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The same damn place the band is

Sun Nov 11, 2012 12:46 pm

When Elvis was recording the film version of the song 'Wheels On My Heels', he wanted the Jordanaires to be heard on the film track but was reminded by the Director (?) that he would be riding a motorcycle when singing the song. Therefore, Elvis was asked, where would the Jordanaires be - to which Elvis retorted the same damn place the band is.

Does anyone know the history behind this story - is it true?

I seem to remember this anecdote through a conversation between Jerry Reed and Felton Jarvis from the BBC documentary - Presley.

Re: The same damn place the band is

Sun Nov 11, 2012 1:00 pm

I recall this from George Klein's "Memories" video circa 1980. Whether its true, the tone of Elvis' comment is expected by 1964 about his musicals.I always laughed, even as a kid, at that quote.

Re: The same damn place the band is

Sun Nov 11, 2012 4:03 pm

If this is true, History may be changed!

Re: The same damn place the band is

Sun Nov 11, 2012 8:32 pm

LesterB wrote:When Elvis was recording the film version of the song 'Wheels On My Heels', he wanted the Jordanaires to be heard on the film track but was reminded by the Director (?) that he would be riding a motorcycle when singing the song. Therefore, Elvis was asked, where would the Jordanaires be - to which Elvis retorted the same damn place the band is.

Does anyone know the history behind this story - is it true?

I seem to remember this anecdote through a conversation between Jerry Reed and Felton Jarvis from the BBC documentary - Presley.


Welcome back to the forum, big boy! Where have you been? Yes, it's in the "memories" TV show / video. I can just imagine Elvis making that gag.

Re: The same damn place the band is

Sun Nov 11, 2012 8:53 pm

If it's true, which I am not saying it isn't, it may be but one of the reasons he never got along with the Director, John Rich. Every death of a Pope (LOL), there comes along a person who inspite of Presley's likeability, would refuse (for reasons I can not really pinpoint), to be like 99 percent of those who ever met, and worked with Elvis, and that is, to be taken immediately by his earnerst charm, on a personal level.

He directed him again in "Easy come, easy go", where the relationship got worse as a result of the antics the members of the so called Memphis Mafia would play while shooting in the various locations, To the last man, or woman, these people, whether they were John Rich, Marlon Brando (after meeting him in 1957), or actor Larry Manetti, who was around during one of Elvis' last private visits to Hawaii, the commonality between them is their loss, for not having liked him, on a personal level (LOL).

Re: The same damn place the band is

Sun Nov 11, 2012 11:25 pm

LesterB wrote:When Elvis was recording the film version of the song 'Wheels On My Heels', he wanted the Jordanaires to be heard on the film track but was reminded by the Director (?) that he would be riding a motorcycle when singing the song. Therefore, Elvis was asked, where would the Jordanaires be - to which Elvis retorted the same damn place the band is.

Does anyone know the history behind this story - is it true?

It's a very well-known anecdote, and the retort sounds exactly like something Elvis would have said -- with a smile.

Director John Rich actually approached 1964's "Roustabout" with a level of seriousness that probably surprised everyone connected with the production, including the star. Perhaps the presence of legendary actress Barbara Stanwyck was a factor. In any case, this is why the comment was made during the March 3 session at Radio Recorders.

Their relationship was not tight. Rich did not cuddle Presley, and it may have been a bit unnerving, given Elvis' previous film project was the Sam Katzman "quickie" production, "Kissin' Cousins," and the fact that the Beatles were at that time turning the pop world upside down. During the filming, they scored slots #1 to #5 in the top ten -- an unprecedented, mind-blowing achievement.

That must have freaked Elvis out. His reign was over.

In an achievement unlikely to ever be equaled, for the week of 4 April 1964 The Beatles occupied the top five positions of the Billboard Hot 100 chart. In all they had 12 places on the US chart.

The chart placings were as follows, with the respective record labels in brackets:

1: Can't Buy Me Love (Capitol)
2: Twist And Shout (Tollie)
3: She Loves You (Swan)
4: I Want To Hold Your Hand (Capitol)
5: Please Please Me (Vee Jay)
31: I Saw Her Standing There (Capitol)
41: From Me To You (Vee Jay)
46: Do You Want To Know A Secret? (Vee Jay)
58: All My Loving (Capitol)
65: You Can't Do That (Capitol)
68: Roll Over Beethoven (Capitol)
79: Thank You Girl (Vee Jay)

There were also two Beatles tribute records on the list: We Love You Beatles by The Carefrees at 42, and A Letter To The Beatles by The Four Preps at 85.

