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Re: Time Warner and Elvis On Tour

Sun Nov 11, 2012 12:35 am

A few thoughts come to mind in relation to some of the discussions so far. With regard to restoration costs and one comment being that the poor quality of the outtakes on the 2 disc edition of TTWII SE is indicative of how much restoration would be required. I'm going strictly on memory here but I seem to remember the Warner rep being challenged over the quality of the outtakes at one of the insiders conferences during Elvis week (a few years back) and he was very apologetic. He said that the original outtakes planned in 2001 -presumably the restored ones - were lost and they had had to use his VHS cassette copy for the DVD release! The other question is how much has actually been restored as part of the TTTWIS SE and earlier with the Lost Performances in relation to performances that ended up not being used in both projects? The other thought is that a package involving out-takes from TTWII and EOT would not have to be restored to the quality of TTWII SE. This was a cinema release that needed to be projected at 35mm and the while the quality is fantastic it would not be required to do this level of restoration for a TV, DVD, Blu Ray release project. If you consider the quality of some of the bootleg EOT footage particularly the most recent 'escape' with the rehearsal footage (blue suit and gold scarf) the one with Elvis racing through the oldies like Love Me. Consider the more than watchable quality of this footage and then consider that it is more than likely a video transfer from the original film footage copied onto VHS and sold to one of the super-fan collectors by someone within in warners or a company/individual subcontracted to work with the footage. On this basis the original film would appear to be in more than acceptable condition for a straight digital transfer without the need for restoration of the original film. The most financially viable project would be to release EOT as the original edit with JBG reinstated and include the outakes as bonus discs without much restoration beyond a straight transfer of the stock. A re-edit of the film for cinema release as was done with TTWII is less likely to turn a profit.

Regarding the profit/financial viability of any TTWII and/or EOT project I struggle to see how DVD projects including outtakes from other artists can turn a profit and be deemed viable while not Elvis. One example being the Chuck Berry film Hail Hail Rock'n'Roll film which was released a few years back on DVD with 53 extra minutes of rehearsal footage and lots of other bonus features. There are countless other similar examples. Today I noticed that a blu ray version of the Doors at Hollywood Bowl has been released and the original film re-edited and restored and at a time when these types of releases no longer end up on the supermarket shelves like they did even 5 years ago. Queen live in Hungry is another example of a release this year on Blu-ray and fully restored. However I do a agree that physical format is in major decline and that you get that feeling in your gut that the type of release we are talking about should have been about 5 years ago as DVD sales peaked.

However, as one poster noted, with different marketing and sales strategies there is viability to projects using this footage. The mediums could be TV, digital download, DVD and Blu Ray. Once the footage is transferred/restored it could be used/edited for multiple projects. As discussed documentaries including current footage of surviving band members and MM reflecting back on 70 and 72. As previously discussed the footage could also be edited into volumes of rehearsals and the complete live concerts themselves.

Multi-marketing is how to make such as project viable. The reissue of Springsteen's Darkness on the Edge of Town is an interesting one as this was released as a big collectors package with a bound book format with 3 cd ands three DVD's (documentary/live shows/ in studio footage and so on) and there was also a blu ray version (about £90). However a 2 cd version of 'Darkness' also hit the main-stream and one of the documetaries also had a single blu ray release as well as TV broadcast.

With EOT and TTWII you could initially go for the high-end market with a strategy as above but you could also, a couple of years down the line, release the single concerts on budget DVD for the bargin bins of the supermarkets. Some have commented that none of the live dates on EOT have the historic significance of MSG (which is true) and are therefore not events that can be promoted in the same way. However again with a bit of clever marketing local markets could be exploited involving the 4 cities which we know were definitely filmed. Such cities could very much be targeted for specific promotional and marketing campaigns such as 'Elvis in Richmond live 1972'. You have the fans and general pubic who saw the concert wanting to buy it as a a memento and to relive it perhaps even to spot themselves in the audience. You have also potentially got the non-fan curious enough to buy a single DVD of Elvis playing their home town. A reproduction concert ticket, small booklet including reviews from the show, reproduction of the programme sold on the April tour. The cost of advertising in local media has reduced a lot and a local city level such a release could gain some attention. Breakfast TV shows promoting it interviewing those that attended the actual concert about their memories of the event.

