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Elvis in the '60s

Wed Nov 28, 2012 4:24 am

How do you feel about Elvis career trajectory between '61 and '68? I mean the fact that his career was pretty much centered around the films and their soundtracks? Do you think he could've been as popular in the '60s as he was in the '50s?
How would do you think he would have fared if he had still been an active, competitive recording artist when the "British Invasion" hit and Psychedelia began? Do you think Elvis would've flirted with Psychedelic rock had he been making non-soundtrack records in '65-'67? One wonders if The Beatles and thus the hundreds of subsequent acts would've become AS POPULAR as they did if Elvis had been around...They IMO filled a void. I'm not saying they became famous because only because of that but I believe it was a factor in them becoming as big as hey did.

I wonder how his life, career and legacy would've been effected if he had kept playing live shows and not done any movies in the '60s...Yes he did plenty of songs via the movies but it doesn't seem to be music he really wanted to play and as such it makes it seem like just sadly wasted time.

Re: Elvis in the '60s

Wed Nov 28, 2012 5:54 am

The British invasion would have happened regardless of what Elvis was doing and all those acts would've been just as popular as they were.

It's hard to say what style of music Elvis would have done if he had not been concentrating on the movies.

He could have done adult contemporary, folk, blues, R&B or he could have gotten songs from the non performing songwriters of that period such as Goffin & King.

Not recording the soundtrack junk and recording better material in their place would've made Elvis legacy as a recording artist a little better.

Elvis could have recorded psycheldilac music if he wanted but i think he would have rather done ballads instead.

Elvis never struck me as a person that liked that kinda music.

Re: Elvis in the '60s

Wed Nov 28, 2012 5:59 am

This is a common myth but I don't necessarily buy into it. One of the reasons Elvis survived was developing sort of an alternative fan base that was less fickle than the youth audience, but also of course his legions. It may have been he did as well as he could have done. It's important to remember that Elvis was 30-years-old in 1965 and had been on the scene almost a decade. If he was not your father's idol, he was certainly your big brother's. The 60's, from a commercial perspective, were not open to everyone. The Everlys, who followed nearly every trend there was in the 1960s and played with the British Invasion rockers themselves, did so to little or no success in their home country. Chuck Berry had a great year in 1964 and then vanished into oblivion. There was limited tolerance in the new youth audience for '50s icons. Elvis could have satisfied his loyal fan base with better recordings, but in terms of a competition for the youth audience with the Beatles I don't think that was happening.

Re: Elvis in the '60s

Wed Nov 28, 2012 6:03 am

I don't know who was buying Elvis' records in 1964 and 1965 but he was doing pretty well scoring a string of top 20 hits.

I figure with more contemporary material he would have had some top ten hits in that period.

Re: Elvis in the '60s

Wed Nov 28, 2012 7:13 am

There were his built in legions, and I think the easy listening audience for which he ironically became kind of a standard bearer. All during this period, Elvis' biggest hits were with ballads. I think it's telling that the singles from Tickle Me were "(Such an) Easy Question" and "I'm Yours" (perhaps the most old fashioned ballad Elvis ever sang) rather than "Slowly But Surely."

Re: Elvis in the '60s

Wed Nov 28, 2012 8:10 am

Elvis definitely could have been more of a force to reckon with if he had good material imo. Elvis was at an absolute vocal peak when he returned from the Army and didn't get the chance to see his true potential throughout the 60's. By the time Clambake was released in Oct. of '67... record stores and DJs had little to no interest playing Elvis's latest single and album. And if Elvis did get some good quality songs to record... "Guitar Man" and "Big Boss Man" they were buried as bonus songs and didn't get the airplay they deserved.

Re: Elvis in the '60s

Wed Nov 28, 2012 10:15 am

I wonder how Elvis' career would've went if he had continued writing songs, as he had with You'll Be Gone and That's Someone You Never Forget.*

I think those were actually really good songs.