The following week two more Beatles singles entered the chart: There's A Place (at 74) and Love Me Do (81).

4 April 1964: The Beatles occupy the Billboard Hot 100 top five | The Beatles Bible
http://www.beatlesbible.com/1964/04/04/beatles-billboard-hot-100-top-five/

Re: The same damn place the band is

Mon Nov 12, 2012 12:40 am

LesterB wrote:When Elvis was recording the film version of the song 'Wheels On My Heels', he wanted the Jordanaires to be heard on the film track but was reminded by the Director (?) that he would be riding a motorcycle when singing the song. Therefore, Elvis was asked, where would the Jordanaires be - to which Elvis retorted the same damn place the band is.
Does anyone know the history behind this story - is it true?
I seem to remember this anecdote through a conversation between Jerry Reed and Felton Jarvis from the BBC documentary - Presley.

Felton Jarvis recalled this anecdote when appearing in the aforementioned George Klein documentary, "Elvis Memories"; so it's more likely to have occurred under his watch so to speak.

With that in mind, it's probable that the song in question was actually Who Needs Money from the 1967 Felton Jarvis produced soundtrack Clambake.

phpBB [video]

Re: The same damn place the band is

Mon Nov 12, 2012 1:49 am

elvisalisellers wrote:
LesterB wrote:When Elvis was recording the film version of the song 'Wheels On My Heels', he wanted the Jordanaires to be heard on the film track but was reminded by the Director (?) that he would be riding a motorcycle when singing the song. Therefore, Elvis was asked, where would the Jordanaires be - to which Elvis retorted the same damn place the band is.
Does anyone know the history behind this story - is it true?
I seem to remember this anecdote through a conversation between Jerry Reed and Felton Jarvis from the BBC documentary - Presley.

Felton Jarvis recalled this anecdote when appearing in the aforementioned George Klein documentary, "Elvis Memories"; so it's more likely to have occurred under his watch so to speak.

With that in mind, it's probable that the song in question was actually Who Needs Money from the 1967 Felton Jarvis produced soundtrack Clambake.

phpBB [video]



this guy singing better then elvis here :)

Re: The same damn place the band is

Mon Nov 12, 2012 3:18 am

yeah I thought it was Clambake also.

Re: The same damn place the band is

Mon Nov 12, 2012 8:18 am

drjohncarpenter wrote:
LesterB wrote:When Elvis was recording the film version of the song 'Wheels On My Heels', he wanted the Jordanaires to be heard on the film track but was reminded by the Director (?) that he would be riding a motorcycle when singing the song. Therefore, Elvis was asked, where would the Jordanaires be - to which Elvis retorted the same damn place the band is.

Does anyone know the history behind this story - is it true?

It's a very well-known anecdote, and the retort sounds exactly like something Elvis would have said -- with a smile.

Director John Rich actually approached 1964's "Roustabout" with a level of seriousness that probably surprised everyone connected with the production, including the star. Perhaps the presence of legendary actress Barbara Stanwyck was a factor. In any case, this is why the comment was made during the March 3 session at Radio Recorders.

Their relationship was not tight. Rich did not cuddle Presley, and it may have been a bit unnerving, given Elvis' previous film project was the Sam Katzman "quickie" production, "Kissin' Cousins," and the fact that the Beatles were at that time turning the pop world upside down. During the filming, they scored slots #1 to #5 in the top ten -- an unprecedented, mind-blowing achievement.

That must have freaked Elvis out. His reign was over.

In an achievement unlikely to ever be equaled, for the week of 4 April 1964 The Beatles occupied the top five positions of the Billboard Hot 100 chart. In all they had 12 places on the US chart.

The chart placings were as follows, with the respective record labels in brackets:

1: Can't Buy Me Love (Capitol)
2: Twist And Shout (Tollie)
3: She Loves You (Swan)
4: I Want To Hold Your Hand (Capitol)
5: Please Please Me (Vee Jay)
31: I Saw Her Standing There (Capitol)
41: From Me To You (Vee Jay)
46: Do You Want To Know A Secret? (Vee Jay)
58: All My Loving (Capitol)
65: You Can't Do That (Capitol)
68: Roll Over Beethoven (Capitol)
79: Thank You Girl (Vee Jay)

There were also two Beatles tribute records on the list: We Love You Beatles by The Carefrees at 42, and A Letter To The Beatles by The Four Preps at 85.