What do you think......if 10.000 of us put in £50 each we could raises £500,000 we could offer to part produce with Warners, EPE and possibly some of your bigger Elvis collectors (Tunzi, Hanna and so on). If it bombed we'd individually only be out of pocket to the sum of night on the town and not even a particularly excessive one!!

We can dream. As Dr John commented I do feel for the first generation of fans as time is ever passing.

Re: Time Warner and Elvis On Tour

Sun Nov 11, 2012 12:45 am

poormadpeter wrote:... fifteen years after a re-release of Gold Records 5 someone is moaning because the wonder of you wasn't included!

likethebike wrote:"Elvis attracts a special kind of fan. Yip." Again more fan and fellow poster bashing. Really??? If you want to argue, argue but the world can do without the self-congratulatory dismissals.

poormadpeter wrote:Any fan who...
... deserves to be verbally bashed.

Interesting how that one-way street thingy works.

Carry on.


::rocks
Last edited by Blue River on Sun Nov 11, 2012 12:48 am, edited 1 time in total.

Re: Time Warner and Elvis On Tour

Sun Nov 11, 2012 12:48 am

poormadpeter wrote:The fans lack approximately 2 minutes of it on DVD. Sad? Yes.

No, it's inexcusable.

It's odd you ignore the artistic process in your argument here, when you embrace it so fiercely elsewhere.

The opening sets up the entire film, it was carefully edited by Adidge and Abel to specifically match the images we see on the screen. And the Golden Globe was given for the film people saw in 1972-1973. Period.

I love the original introduction. It grabs you right away, from the sound of Elvis' own voice, to the 1937 image that comes up out of the darkness. Maybe someday we'll be able to own it on DVD and Blu-ray.


phpBB [video]


Elvis On Tour (2010 Release with Original Intro)
Uploaded by Anton Jeldres Tiselj on Aug 31, 2010
I hated the new "Don't Be Cruel" intro with all my guts, so I restored it back to
the original version that includes "Johnny B. Goode"...
This is what I see on my DVD player now :)


Re: Time Warner and Elvis On Tour

Sun Nov 11, 2012 1:09 am

Ok, let's say the 4 concerts restored will cost 3 million dollars to put them on 3 or 4 DVD discs (with also the original release) . So doesn't EPE have these money???? When the estate makes tens of milion of dollars profit every year because of us, the fans????? These concerts are a very important Elvis's legacy and maybe the final one, because Elvis in concert 1977 is far away from that. So it's not excuse for them to not put all the efforts in such project (sooner or later it must be released and it's once in a lifetime, not every year or so). I am sick and tired about those money figures, and questions like if the release of these 4 DVD's will lose money or not. Those people are fans or Colonel Parker or what???

Re: Time Warner and Elvis On Tour

Sun Nov 11, 2012 1:19 am

drjohncarpenter wrote:
poormadpeter wrote:The fans lack approximately 2 minutes of it on DVD. Sad? Yes.

No, it's inexcusable.

It's odd you ignore the artistic process in your argument here, when you embrace it so fiercely elsewhere.

The opening sets up the entire film, it was carefully edited by Adidge and Abel to specifically match the images we see on the screen. And the Golden Globe was given for the film people saw in 1972-1973. Period.

I love the original introduction. It grabs you right away, from the sound of Elvis' own voice, to the 1937 image that comes up out of the darkness. Maybe someday we'll be able to own it on DVD and Blu-ray.


phpBB [video]


Elvis On Tour (2010 Release with Original Intro)
Uploaded by Anton Jeldres Tiselj on Aug 31, 2010
I hated the new "Don't Be Cruel" intro with all my guts, so I restored it back to
the original version that includes "Johnny B. Goode"...
This is what I see on my DVD player now :)




I agree with everything you say. Quite what happened with copyright issues over JBG is something we will probably never get to the bottom of.