*= I've read that those two songs were the only two ever written by Elvis, but I don't know how much of them was written by him. The whole songs? The words? The music? Just the titles?

Re: Elvis in the '60s

Wed Nov 28, 2012 10:28 am

Errol Flynn wrote:I wonder how Elvis' career would've went if he had continued writing songs, as he had with You'll Be Gone and That's Someone You Never Forget.*

I think those were actually really good songs.


*= I've read that those two songs were the only two ever written by Elvis, but I don't know how much of them was written by him. The whole songs? The words? The music? Just the titles?

he probably hummed a bit or added a lala here or there and took the credit for the song, or part of it

Re: Elvis in the '60s

Wed Nov 28, 2012 10:43 am

There are more ways to see it. Some have already mentioned The Everlys and Chuck Berry. Overall, most of the 50's and early 60's artists faded along with the British invation.
Cliff Richard were among the few who managed to stay afloat. But, he was British and in a class of his own, and still is! As for Elvis he managed to be included with a #1 hit even in 1965. But, from then on it was downhill, hit-wise. Include the dreadful HS and PSH movies and we felt as beeing on another planet.
If it wasn't for the 3 movies a year including soundtracks, things might have been different. Still, every artist have their ups and downs. What counts these days is the legacy and the historic impact Elvis had. It's all in the history now, nothing to be done about. I, for one, concentrate on the fact that beeing an Elvis fan today is better than it ever was. All those wonderful FTD's and Legacy releases still coming out makes it all worthwhile.
I still think that the wonderful Masters boxes tells the story of Elvis' recording legacy in a very good way. Pity they didn't include the new masters when they shuffled those out the second time around!

Re: Elvis in the '60s

Wed Nov 28, 2012 10:44 am

Not everyone was into that "psychedelia" business. There were worlds of music that Elvis missed during this time, some of them VERY close to home.

Particularly soul. Memphis soul. STAX. And Chips Moman started working on very interesting things much earlier than than '68 or '69. Elvis missed out on his "own" music, doing that movie nonsense. And it's very unfortunate. He didn't need to compete on anyone else's turf at the time, because interesting music was happening right in his own backyard. He just didn't get involved. We can't know what he was thinking - if he saw music as a competition for chart space, rather than as simply music, which he'd always loved. Was it only about screaming teens and gold records? Or was there a deeper connection to music? I'd like to think the latter, but his retreat is telling.

You know, when the Beatles' left the road in '66, it was because they wanted to do more interesting (to them) music. They'd had enough of the whole "Elvis Trip." I guess Elvis hadn't had enough. I can't say. But when you make music that is fulfilling to YOU, it tends to do well, and be loved by others. Not always, but it often works out that way.

One mid-sixties film, Tickle Me, didn't even have hardly any new music at all. It took a lot of tracks from the very early '60s, and used them. They were better than his current stuff, but it sounded a bit strange because his voice was in a different place by then. In '65, he never entered a studio to do any "regular" non-movie stuff. And most of '64, too. He just went away.

I think he would have done just fine, by NOT "competing" but by doing music that was always close to him, anyway. At least in '66, he did some interesting things, especially the gospel album, which won a Grammy.

"Wasted years, wasted years, oh how foolish."

rjm
P.S. -- He did the title/chorus of "That's Someone You('ll) Never Forget," plus the ghostly arrangement of the voices, which makes the song. He was clearly thinking of his mother -- that's really not in dispute. As to "You'll Be Gone," there have been several versions of how that came about. Doesn't matter; he never really followed up, and it sounds like "Begin The Beguine" anyway, which was his original intention - to add new lyrics to it. Thematically, it is kind of an odd song. But he had always altered songs significantly, when he felt like it, from the early "My Baby's Gone" through the years. The first verse of "Blue Moon of Kentucky" is original, as are various verses. Sometimes he didn't do that at all, but when he did, he could do more with a single line, or even phrase, than most with a whole song. He is the sole writer of an instrumental jam called "I Didn't Make It On Playin' Guitar." I like it. But oddly, since it was released posthumously, it's in something called "Copyright Control." Not BMI. That leaves me puzzled. Copyright Control exists to protect writers who are not otherwise protected. Very odd.