The following week two more Beatles singles entered the chart: There's A Place (at 74) and Love Me Do (81).

4 April 1964: The Beatles occupy the Billboard Hot 100 top five | The Beatles Bible
http://www.beatlesbible.com/1964/04/04/beatles-billboard-hot-100-top-five/



Well, yes they scored many stunning chart achievements, but in the end, Elvis held his own - looking back. "Hound Dog/Don't Be Cruel" is an achievement that is equally unmatched. (I know about the Boyz To Men record, and the number of weeks, but this was a two-sided hit! In a much different business. And the fact that Elvis Presley sold about half of the all the records RCA Victor sold that first year of explosion.) And when you look at stats at the end of the day, he held his own. At the time, of course, it must have felt very strange to him. The Beatles happened almost immediately after some of his greatest record-selling achievements: his biggest seller was "It's Now or Never." He'd recently had big hit albums, hit films (unfortunately the hit albums tended to be soundtracks). And Roustabout itself, the album, hit Number #1, even amidst all this. But, this must have been unsettling, so soon. All of a sudden, Ed Sullivan threw him over for a new girlfriend, you might say. (And Parker decided to send that telegram. I can't imagine this acknowledgement that he had been cast aside like an ugly date, pleased him in any way.)

But at the end of the day, looking back, he held his own. IF one wants to make it a competition, which it never should have been. That sort of thing can drive an artist insane, if they take it seriously. The MOST, the BIGGEST, the UNPRECEDENTED . . . and then the fans start "competing" and hating each other, and that all stinks, in my view. By way of example, both Elvis fans and Michael Jackson fans were irritated by the marriage because, for one thing, each had gone over to the side of "the enemy." Both had "betrayed" their own fans. Because for many fans, it's supposed to be a competition, and no fraternization! (You can PRETEND to "be nice" to the competition, but for the fan, it's cutthroat. One Beatle-kid held that sign that said, bluntly: "Elvis is Dead - Long Live The Beatles." Dead? Dear God!) It's really silly, and a little disturbing, when you think about it, because the music should matter, not the numbers.

I (foolishly) stayed up 'till 4 AM last night reading the new Springsteen book, and you can see both the impact of Elvis, and not long after, the impact of the Beatles, on a kid who became a musician. They are CONNECTED: for musicians of a certain age co-hort, their achievements were really joint achievements, because one spurred on the other, and both were necessary to the young musicians who were inspired by both.

(It's a great book! You can see his indomitable will in mastering the guitar . . . it didn't come easy, and he worked very hard, and very long - hours and hours, daily. He had a lousy teacher as younger child, and ended up returning the first guitar, from when Elvis excited him as a young child. But then, after the Beatles, everyone wanted to be in a band, and so did he, and he got another one. And then he got an electric for Christmas. And he worked so HARD! Nothing was going to stop him, and he had a very difficult and confusing personal life as a kid. It's very inspirational. But, back on topic.)

Just wanted to clarify that it shouldn't be "Elvis vs. The Beatles." It should be Elvis AND the Beatles. Yet a lot of people still see it that way, unfortunately.

Just imho.

rjm (As to the famous anecdote, maybe he wished he wasn't fronting an invisible band . . . especially at that time.)

Re: The same damn place the band is

Mon Nov 12, 2012 8:35 am

Erhan wrote:
elvisalisellers wrote:
LesterB wrote:When Elvis was recording the film version of the song 'Wheels On My Heels', he wanted the Jordanaires to be heard on the film track but was reminded by the Director (?) that he would be riding a motorcycle when singing the song. Therefore, Elvis was asked, where would the Jordanaires be - to which Elvis retorted the same damn place the band is.
Does anyone know the history behind this story - is it true?
I seem to remember this anecdote through a conversation between Jerry Reed and Felton Jarvis from the BBC documentary - Presley.

Felton Jarvis recalled this anecdote when appearing in the aforementioned George Klein documentary, "Elvis Memories"; so it's more likely to have occurred under his watch so to speak.


With that in mind, it's probable that the song in question was actually Who Needs Money from the 1967 Felton Jarvis produced soundtrack Clambake.



This theory is incorrect. Ray Walker's contribution to "Who Needs Money?" was lyrical in conjunction to Presley's vocal which makes it required, and not just a backing track.