BUT if you read what I and others have written in this thread and elsewhere, we are lucky to have Elvis films on silver discs at all when the trend is going towards burn on demand issues for older films, particularly in the USA. Aside from those opening minutes, the film looks and sounds considerably better than it ever has. Yes, we can moan about the change to the intro. Yes, we have a right to. But, if the only options were to issue with a new intro or not release it at all, then the right decision was made.

And let's not forget that these issues of song copyrights are not only affecting EOT. Somgs were cut from a vhs edition of Aloha, for example. The TV series Happy Days had to have songs replaced before DVD release. And the USA TV series The Wonder Years (winner itself of a Golden Globe and Four Emmys) - one of the most requested tv series ever for a dvd release - still has no hope of being released in the foreseeable future due to song copyrights.

Re: Time Warner and Elvis On Tour

Sun Nov 11, 2012 3:13 am

please can somebody start a petition to lisa marie epe or warner???? we have to start somewhere please

Re: Time Warner and Elvis On Tour

Sun Nov 11, 2012 3:24 am

jurasic1968 wrote:Ok, let's say the 4 concerts restored will cost 3 million dollars to put them on 3 or 4 DVD discs (with also the original release) . So doesn't EPE have these money???? When the estate makes tens of milion of dollars profit every year because of us, the fans????? These concerts are a very important Elvis's legacy and maybe the final one, because Elvis in concert 1977 is far away from that. So it's not excuse for them to not put all the efforts in such project (sooner or later it must be released and it's once in a lifetime, not every year or so). I am sick and tired about those money figures, and questions like if the release of these 4 DVD's will lose money or not. Those people are fans or Colonel Parker or what???


EPE HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH ELVIS ON TOUR.
perhaps if we put it in large print, it might sink in.


But I doubt it.

Re: Time Warner and Elvis On Tour

Sun Nov 11, 2012 3:25 am

Gary Crawford wrote:A few thoughts come to mind in relation to some of the discussions so far. With regard to restoration costs and one comment being that the poor quality of the outtakes on the 2 disc edition of TTWII SE is indicative of how much restoration would be required. I'm going strictly on memory here but I seem to remember the Warner rep being challenged over the quality of the outtakes at one of the insiders conferences during Elvis week (a few years back) and he was very apologetic. He said that the original outtakes planned in 2001 -presumably the restored ones - were lost and they had had to use his VHS cassette copy for the DVD release! The other question is how much has actually been restored as part of the TTTWIS SE and earlier with the Lost Performances in relation to performances that ended up not being used in both projects? The other thought is that a package involving out-takes from TTWII and EOT would not have to be restored to the quality of TTWII SE. This was a cinema release that needed to be projected at 35mm and the while the quality is fantastic it would not be required to do this level of restoration for a TV, DVD, Blu Ray release project. If you consider the quality of some of the bootleg EOT footage particularly the most recent 'escape' with the rehearsal footage (blue suit and gold scarf) the one with Elvis racing through the oldies like Love Me. Consider the more than watchable quality of this footage and then consider that it is more than likely a video transfer from the original film footage copied onto VHS and sold to one of the super-fan collectors by someone within in warners or a company/individual subcontracted to work with the footage. On this basis the original film would appear to be in more than acceptable condition for a straight digital transfer without the need for restoration of the original film. The most financially viable project would be to release EOT as the original edit with JBG reinstated and include the outakes as bonus discs without much restoration beyond a straight transfer of the stock. A re-edit of the film for cinema release as was done with TTWII is less likely to turn a profit.