And then there's his . . . should I? Yeah, it's ok. He reworked "Stranger In My Own Hometown" in 1970, with a new verse, and part of another. It's X-rated, but definitely has socially redeeming value! (Look it up on YouTube.)

And there's. No. Requires too much background info. Forget it. Just forget it. All he sang on an ancient country song, was "lala." :mrgreen: Don't even think about it. Really, DON'T! (I understand, Ken, why you chose the better part of valor! ;) )

Re: Elvis in the '60s

Wed Nov 28, 2012 11:00 am

Elvis' contribution to "That's Someone You'll Never Forget" was the title, a direct suggestion to Red West and as much of a contribution as Doc Pomus made to "Young Blood." As RJM noted, his contribution to "You'll Be Gone" was part of the lyrics written in collaboration with Red West based on the melody of Cole Porter's "Begin the Beguine." When Porter declined permission to alter his song, Charlie Hodge came up with a new melody based loosely on Porter's melody. It was a legitimate credit. It is notable that Elvis allowed his name on the credit. He did not do so on any songs after the 1950s even the ones West wrote where he could have used some muscle to gain a credit from his friend. He must have been satisfied with the legitimacy of his contribution to these songs.

Neither of these songs were particularly commercial, though, which is an important factor in choosing singles. Both made it as B-sides years later and basically did not attract much attention, although "That's Someone You'll Never Forget" has acquired a much deserved cult reputation as it is a deeply felt performance.

As for Elvis trading blows with the Beatles, I think the fate of Elvis' contemporaries points the way things may have worked out. Virtually none of them had continued popular success after 1964. Hell Fats couldn't break past #100 with a friggin' Beatles' song and a damn great version of a Beatles' song at that. Elvis wouldn't have suffered as much as his contemporaries because of the Elvis legion of fans, but there's not a lot of evidence that recording in the then contemporary style would have yielded better results commercially than we saw. Again it would have made better listening for us than "Harem Holiday" but I don't know if it would have lit up the charts.

RJM Elvis did indeed make music that was fulfilling to him in this period. Some of it was squandered as album tracks or B-sides like "Memphis" and "It Hurts Me." However, and this is extremely important to note, relatively little of it broke outside the Elvis cult. How Great Thou Art was a fine word of mouth hit, but it was mostly amongst the faithful. A stunning re-imagination of Jimmy Reed's "Big Boss Man" couldn't break past the bottom of the Top 40. The extremely gritty and personal "Guitar Man" didn't even make Top 40 nor did the lovely remake of "You Don't Know Me" which graced the back side of "Big Boss Man." If the audience was so attuned to quality these would have been great hits. I don't buy the line that Elvis' rep was ruined so nobody listened. Who was listening to Dion in 1968 before "Abraham, Martin and John" and more importantly who listened after even though he made some very damn fine records? The truth is that the top of the charts and quality only have a passing acquaintance.

I don't get complaining about Elvis missing out on Memphis style soul when he caught up with FEIM. You got it. Does he have to hop every trend and make a great record in that style in that moment. It's like Elvis cannot a break any lapse in quality seems an unforgivable lack of will. Artists burn out and need time to relight their fuses. The way Elvis burned out was focusing on movies. I don't know why this is such a radical idea.

And it's important to note again the '60s audience was most definitely not open to anyone who experimented or did good work in the contemporary style. Ask the Everly Brothers who knew nothing but failure chasing these current trends. Ask the Beach Boys whose work after Pet Sounds, which contained three hit singles, tanked unless of course the Boys reverted to straight up love songs like "Darlin'" or beach tunes like "Do it Again." Ask the Four Seasons who were treated like poseurs for their exploration of psychedelia.