Re: The same damn place the band is

Mon Nov 12, 2012 1:39 pm

promiseland wrote:
Erhan wrote:
elvisalisellers wrote:
LesterB wrote:When Elvis was recording the film version of the song 'Wheels On My Heels', he wanted the Jordanaires to be heard on the film track but was reminded by the Director (?) that he would be riding a motorcycle when singing the song. Therefore, Elvis was asked, where would the Jordanaires be - to which Elvis retorted the same damn place the band is.
Does anyone know the history behind this story - is it true?
I seem to remember this anecdote through a conversation between Jerry Reed and Felton Jarvis from the BBC documentary - Presley.

Felton Jarvis recalled this anecdote when appearing in the aforementioned George Klein documentary, "Elvis Memories"; so it's more likely to have occurred under his watch so to speak.[i][i]
With that in mind, it's probable that the song in question was actually [i]Who Needs Money
from the 1967 Felton Jarvis produced soundtrack Clambake.

This theory is incorrect. Ray Walker's contribution to "Who Needs Money?" was lyrical in conjunction to[/i][/i][/i] Presley's vocal which makes it required, and not just a backing track.

Actually, I would say it was "dead on."

Ray Walker's "contribution" [which was overdubbed anyway] is irrelevant to the point made - re. Elvis wanting The Jordanaires to provide some background vocals to the "track."

Again, as Jarvis remembered the occurrence in detail [relaying the incident to Jerry Reed], the only song that fits would be Who Needs Money from the 1967 Felton Jarvis produced soundtrack Clambake.

Thank you. :wink:

Re: The same damn place the band is

Mon Nov 12, 2012 2:10 pm

rjm wrote:
drjohncarpenter wrote:
LesterB wrote:When Elvis was recording the film version of the song 'Wheels On My Heels', he wanted the Jordanaires to be heard on the film track but was reminded by the Director (?) that he would be riding a motorcycle when singing the song. Therefore, Elvis was asked, where would the Jordanaires be - to which Elvis retorted the same damn place the band is.

Does anyone know the history behind this story - is it true?

It's a very well-known anecdote, and the retort sounds exactly like something Elvis would have said -- with a smile.

Director John Rich actually approached 1964's "Roustabout" with a level of seriousness that probably surprised everyone connected with the production, including the star. Perhaps the presence of legendary actress Barbara Stanwyck was a factor. In any case, this is why the comment was made during the March 3 session at Radio Recorders.

Their relationship was not tight. Rich did not cuddle Presley, and it may have been a bit unnerving, given Elvis' previous film project was the Sam Katzman "quickie" production, "Kissin' Cousins," and the fact that the Beatles were at that time turning the pop world upside down. During the filming, they scored slots #1 to #5 in the top ten -- an unprecedented, mind-blowing achievement.

That must have freaked Elvis out. His reign was over.

In an achievement unlikely to ever be equaled, for the week of 4 April 1964 The Beatles occupied the top five positions of the Billboard Hot 100 chart. In all they had 12 places on the US chart.

The chart placings were as follows, with the respective record labels in brackets:

1: Can't Buy Me Love (Capitol)
2: Twist And Shout (Tollie)
3: She Loves You (Swan)
4: I Want To Hold Your Hand (Capitol)
5: Please Please Me (Vee Jay)
31: I Saw Her Standing There (Capitol)
41: From Me To You (Vee Jay)
46: Do You Want To Know A Secret? (Vee Jay)
58: All My Loving (Capitol)
65: You Can't Do That (Capitol)
68: Roll Over Beethoven (Capitol)
79: Thank You Girl (Vee Jay)

There were also two Beatles tribute records on the list: We Love You Beatles by The Carefrees at 42, and A Letter To The Beatles by The Four Preps at 85.

The following week two more Beatles singles entered the chart: There's A Place (at 74) and Love Me Do (81).

4 April 1964: The Beatles occupy the Billboard Hot 100 top five | The Beatles Bible
http://www.beatlesbible.com/1964/04/04/beatles-billboard-hot-100-top-five/



Well, yes they scored many stunning chart achievements, but in the end, Elvis held his own ...

The Beatles were about more than stunning chart achievements, and that example isn't just stunning, it's unprecedented. It even blew Bob Dylan's mind, in the midst of a cross-country drive, as you should well know.