Regarding the profit/financial viability of any TTWII and/or EOT project I struggle to see how DVD projects including outtakes from other artists can turn a profit and be deemed viable while not Elvis. One example being the Chuck Berry film Hail Hail Rock'n'Roll film which was released a few years back on DVD with 53 extra minutes of rehearsal footage and lots of other bonus features. There are countless other similar examples. Today I noticed that a blu ray version of the Doors at Hollywood Bowl has been released and the original film re-edited and restored and at a time when these types of releases no longer end up on the supermarket shelves like they did even 5 years ago. Queen live in Hungry is another example of a release this year on Blu-ray and fully restored. However I do a agree that physical format is in major decline and that you get that feeling in your gut that the type of release we are talking about should have been about 5 years ago as DVD sales peaked.

However, as one poster noted, with different marketing and sales strategies there is viability to projects using this footage. The mediums could be TV, digital download, DVD and Blu Ray. Once the footage is transferred/restored it could be used/edited for multiple projects. As discussed documentaries including current footage of surviving band members and MM reflecting back on 70 and 72. As previously discussed the footage could also be edited into volumes of rehearsals and the complete live concerts themselves.

Multi-marketing is how to make such as project viable. The reissue of Springsteen's Darkness on the Edge of Town is an interesting one as this was released as a big collectors package with a bound book format with 3 cd ands three DVD's (documentary/live shows/ in studio footage and so on) and there was also a blu ray version (about £90). However a 2 cd version of 'Darkness' also hit the main-stream and one of the documetaries also had a single blu ray release as well as TV broadcast.

With EOT and TTWII you could initially go for the high-end market with a strategy as above but you could also, a couple of years down the line, release the single concerts on budget DVD for the bargin bins of the supermarkets. Some have commented that none of the live dates on EOT have the historic significance of MSG (which is true) and are therefore not events that can be promoted in the same way. However again with a bit of clever marketing local markets could be exploited involving the 4 cities which we know were definitely filmed. Such cities could very much be targeted for specific promotional and marketing campaigns such as 'Elvis in Richmond live 1972'. You have the fans and general pubic who saw the concert wanting to buy it as a a memento and to relive it perhaps even to spot themselves in the audience. You have also potentially got the non-fan curious enough to buy a single DVD of Elvis playing their home town. A reproduction concert ticket, small booklet including reviews from the show, reproduction of the programme sold on the April tour. The cost of advertising in local media has reduced a lot and a local city level such a release could gain some attention. Breakfast TV shows promoting it interviewing those that attended the actual concert about their memories of the event.

What do you think......if 10.000 of us put in £50 each we could raises £500,000 we could offer to part produce with Warners, EPE and possibly some of your bigger Elvis collectors (Tunzi, Hanna and so on). If it bombed we'd individually only be out of pocket to the sum of night on the town and not even a particularly excessive one!!

We can dream. As Dr John commented I do feel for the first generation of fans as time is ever passing.


So, again, you want it restored, but only restored a little bit? Yep, that'll please fans.

Re: Time Warner and Elvis On Tour

Sun Nov 11, 2012 3:30 am

it wouldn't surprise me if all the outtakes are long gone now

if this happened it would seriously break my heart as in terms of concert footage left this is the holly grail along with TTWII surely they have got it all ?

Re: Time Warner and Elvis On Tour

Sun Nov 11, 2012 3:40 am

yes i know EPE had nothing to do with ....but i think the have maybe a litlle bit more to say then a messgeboard and can at least get some answers

Re: Time Warner and Elvis On Tour

Sun Nov 11, 2012 3:48 am

ep2 wrote:yes i know EPE had nothing to do with ....but i think the have maybe a litlle bit more to say then a messgeboard and can at least get some answers


How? Why? They can't put pressure on another company to release something. Even the Ask Ernst section of this website has stated that EPE have no sway if and when the material is released.

Once again, the bottom line is money. If the project isn't likely to make money, then it doesn't get carried out. And all the dragons den-style proposals that various people come up with on here have probably been thought of before at Warner and rejected because there is no money in it.

Re: Time Warner and Elvis On Tour

Sun Nov 11, 2012 4:50 am

Poormadpeter

I wrote the post below in 2009 regarding a potential MSG project. Not so far off from what has just been released this week. [/b] There are always some who will dismiss any suggestions for such releases as the rants of delusional fans.