Re: Elvis in the '60s

Wed Nov 28, 2012 11:15 am

I take your points.

But as for soul, it was what he did, and who he was. From before the beginning. Gospel mixed with country lyricism, with an edge of R&B. He did catch the tail end of it, and no one could argue with the spectacular results, but there were several years where he could have enjoyed the local soul scene, I think. He made it clear, later, that he was not happy in Hollywood, least of all with the music.

And there was this wellspring of music right at home, that was mother's milk to him. But I guess artists do need to back off sometimes, I guess. And he had an excuse to do so. It's just that the peak of that music didn't last all that long, and it's a shame he didn't get involved in more of it, during that time. Because that time wouldn't come again. I agree he did catch it, but I think he would have been happier in the local soul scene than with what he was, or wasn't doing. Judgement call. I mean, he DID make music during this time: in private. And it was good. It was always playing guitar, piano, jamming . . . the dressing room sessions were an accident that Binder happened to see. They'd been doing this for years.

rjm

Re: Elvis in the '60s

Wed Nov 28, 2012 7:58 pm

rjm You sum it up quite well.

Elvis Is Back sessions represents a peak in Elvis' career, when his maturity and confidence led to a control and focus in his music. Elvis' choice of music suited him very well. Instead of following up with a tour throughout US and then possibly a world-tour, Elvis appeared on Sinatra's Welcome Home Elvis Special. Elvis was paid $125,000 for a total of six minutes on the air and unfortunately, this set the mold with Parker for things to come. Within a few years, Elvis would find himself trapped recording songs he had no interest but had to record specifically for his movies. '68 Special brought Elvis back into the spotlight and led to The American Sound Studios Sessions in '69. Elvis was hungry with the desire to make good music. Elvis would make a sustained effort to re-establish his musical dominance. Elvis recorded what he wanted to record, took control and focus in his music at home in Memphis, Tennessee. The results were phenomenal!

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Re: Elvis in the '60s

Wed Nov 28, 2012 9:31 pm

likethebike wrote:I don't get complaining about Elvis missing out on Memphis style soul when he caught up with FEIM. You got it. Does he have to hop every trend and make a great record in that style in that moment. It's like Elvis cannot a break any lapse in quality seems an unforgivable lack of will. Artists burn out and need time to relight their fuses. The way Elvis burned out was focusing on movies. I don't know why this is such a radical idea.


Errol Flynn did ask what style of music could Elvis have done or should have done.

It's just that it would have been cool for Elvis to record at Stax during the 60's with Booker T. and the Mg's.

It would have been cool for Elvis to record at Fame studios in Alabama with Rick Hall.

Elvis fans wanted more quality material than what we got during the 1960s.

If Elvis recorded for Atlantic records instead of RCA he likely would have recorded at Stax and Fame during the 1960s.

Re: Elvis in the '60s

Wed Nov 28, 2012 11:29 pm

Elvis' peak actually lasted a very long time for a contemporary pop singer. Commercially and artistically, artists generally last between one and seven years at their opening peak. Elvis by most accounts was at a peak at least into 1961/1962. That's a very long time by pop standards. Dylan burned out after a similar amount of time. The Beatles were no more after eight years. James Brown lasted a very long time but his was a more sporadic peak than Elvis'. After seven years, Ricky Nelson was pretty directionless as well. The Beach Boys were never quite the same again after Pet Sounds. Sure Brian Wilson's mental condition had a lot to do with it, but that mental condition had a lot to do with the pressures of trying to maintain a very high level of creativity. To ask an artist to maintain consistent creativity over a period of ten years or more is asking a lot. Even Michael Jackson, who recorded far less than Elvis, lasted eight years at the top. Although 1991's Dangerous has its defenders and its moments, few rank it with the tri-fecta of Off the Wall, Thriller and Bad. And even Bad is a noticeable drop from Thriller. An act as extremely gifted as the Band found consistent greatness only on the Basement tapes with Dylan and their own first two albums. I just don't know if Elvis had it in him, to keep hitting homeruns in the mid-60s. It's sad that he didn't keep swinging often enough. A track like "I Love Only One Girl" doesn't even try to be a single (a baseball not pop reference). Still, I don't know what he would have had during these years.