The Beatles in fact managed to eclipse what Elvis accomplished in the previous decade. But the point here is their 1964 U.S. explosion was well under way at the time of the session in question, and likely an unspoken source of Elvis' frustration.

Re: The same damn place the band is

Mon Nov 12, 2012 2:54 pm

promiseland wrote:
elvisalisellers wrote:Felton Jarvis recalled this anecdote when appearing in the aforementioned George Klein documentary, "Elvis Memories"; so it's more likely to have occurred under his watch so to speak.


With that in mind, it's probable that the song in question was actually Who Needs Money from the 1967 Felton Jarvis produced soundtrack Clambake.


This theory is incorrect. Ray Walker's contribution to "Who Needs Money?" was lyrical in conjunction to Presley's vocal which makes it required, and not just a backing track.

Good point, dead-on, in fact, but not the only one that helps to correct this error.

First of all, I'm pretty sure the anecdote is cited in Hopkins' 1971 biography, and explicitly references "Roustabout."

Secondly, by 1967, neither "Clambake" director Arthur Nadel nor producers Arthur Gardner, Arnold Laven or Jules Levy would have cared at all to fly out and be a part of one of the February 1967 Nashville soundtrack sessions, or to have interjected in such fashion.

On the other hand, as noted, in 1964 John Rich was a far more ambitious director who could easily have been at the West Hollywood location of Radio Recorders, and had just come off winning a Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Comedy Emmy for his work on "The Dick Van Dyke Show," at the May 16, 1963 ceremonies.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Rich_(director)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/15th_Primetime_Emmy_Awards#Outstanding_Directorial_Achievement_in_Comedy


Finally, "Roustabout" was made by Paramount, a Hal Wallis production. By 1964, Elvis had come to the conclusion that Wallis only made Presley pictures to underwrite the films he really cared about. Case-in-point, the just-released "Becket," starring Richard Burton, Peter O'Toole and John Gielgud, which would go on to earn 12 Academy Award nominations and win one, for Best Writing (Adapted Screenplay), at the April 5, 1965 ceremonies. This Oscar went to Edward Anhalt, who co-wrote the screenplay for Elvis' 1962 Paramount feature, "Girls! Girls! Girls!"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Anhalt
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Becket_(1964_film)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Anhalthttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/37th_Academy_Awards_nominees_and_winners#Awards


In many ways, 1964 would be a rough year for Elvis.

Re: The same damn place the band is

Mon Nov 12, 2012 3:55 pm

drjohncarpenter wrote:Good point, dead-on, in fact, but not the only one that helps to correct this error.
First of all, I'm pretty sure the anecdote is cited in Hopkins' 1971 biography, and explicitly references "Roustabout."

Could you be so kind to provide a scan of that alleged Hopkins quote? Thanks!

Re: The same damn place the band is

Mon Nov 12, 2012 4:57 pm

elvisalisellers wrote:
drjohncarpenter wrote:Good point, dead-on, in fact, but not the only one that helps to correct this error.
First of all, I'm pretty sure the anecdote is cited in Hopkins' 1971 biography, and explicitly references "Roustabout."

Could you be so kind to provide a scan of that alleged Hopkins quote? Thanks!

Alleged. :D

I don't have the Hopkins book handy, but in Alanna Nash's 2010 biography there is a direct quote from Felton Jarvis, who speaks of director John RIch and his film "Roustabout":


Baby Let's Play House p395.jpg
Alanna Nash, Baby Let's Play House (New York: It Books, January 5, 2010)


Maybe you need to revisit that George Klein documentary and listen with care. ;-)

Thank you.
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

Re: The same damn place the band is

Mon Nov 12, 2012 5:34 pm

drjohncarpenter wrote:Maybe you need to revisit that George Klein documentary and listen with care.

I have that VHS George Klein documentary [I take it you don't?], and at no point does Jarvis refer to the "Roustabout" soundtrack nor director John Rich when relating the first-hand anecdote under discussion.

Re: The same damn place the band is

Mon Nov 12, 2012 10:42 pm

1. I remember it from Hopkins, too. Spent about an hour in the middle of the night trying to find it! Couldn't but I know I read it. Early. When he was alive. Never "heard" it. I read it. In high school. It is an early anecdote. And I don't know if Felton was interviewed that early on.

The danged book has no index! It always drives me nuts.

And I am not "taking sides," as you all are about to see.