You do not answer why such projects are viable for other artists and not Elvis. Regarding restoration - of course some fans will be unhappy if it is not up to the standard of TTWII SE in terms of PQ but then some fans soon moaned about the song choices and omissions, the wrong versions, the editing was to MTV style and so it went on. However what would people prefer, the film outtakes continues to gather dust or are released to an acceptable/watchable standard (as in better than the existing bootleg footage)


Gary Crawford
Post subject: Re: short MSG filmPosted: Sun Mar 22, 2009 5:45 pm


Joined: Fri Sep 10, 2004 8:11 pm
Posts: 85
If EPE and other parties like BMG collaberated there could be an excellent Madison Square Garden project. A box set could include both concerts with the audio mastered in 5.1 surround. A book covering the event with text and photos particularly the new ones released last year by that new york photographer (forget his name). A DVD film covering the concerts and build up featuring interviews with band members,fans, and celebrity's in attendance. Footage wise we have the full press conference and concert wise we have the NBC film now verified with matching sound. On top of this if the original Bob Heis 8mm footage can be sourced along with the footage by that European arty film director with the, hopefully post production, camera blur and double images removed that would also be stunning footage albeit silent. The madison square garden internal video system probably only showed it live to VIP's watching and didn't record but who knows?

_________________
Vegas Nights

Re: Time Warner and Elvis On Tour

Sun Nov 11, 2012 5:28 am

Gary Crawford wrote:Poormadpeter

I wrote the post below in 2009 regarding a potential MSG project. Not so far off from what has just been released this week. [/b] There are always some who will dismiss any suggestions for such releases as the rants of delusional fans.

You do not answer why such projects are viable for other artists and not Elvis. Regarding restoration - of course some fans will be unhappy if it is not up to the standard of TTWII SE in terms of PQ but then some fans soon moaned about the song choices and omissions, the wrong versions, the editing was to MTV style and so it went on. However what would people prefer, the film outtakes continues to gather dust or are released to an acceptable/watchable standard (as in better than the existing bootleg footage)


Gary Crawford
Post subject: Re: short MSG filmPosted: Sun Mar 22, 2009 5:45 pm


Joined: Fri Sep 10, 2004 8:11 pm
Posts: 85
If EPE and other parties like BMG collaberated there could be an excellent Madison Square Garden project. A box set could include both concerts with the audio mastered in 5.1 surround. A book covering the event with text and photos particularly the new ones released last year by that new york photographer (forget his name). A DVD film covering the concerts and build up featuring interviews with band members,fans, and celebrity's in attendance. Footage wise we have the full press conference and concert wise we have the NBC film now verified with matching sound. On top of this if the original Bob Heis 8mm footage can be sourced along with the footage by that European arty film director with the, hopefully post production, camera blur and double images removed that would also be stunning footage albeit silent. The madison square garden internal video system probably only showed it live to VIP's watching and didn't record but who knows?

_________________
Vegas Nights


They are doable for other artists because we are asking for much more than for other artists. The Chuck Berry disc which you talk about may contain 53 minutes of rehearsal footage, but is that filmed from one camera of half a dozen? What was it shot on? Who owns the footage? When was it shot? If it is all from one camera, for example, then that's going to cost 20% of that shot with 5 cameras. With regards to the MSG footage, we are talking of 20 minutes of footage that doesn't belong to a studio, so can be bought relatively cheaply. And only 20 minutes to restore.

I don't know the whys and wherefores of the various projects that you mention, but there must be factors at play in those that are different to the ones here or they wouldn't be released. For example, the question of the Queen concert. If this is just the film restored then they have done no more for that than they have already done for EOT. But we are asking for original film stock to be returned to and edited and assembled from scratch - whch is very different from restoring a 90 minute completed film.

I confess that I fail to see why the footage already assembled for The Lost Performances wasn't included in the release we have of EOT - and footage was probably discarded for that project after restoration was completed, and as songs came in and out of the final edit. So with a little bit of work there were obviously extra performances that could have been included on the release we have of EOT but for some reason were not.