Re: Elvis in the '60s

Wed Nov 28, 2012 11:48 pm

likethebike wrote:Elvis' peak actually lasted a very long time for a contemporary pop singer. Commercially and artistically, artists generally last between one and seven years at their opening peak. Elvis by most accounts was at a peak at least into 1961/1962. That's a very long time by pop standards. Dylan burned out after a similar amount of time. The Beatles were no more after eight years. James Brown lasted a very long time but his was a more sporadic peak than Elvis'. After seven years, Ricky Nelson was pretty directionless as well. The Beach Boys were never quite the same again after Pet Sounds. Sure Brian Wilson's mental condition had a lot to do with it, but that mental condition had a lot to do with the pressures of trying to maintain a very high level of creativity. To ask an artist to maintain consistent creativity over a period of ten years or more is asking a lot. Even Michael Jackson, who recorded far less than Elvis, lasted eight years at the top. Although 1991's Dangerous has its defenders and its moments, few rank it with the tri-fecta of Off the Wall, Thriller and Bad. And even Bad is a noticeable drop from Thriller. An act as extremely gifted as the Band found consistent greatness only on the Basement tapes with Dylan and their own first two albums. I just don't know if Elvis had it in him, to keep hitting homeruns in the mid-60s. It's sad that he didn't keep swinging often enough. A track like "I Love Only One Girl" doesn't even try to be a single (a baseball not pop reference). Still, I don't know what he would have had during these years.

Another excuse-laden post complete with career mischaracterizations of Dylan and the Beatles.

It remains odd you never acknowledge the fact that the main reason Elvis disappeared in the 1960s is because he stopped trying as an artist? Forget the cultural changes, new groups or technological breakthroughs, Elvis Presley gave up his talent to make substandard movie musicals for the better part of the decade.

That's it.

Re: Elvis in the '60s

Thu Nov 29, 2012 12:40 am

I love almost all his Nashville stuff from 1960 to '68, the Studio B sound is great so perfectly mixed and bounced. IMO that material added quality to his music and legacy from the 60's, maybe you don't have a lot of R&R like the 50's but this also shows how his musical inquires and tastes were changing, he was maturing as a singer and wanted to try other kind of songs without leaving aside his original roots.
I think this material was more recognized over the years, even Rober Plant once talked about it saying how good they sound and their importance.
In my case, I put them the same level as his 50's recordings , maybe they don't have the impact the older ones had but still very unique and important, specially for their sound, the musicians, Elvis voice and the Jordanaires best work for sure.

Re: Elvis in the '60s

Thu Nov 29, 2012 12:54 am

ale wrote:I love almost all his Nashville stuff from 1960 to '68, the Studio B sound is great so perfectly mixed and bounced.

Unfortunately, Elvis abandoned Nashville's Studio B after May 28, 1963, with only five (5) primarily studio sessions for the last six and a half years of the decade, one of which was almost exclusively gospel music.

January 12, 1964 - 3 songs only
May 26-28, 1966
June 12, 1966 - 3 vocal overdubs only
September 10-12, 1967
January 15-17, 1968 - 2 studio songs only


Again, the man abandoned his art, his craft, and some might argue, his soul.

ale wrote:In my case, I put them the same level as his 50's recordings ...

Wow, that's a true corner-case view.

Re: Elvis in the '60s

Thu Nov 29, 2012 1:01 am

It is my believe that by 1963/4 the time was just right for a new musical explosion, my friends, who weren't bought up on rock'n'roll, were certainly ready for it, together with all the millions of their fellow baby boomers. The only american artist who kept performing well, in Britain, during the mid '60's was Roy Orbison who often appeared on the same shows as the Beatles etc..