2. About the Beatles. No. I dont even think we're talking about the same thing. Elvis Presley challenged and subverted social norms like NO other figure (individual or group). He was "a jug of corn liquor at a champaign party." He savagely disturbed barriers of sexuality, race, and class. Others followed, but no one absorbed the ire he did because he created the disturbance that broke and transformed the century, at least on a cultural level. At least.

The Beatles created a seismic paradigm shift. It was huge, volcanic. That is a fact. Now every kid needed to be "in a band." And they relied on no one else for their material, which was structurally new and instantly exciting. Their records are STILL great, and haven't dated. Without them, rock and roll may have perished. Instead it grew exponentially. But what norms did they upset? They had floppy hair. But they started out almost asexually, and did NOT "cross over" the racial divide - not in the least. And they WERE, eventually, "a champaign party," lauded for "high art"! (Yes, they became openly political. They didn't, though, start that idea by any means.)

They did not render Elvis Preley's acheivement a matter of secondary significance. That becomes a logical paradox. Elvis Presley is the reason they existed at all, and not as a mere "influence." He was the reason they were POSSIBLE at all! Because he changed things, important things, that they did not. Let me see, I would tell "them," simply: "you didn't build that. Somebody else made that happen." And I would mean it. (Elvis, of course, also stood on the shoulders of giants. But he transformed what came before into something that was genininely threatening to the social order in which he performed. And he knew it, too. The '69 monologues are proof enough of that.)

They did not reduce, erase, or "eclipse" his achievement of the previous ten (8) years! Unless you mean that word literally. A total eclipse only demonstrates the power of the Sun.

(This is not personal, and I'm sure you know I'm not arguing it for my amusement or because I want to bust your chops. I'm not into that. I think you know that; I have no axe to grind, and I respect you. {Which is one reason I'm writing this, BECAUSE I respect your opinion so much.} I've heard this argument from Jumpstreet. And it's wrong, no matter who makes it. In my view.)

And I am not not one of those Elvis-nuts with two dozen Elvis-plates hanging from the walls! I have no "Elvis Room." His books and records are with my other books and records.

You are, nevertheless, probably right about "Roustabout."

And, now that I have p**ed off EVERYBODY, may God have mercy on my soul. {ducking for cover}

rjm (now, back to the InvisibleBand)

Sent from my SCH-I800 using Tapatalk 2

Re: The same damn place the band is

Mon Nov 12, 2012 11:30 pm

rjm, are you perhaps confusing the other quote attributed to Elvis' association with John Rich and "Roustabout," re. "...when these damn movies cease to be fun, I'll stop doing them. And if my guys go, (expletive), so do I" ?

The occurrence Jarvis recalled in the first-hand [re. "...the same damn place the band is"], would obviously exclude "Roustabout" as the film in question, as it pre-dates his working relationship with Elvis by over 2 years.

P.S. I can't speak for others, but you could never p*ss me off. :smt007

Re: The same damn place the band is

Tue Nov 13, 2012 12:20 am

elvisalisellers wrote:rjm, are you perhaps confusing the other quote attributed to Elvis' association with John Rich and "Roustabout," re. "...when these damn movies cease to be fun, I'll stop doing them. And if my guys go, (expletive), so do I" ?



No. I read that one later, much later. And I'm sure as shootin' that quote is not in Hopkins, or anything that early. (Again, from memory, I saw the above quotation in the special edition of Life magazine that was later released as a hard-cover book. The one with the red cover, and the lovely color photo from '56. It was astride a photo of them clowning on the set. I could run up and get it now, but I'm pretty sure. I will, if you wish, and scan that in.) I remember the one is question because it was really funny. I don't think it matters much which film, because they were all the same, essentially. But if it was an issue of him defending the use of the Jordanaires, that itself would suggest an earlier date - because it would have come up as an issue earlier - the issue being about whether the back-up singers should be audible, yet invisible (along with the "damn band"!). Elvis never did like those kinds of musicals: where people busted into song in bizarre settings, yet there he was, doing it.

But that's not why I think so. It's because I know when I read it, and I never saw/heard that interview, even today. Still never saw it. Just one of those things. I started being a fan in the latter part of '73, after an "incident" involving a girl who saw a concert, and in response to questions about it, simply said, with the icy coldness of a bully: "he got fat." For some reason, it made me go bat-s***, and I went out that afternoon, after school, crossed the cemetery to get to the stores, and and got my first Elvis record. Along with some bright green sparkly nail polish, as I recall. (My mind works in weird ways! LOL! But it does work.)