But my posts haven't been to put down ideas (except the barmy ones), but to show the kind of financial hurdles that Warner would face in doing a multi-disc set of these concerts, for example, and how much higher these costs are than what some fans assume. It stiill boils down to the fact that if Warner were sitting on a goldmine with these tapes, they would be out there. We are not talking of epic issues with rights etc in the same way that, for example, prevents the 1950s film of Porgy and Bess from being released. The rights belong to Warner. We know the footage is there (it was used for The Lost Performances).

Re: Time Warner and Elvis On Tour

Sun Nov 11, 2012 11:30 am

I know that EPE had not the rights on EOT. But they can pay Time Warner 3 or 5 million dollars to do the project. They have enough money. And as I said before, it's a once in a lifetime event.

Re: Time Warner and Elvis On Tour

Sun Nov 11, 2012 12:36 pm

sadly I think the only way we will ever see special editions of TTWII and EOT anytime soon will be if EPE buys the rights. And I don't think that will happen as Warner's seem to want to hang on to it. Presumably, because they do intend to use it a some point.

I have a sneeking feeling that we will in the end see a joint Project between EPE, Warner and Sony but we may have to wait until the 50th anniversary!

Jamie

:(

Re: Time Warner and Elvis On Tour

Sun Nov 11, 2012 4:02 pm

jurasic1968 wrote:I know that EPE had not the rights on EOT. But they can pay Time Warner 3 or 5 million dollars to do the project. They have enough money. And as I said before, it's a once in a lifetime event.


Lunacy.

Re: Time Warner and Elvis On Tour

Sun Nov 11, 2012 4:35 pm

If any of us get to live to see another 8-10 years, here's what I hope would happen, provided EPE won't bend over and buy the footage or at least even lease them...

Since Warner is huge on anniversaries, one would assume that in 2020, Warner will release a Golden Anniversary Edition 3 DVD/BD set of TTWII....the biggest window of opportunity, imho.

And of course in 2022, Warner will release a Golden Anniversary Edition 3 DVD/BD set of EOT.

Wishful thinking, yes..., but logical.

Re: Time Warner and Elvis On Tour

Sun Nov 11, 2012 5:06 pm

Prince from another planet is testing the water hopefully it does even better than what they expected maybe then the minds at Turner will start to Boggle :)

I would love to track down the cameraman that worked on Elvis On Tour how many of them would still be alive ?

would have some fantastic details to share i'm sure

Re: Time Warner and Elvis On Tour

Sun Nov 11, 2012 5:35 pm

TCB-FAN wrote:If any of us get to live to see another 8-10 years, here's what I hope would happen, provided EPE won't bend over and buy the footage or at least even lease them...

Since Warner is huge on anniversaries, one would assume that in 2020, Warner will release a Golden Anniversary Edition 3 DVD/BD set of TTWII....the biggest window of opportunity, imho.

And of course in 2022, Warner will release a Golden Anniversary Edition 3 DVD/BD set of EOT.

Wishful thinking, yes..., but logical.


i ink we can probably assume that dvd will have been fully-replaced by blu-ray by this point. I'm not sure that anniversaries of the films themselves would be the big selling point - those dates are only big within the eyes of fans, not the general public.

Elvis's 80th birthday in 2015 is a more likely anniversary to tie all this in with - his 80th birthday is a far bigger deal that this year's 35th anniverary of his death and, just like Cash's this year, is likely to create alot of Elvis-related publicity and, no doubt, a torrent of releases/re-releases from Sony. To jump on that wave of publicity, and thus draw in the casual fan, is certainly a possibility for Warner.

Re: Time Warner and Elvis On Tour

Sun Nov 11, 2012 6:29 pm

For those that think the release of Aloha and the 68 Comeback special on DVD nearly a decade ago is proof that the On Tour material is a surefire winner for Warner.

Michael Jackson's This Is It was released just three years ago and was a huge success. Today I went into poundland, and brand new copies of the blu-ray are in there for £1.