If Elvis had, as I hoped at the time, become more contempary, I don't in all honesty think it would have helped. In fact as he didn't even try, and disapeared into his own film musical shell, it may even have helped in the long run making him more of an enigma. I would listen to a track from his latest album such as 'Queenie Wahine's P apaya' and mourn the passing of tracks such as 'Reconsider Baby' but still stuck with him as I felt "surely he would soon return to form". It did seem never ending though with the only big bright spot being the 'How Great Thou Art' album.

Now in retrospect, it would be good for his legacy if the mid 60's had been full of great recordings and none of those soundtracks, but as I say, at the time, I don't think it would have made that much of a difference. The world was just ready for something new.

Re: Elvis in the '60s

Thu Nov 29, 2012 1:46 am

Chris Roberts wrote:It is my believe that by 1963/4 the time was just right for a new musical explosion, my friends, who weren't bought up on rock'n'roll, were certainly ready for it, together with all the millions of their fellow baby boomers. The only american artist who kept performing well, in Britain, during the mid '60's was Roy Orbison who often appeared on the same shows as the Beatles etc..

If Elvis had, as I hoped at the time, become more contempary, I don't in all honesty think it would have helped. In fact as he didn't even try, and disapeared into his own film musical shell, it may even have helped in the long run making him more of an enigma.

Helped? That is a stretch.

Elvis didn't have to become more contemporary. He just needed to apply himself to his art.

If the public turned away, which I strongly doubt would have been the case, his true fan base would have been very proud of his commitment. One cannot overlook the fact that Roustabout hit #1 almost a year after the Beatles exploded in the United States. This indicated fans were desperate for Elvis Presley to get down and get with it, and were not ready to abandon him.

But then came his 1965 and 1966 releases.

Re: Elvis in the '60s

Thu Nov 29, 2012 2:20 am

drjohncarpenter wrote:
Chris Roberts wrote:It is my believe that by 1963/4 the time was just right for a new musical explosion, my friends, who weren't bought up on rock'n'roll, were certainly ready for it, together with all the millions of their fellow baby boomers. The only american artist who kept performing well, in Britain, during the mid '60's was Roy Orbison who often appeared on the same shows as the Beatles etc..

If Elvis had, as I hoped at the time, become more contempary, I don't in all honesty think it would have helped. In fact as he didn't even try, and disapeared into his own film musical shell, it may even have helped in the long run making him more of an enigma.

Helped? That is a stretch.

Elvis didn't have to become more contemporary. He just needed to apply himself to his art.

If the public turned away, which I strongly doubt would have been the case, his true fan base would have been very proud of his commitment. One cannot overlook the fact that Roustabout hit #1 almost a year after the Beatles exploded in the United States. This indicated fans were desperate for Elvis Presley to get down and get with it, and were not ready to abandon him.

But then came his 1965 and 1966 releases.


I think that is what I said, I was very desperate for Elvis "To get down and get with it" and "Apply himself to his art". Most people including the D.J's would definatly have been behind him in this and, us contemporary fans, wouldn't have been rediculed in the way we were for sticking with him.
Last edited by Chris Roberts on Thu Nov 29, 2012 7:43 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Re: Elvis in the '60s

Thu Nov 29, 2012 2:38 am

All very good points. To be honest the major reason Elvis had the success he had in 1969 was due to the '68 TV special. The power of the tube is amazing. Yes, the Memphis songs were quality, but so was Viva Las Vegas, Big Boss Man, Guitar Man and US Male. Those songs were vitually ignored. I remember after the TV special aired a girl commented to me about what a great song If I Can Dream was. I said it was available as a single. She had no idea. I do think the movies hurt Elvis. Perhaps if he had made an appearance on Ed Sullivan or Shindig in the mid 60's to plug his latest single, better chart success would have happened before 1969. Like I said, TV is a powerful mediuim.