At some point, definitely before he died, I bought that book, and read it 'till it fell apart. When he died, I got another copy, and it started falling apart, a long time ago. I have both of 'em. (Or what is left of them. The second one is readable.)

I would like to see the exchange between Felton and Jerry Reed. Is it on YouTube, perhaps? (I possibly have the documentary somewhere, but I haven't watched that interview.) An interesting question would be: "when was the first time that Felton was interviewed?" This seems clearly after Elvis died (they did that Guitar Man posthumous thing, where Jerry re-recorded his guitar). Which would be after I had already read it.

In any case, whenever it happened, it was funny, and showed the absurdity of what he was being asked to do. The comment shows that he saw things a lot more clearly than those who produced those blasted things they called "films."

elvisalisellers wrote:The occurrence Jarvis recalled in the first-hand [re. "...the same damn place the band is"], would obviously exclude "Roustabout" as the film in question, as it pre-dates his working relationship with Elvis by over 2 years.


Yes, if he related it in terms of him being there, it would. It's just that I read it so early, and I feel to my bones it's somewhere in Hopkins, because I must have read that book 100 times before he died! But, memory is a funny thing, and I suppose it could be somewhere else. I am absolutely certain, though, that I read it. I have never seen that interview, and never "heard" the anecdote. I will try the Rolling Stone Illustrated History of Rock and Roll - Guralnick's essay. (He also put that one into one of his essay-collection books, with an added essay, which was very good. I think it was Lost Highway where his two Elvis essays reside.) I don't think it was in Peter's essays, though. I still think it was in Hopkins. But I dove into it last night, furiously, and couldn't find the da** thing. (I thought it was Lance, actually, who related it, but apparently it wasn't. I wish I could scan that thing into a computer somehow, and get it indexed. There must be software that does that. Or maybe it can be Kindled, but I doubt it.)

There wasn't much in print at the time of a serious nature. I didn't read those "movie magazines" then. And I never touched the tabloids 'till years later. Oh, I saw the cover of Ginger's interview at the grocery store, all right. Elvis was pictured on the cover. Dead. But, I didn't read that stuff then.

If I could just find the doggone quote . . . but when you're looking for something, you just don't find it. I would like to actually see/hear the interview.

rjm
P.S. -- Thanks for replying. I fear someone else is loading for bear right now . . . {tremble} (I LIKE the Beatles! I do!)

Re: The same damn place the band is

Tue Nov 13, 2012 12:38 am

Found this on the 'net.

From "allexperts.com"

There is one amusing quote from Elvis that I like, made during the making of "Roustabout". The song "Wheels On My Heels" was performed in the film as Elvis rode along a country road an a motorcycle. He wanted backing singers on the recording, but the film people said, "No way, the audience will not accept voices coming from nowhere like that as you ride along on a motorcycle." Elvis immediately replied, "Don't worry, if they accept a band playing in the middle of thin air, they'll accept a few backing singers!"

http://en.allexperts.com/q/Presley-Elvi ... tation.htm

Expert: Mel Priddle - 4/20/2003

Other than "Mel Priddle," there is NO CITATION! (Argggghhhh! Sometimes, something gets you, just because. I mean, it really doesn't matter, except that at this point, let's just settle it!)


Now, someone, somewhere cited "Wheels On My Heels." But the cite? (BTW, "Mel"'s quote is inexact: it is only a paraphrase. The actual quote is "the same damn place the band" is coming from.)

rjm

Re: The same damn place the band is

Tue Nov 13, 2012 1:06 am

rjm wrote:Found this on the 'net.

From "allexperts.com"

There is one amusing quote from Elvis that I like, made during the making of "Roustabout". The song "Wheels On My Heels" was performed in the film as Elvis rode along a country road an a motorcycle. He wanted backing singers on the recording, but the film people said, "No way, the audience will not accept voices coming from nowhere like that as you ride along on a motorcycle." Elvis immediately replied, "Don't worry, if they accept a band playing in the middle of thin air, they'll accept a few backing singers!"

http://en.allexperts.com/q/Presley-Elvi ... tation.htm

Expert: Mel Priddle - 4/20/2003

Other than "Mel Priddle," there is NO CITATION! (Argggghhhh! Sometimes, something gets you, just because. I mean, it really doesn't matter, Except that at this point, let's just settle it!)

