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Re: "Love Me" - Obscure 1954 Billy Williams influence

Thu Nov 01, 2012 7:51 pm

Jaime1234 wrote:It may be terrific, a nice listen, something one wishes to hear, at least once, but it's still dull and especially unimportant.

Thanks for sharing your corner-case opinion twice.

If you have anything positive to add to this insightful topic, please don't hold back.

Re: "Love Me" - Obscure 1954 Billy Williams influence

Thu Nov 01, 2012 11:11 pm

Great topic...LOL

Re: "Love Me" - Obscure 1954 Billy Williams influence

Mon Nov 05, 2012 3:02 pm

Jaime1234 wrote:Great topic...

Thanks!

Re: "Love Me" - Obscure 1954 Billy Williams influence

Mon Nov 05, 2012 4:32 pm

Enjoyable topic.

It's nice to get back to Elvis' masterful '56 version - it's easy to forget how strong and heartfelt a performance it was after the dozens of atrocious live versions we've had from the later years.

Re: "Love Me" - Obscure 1954 Billy Williams influence

Mon Nov 05, 2012 11:12 pm

The last truly great live performances were done in June 1968.

Re: "Love Me" - Obscure 1954 Billy Williams influence

Thu Nov 08, 2012 1:47 am

londonflash wrote:Enjoyable topic.

It's nice to get back to Elvis' masterful '56 version - it's easy to forget how strong and heartfelt a performance it was after the dozens of atrocious live versions we've had from the later years.

So right, londonflash. Thanks for your kind words too.

It's worth mentioning [and as I alluded to in my opening post], Billy Williams also achieved a notable solo success, when waxing arguably the definitive recording [a cover at that] of the classic I'm Gonna Sit Right Down and Write Myself a Letter in 1957.

There's perhaps just a hint of Presley-esque swagger to his peppy vocal, which is kind of ironic when one listens to Elvis' Williams inspired phrasing of Love Me.


phpBB [video]


I'm Gonna Sit Right Down and Write Myself A Letter - Billy Williams (Coral 9-61830)

"Oh, Yeah!"

Re: "Love Me" - Obscure 1954 Billy Williams influence

Thu Nov 08, 2012 7:52 am

Nice topic on one of the great recordings (and in '68, one of the greatest performances). Thanks.

Yes, clearly, he was going from this recording, but he took it to another level entirely.

Been listening to various versions. So far, I haven't heard a "country" spoof. It doesn't sound like a spoof at all.

This one is interesting.

phpBB [video]



The guitar work, and portions of the arrangement, suggests perhaps he heard it, perhaps. The ending . . .

rjm

Re: "Love Me" - Obscure 1954 Billy Williams influence

Fri Nov 09, 2012 9:34 pm

rjm wrote:Nice topic on one of the great recordings (and in '68, one of the greatest performances). Thanks.

My pleasure, rjm.

Below you will find a tighter edit of Love Me from the first '68 sit down show [the self-deprecating "crying over you" line ("Err!") he doesn't quite hit is removed/replaced].

Whilst still raw and rough around the edges, it does reveal the new super-cool texture and maturity his voice took on at this point; and not to mention Scotty's simple but oh-so-effective bluesy guitar runs and fills [he plays a more concealed acoustic on the faster later performance].

Love Me ('68 edit)
http://www21.zippyshare.com/v/51368425/file.html

Re: "Love Me" - Obscure 1954 Billy Williams influence

Sat Nov 10, 2012 9:09 am

elvisalisellers wrote:
rjm wrote:Nice topic on one of the great recordings (and in '68, one of the greatest performances). Thanks.

My pleasure, rjm.

Below you will find a tighter edit of Love Me from the first '68 sit down show [the self-deprecating "crying over you" line ("Err!") he doesn't quite hit is removed/replaced].

Whilst still raw and rough around the edges, it does reveal the new super-cool texture and maturity his voice took on at this point; and not to mention Scotty's simple but oh-so-effective bluesy guitar runs and fills [he plays a more concealed acoustic on the faster later performance].

Love Me ('68 edit)
http://www21.zippyshare.com/v/51368425/file.html


Wow, that was smooth! I could "hear" where the "ehh" was, in my mind, but it vanished without a trace! Neat. Wish I could do that; I've been working with Gold Wave, and it takes some experience, and sweat . . . thank you very much!

Yes, that guitar adds to the super slinky-sexy vocal, which in '68, became ultra-bluesy. It's what I liked about that version I posted: the slinky aspect (particularly with the guitar licks). Elvis just sort of melded everything together in both the original, and in this marvelous performance.

And I love zippyshare! (Why can't they ALL be like zippyshare?)

rjm

Re: "Love Me" - Obscure 1954 Billy Williams influence

Sat Nov 10, 2012 9:01 pm

elvisalisellers wrote:
rjm wrote:Nice topic on one of the great recordings (and in '68, one of the greatest performances). Thanks.

My pleasure, rjm.

Below you will find a tighter edit of Love Me from the first '68 sit down show [the self-deprecating "crying over you" line ("Err!") he doesn't quite hit is removed/replaced].

Whilst still raw and rough around the edges, it does reveal the new super-cool texture and maturity his voice took on at this point; and not to mention Scotty's simple but oh-so-effective bluesy guitar runs and fills [he plays a more concealed acoustic on the faster later performance].

Love Me ('68 edit)
http://www21.zippyshare.com/v/51368425/file.html

I don't mind the unfettered performance, but the main thing about both June 27, 1968 versions of "Love Me" is the PASSION is all there. It makes a world of difference. Even by August 1970, and the lovely version we have from the midnight show on August 12, he is distancing himself from the song with self-reverential humour. And that distance would grow greater, far greater, in the '70s.

Re: "Love Me" - Obscure 1954 Billy Williams influence

Tue Nov 13, 2012 3:40 am

rjm wrote:So far, I haven't heard a "country" spoof. It doesn't sound like a spoof at all.rjm

The spoofing was primarily in the lyric. I don't think anyone ever recorded it with the same satirical intent that Jerry Leiber brought to lines like, "Break my faithful heart/tear it all apart/but love me." He was aiming for over-the-top; apparently, the shot went over everyone's heads.

(Incidentally, my mother once told me that when she first heard "Love Me," she thought it was so inane that she said, "I'd like to meet the idiot who wrote that song!" She did—and she married him. It may have helped that she met the composer.)

rjm wrote:This one is interesting. The guitar work, and portions of the arrangement, suggests perhaps he heard it, perhaps. The ending . . .rjm

That cover, like the Willy & Ruth original, was produced by Leiber & Stoller.