Re: Elvis in the '60s

Thu Nov 29, 2012 3:08 am

r&b wrote:All very good points. To be honest the major reason Elvis had the success he had in 1969 was due to the '68 TV special. The power of the tube is amazing. Yes, the Memphis songs were quality, but so was Viva Las Vegas, Big Boss Man, Guitar Man and US Male. Those songs were vitually ignored. I remember after the TV special aired a girl commented to me about what a great song If I Can Dream was. I said it was available as a single. She had no idea. I do think the movies hurt Elvis. Perhaps if he had made an appearance on Ed Sullivan or Shindig in the mid 60's to plug his latest single, better chart success would have happened before 1969. Like I said, TV is a powerful mediuim.

Yes. The Hollywood exile almost killed his career.

Re: Elvis in the '60s

Thu Nov 29, 2012 4:19 am

drjohncarpenter wrote:
ale wrote:I love almost all his Nashville stuff from 1960 to '68, the Studio B sound is great so perfectly mixed and bounced.

Unfortunately, Elvis abandoned Nashville's Studio B after May 28, 1963, with only five (5) primarily studio sessions for the last six and a half years of the decade, one of which was almost exclusively gospel music.

January 12, 1964 - 3 songs only
May 26-28, 1966
June 12, 1966 - 3 vocal overdubs only
September 10-12, 1967
January 15-17, 1968 - 2 studio songs only


Again, the man abandoned his art, his craft, and some might argue, his soul.

ale wrote:In my case, I put them the same level as his 50's recordings ...

Wow, that's a true corner-case view.



Do you really think he abandoned his art, his craft....his soul in Nashville?? :roll:

Re: Elvis in the '60s

Thu Nov 29, 2012 5:26 am

ale wrote:
drjohncarpenter wrote:
ale wrote:I love almost all his Nashville stuff from 1960 to '68, the Studio B sound is great so perfectly mixed and bounced.

Unfortunately, Elvis abandoned Nashville's Studio B after May 28, 1963, with only five (5) primarily studio sessions for the last six and a half years of the decade, one of which was almost exclusively gospel music.

January 12, 1964 - 3 songs only
May 26-28, 1966
June 12, 1966 - 3 vocal overdubs only
September 10-12, 1967
January 15-17, 1968 - 2 studio songs only


Again, the man abandoned his art, his craft, and some might argue, his soul.

ale wrote:In my case, I put them the same level as his 50's recordings ...

Wow, that's a true corner-case view.



Do you really think he abandoned his art, his craft....his soul in Nashville?? :roll:

As noted, after mid-1963 he barely visited Nashville the rest of the decade for recording strictly studio material.

However, even at Studio B, the home of so many, many wonderful recordings by many, many amazing artists, Elvis Presley did indeed display a ... careless love:

Soundtrack Session for M.G.M.: Kissin' Cousins
RCA Studio B, Nashville, Tennessee, September 29-30, 1963

http://www.elvisrecordings.com/s630929.htm

Soundtrack Session for M.G.M.: Harum Scarum
RCA Studio B, Nashville, Tennessee, February 24-26, 1965

http://www.elvisrecordings.com/s650224.htm

Soundtrack Session for M.G.M.: Harum Scarum
RCA Studio B, Nashville, Tennessee, March 9, 1965

http://www.elvisrecordings.com/s650309.htm

Soundtrack Session for United Artists: Clambake
RCA Studio B, Nashville, Tennessee, February 21-23, 1967

http://www.elvisrecordings.com/s670221.htm

Soundtrack Session for United Artists: Clambake
RCA Studio B, Nashville, Tennessee, March 6, 1967

http://www.elvisrecordings.com/s670306.htm

Soundtrack Session for M.G.M.: Stay Away, Joe
RCA Studio B, Nashville, Tennessee, October 1, 1967

http://www.elvisrecordings.com/s671001.htm

The sad reality is that there are a lot of soulless recordings from these sessions, all at Studio B, my friend.