Now, someone, somewhere cited "Wheels On My Heels." But the cite? (BTW, "Mel"'s quote is inexact: it is only a paraphrase. The actual quote is "the same damn place the band" is coming from.)

You're right, that quote by "Expert: Mel Priddle" is misleading and incorrect.

Unfortunately, the net is awash with misattributed quotes and information.

Just recently, I spotted one that led you to believe that Elvis joined the crowd at the L.A. Forum to boogie on down with Tom Jones!

Re: The same damn place the band is

Tue Nov 13, 2012 2:15 am

elvisalisellers wrote:
rjm wrote:Found this on the 'net.

From "allexperts.com"

There is one amusing quote from Elvis that I like, made during the making of "Roustabout". The song "Wheels On My Heels" was performed in the film as Elvis rode along a country road an a motorcycle. He wanted backing singers on the recording, but the film people said, "No way, the audience will not accept voices coming from nowhere like that as you ride along on a motorcycle." Elvis immediately replied, "Don't worry, if they accept a band playing in the middle of thin air, they'll accept a few backing singers!"

http://en.allexperts.com/q/Presley-Elvi ... tation.htm

Expert: Mel Priddle - 4/20/2003

Other than "Mel Priddle," there is NO CITATION! (Argggghhhh! Sometimes, something gets you, just because. I mean, it really doesn't matter, Except that at this point, let's just settle it!)

Now, someone, somewhere cited "Wheels On My Heels." But the cite? (BTW, "Mel"'s quote is inexact: it is only a paraphrase. The actual quote is "the same damn place the band" is coming from.)

You're right, that quote by "Expert: Mel Priddle" is misleading and incorrect.

Unfortunately, the net is awash with misattributed quotes and information.

Just recently, I spotted one that led you to believe that Elvis joined the crowd at the L.A. Forum to boogie on down with Tom Jones!


I just tore into three different books: must have broke the "speed-reading" record set by Evelyn Wood. I'm plum-tuckered out. I do have that book now filled with sticky notes for each classic anecdote I did find! (I even went digging through Goldman, which was a distasteful experience.) So I'll just let the two of you slug it out! It's such a silly little thing; amazing how it can drive anyone up a wall!

One observation: the Clambake singing bike ride is a duet. I do not hear backing vocalists. And the dispute had to do with where the invisible music was coming from. In that song, only the band is invisible. But . . . IF Felton was actually present, and Nash's quote indicates that he was not, we'd have to find another motorcycle-singing-scene, from after Felton's appearance on the scene, for Felton to have been present. Anyway, he's relating something that happened previously, according to the quotation from this interview that I haven't seen. (Which is why I'd like to see the interview. This was a BBC thing? Was it shown in America? I saw 'em all - all that were here. I don't recall that interview. In any event, is it on YouTube? If anyone has it, could they upload it?)

And I'm done with this!

rjm (off to other threads, and other things -- I think I need a bike ride in the park or something, some air)
P.S. -- Doc, please say something about my Beatles diatribe! Even "you are incorrect." Just something, anything at all . . . I'm starting to feel like this: smt153
Last edited by rjm on Tue Nov 13, 2012 2:38 am, edited 1 time in total.

Re: The same damn place the band is

Tue Nov 13, 2012 2:37 am

rjm wrote:...I'll just let the two of you slug it out! It's such a silly little thing; amazing how it can drive anyone up a wall!

That could be fun as I haven't boxed in years.

I'm gonna start a new training regime tomorrow!

Re: The same damn place the band is

Tue Nov 13, 2012 5:35 am

elvisalisellers wrote:Just recently, I spotted one that led you to believe that Elvis joined the crowd at the L.A. Forum to boogie on down with Tom Jones!

Such a rude, jealous person. And evidently blind, too:
http://www.elvis-collectors.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=73357&p=1100598#p1100598

Here on this topic, I've received no thanks for going out of my way to research and post -- at your request -- a definitive piece of evidence regarding this debate (Nash scan), on top of my latest extremely detailed, well-researched previous post. You're off the list. Bye!

---

rjm wrote:So I'll just let the two of you slug it out!

There's nothing to "slug." He's been proven wrong, but chooses to make graceless put-down jokes rather than deal with the egg on his face. I don't go around making baseless declarations. Next.

rjm wrote:P.S. -- Doc, please say something about my Beatles diatribe!

Your impassioned reply -- not diatribe -- is appreciated. It's just not quite right.