Re: Time Warner and Elvis On Tour

Mon Nov 12, 2012 2:40 pm

I still think the aspect ratio will be an issue putting this to blu ray

Also isn't there a Law about changing a movie or parts of it ?
what they did with the Intro to Johnny B Goode is Film Murder......

That intro sets the tone to the whole eperience Elvis On Tour

Like changing the intro for TTWII how dare they :evil:

Re: Time Warner and Elvis On Tour

Mon Nov 12, 2012 3:25 pm

OnTourCam wrote:I still think the aspect ratio will be an issue putting this to blu ray

Also isn't there a Law about changing a movie or parts of it ?
what they did with the Intro to Johnny B Goode is Film Murder......

That intro sets the tone to the whole eperience Elvis On Tour

Like changing the intro for TTWII how dare they :evil:


Aspect ratio wouldn't be a problem. Why would it be?

Re: Time Warner and Elvis On Tour

Tue Nov 13, 2012 3:21 am

It's galling that copyright issues are keeping the original, Johnny B Goode introduction from being used on Elvis On Tour, but if the merits of Warner Bros. Blu-ray release of this film can be appreciated, there's much to lavish praise upon. This release looks splendid in HD. And Warners have certainly spent on affording a strong restoration that's cinematic and - surely - true to what was originally seen in cinemas.

As PMP has been stating repeatedly, and as I have also mentioned in the past, restoration of film, remastering of footage and transferring to HD is a very costly venture. I've read that a million dollars was spent on the restoration and re-editing of the special edition of That's the Way it Is -- and it may be that an underwhelming response to this release continues to hold reservations for a similar On Tour project and a transfer of TTWII to HD. Furthermore, it seems as though the On Tour Blu-ray was hardly embraced. And how much did this release cost to produce?! Several hundred thousand dollars, I would presume -- not to mention what was additionally spent on the excellent Blu-ray releases of Jailhouse Rock and Viva Las Vegas. Both, in my opinion, are among the finest Elvis releases of any type, EVER. Yet, they barely find mention here.

I'd certainly welcome a special edition of Elvis On Tour, and would like to see, not only That's the Way it Is on Blu-ray, but all of Elvis's feature films. But, Elvis aside, there remains hundreds of good, great and classic movies not yet on Blu-ray -- and although there are only three Elvis's Blu-ray releases thus far, this remains more than many other actors. Errol Flynn and James Cagney, for example, have only one Blu-ray release each at the moment. Which is little consolation to anyone craving more from Warner Bros., MGM, Fox and Paramount regarding Elvis. Still, On Tour is in safe hands and if anyone is able and capable of doing something special with this film, it's Warner Bros. When this will be done is another question entirely, but anyone wanting a superb presentation of Elvis On Tour should haste to purchase the current Blu-ray release.

Re: Time Warner and Elvis On Tour

Tue Nov 13, 2012 10:01 am

greystoke wrote:It's galling that copyright issues are keeping the original, Johnny B Goode introduction from being used on Elvis On Tour ...

This reasoning has been bandied about for over two years, but we have yet to see even a single verification of this from an official source. Do you have one?

Re: Time Warner and Elvis On Tour

Tue Nov 13, 2012 10:24 am

drjohncarpenter wrote:
greystoke wrote:It's galling that copyright issues are keeping the original, Johnny B Goode introduction from being used on Elvis On Tour ...

This reasoning has been bandied about for over two years, but we have yet to see even a single verification of this from an official source. Do you have one?


I don't. But why else would the film's opening be altered? Such has clearly been the general consensus any time this release has been discussed, and if Warner Bros. were interested in offering a new edit of On Tour, this surely wouldn't have extended to the opening credits alone. And we know that copyright issues have previously been imposed upon other Elvis releases, so this wouldn't be a precedent. Still, this doesn't make the current Blu-ray release worthless, even if the integrity of the original narrative is compromised -- you may not agree, but it could be a long time before we see another HD release of this particular film. And what we have is, otherwise, very good.