' and one with an 'e', are nothing to do with each other in meaning !

Re: HARUM SCARUM

Thu Dec 20, 2012 8:00 pm

I never liked the movie...saw part on tv years ago and couldn't finish watching it....but i do like the soundtrack!!
This happens to me with many others...don't like the movies but yes many of the songs on them :wink:

Re: HARUM SCARUM

Tue Jan 01, 2013 5:27 pm

Since it is January 1, 2013, I'd like to point out that on this New Years day, January 1, 1966, Elvis Presley's, "Harem Scarum" soundtrack Lp was peaking at the #8 spot on the Billboard Top Lp's chart, up from position #10 in it's 8th week.