Chat talk and light discussion

translation topic

Sun Dec 18, 2011 10:06 pm

hello

to all of you who needs a serious translation
i can help or try for french-english

only condition don't be hurry 8)

Re: translation topic

Wed Apr 11, 2012 8:23 pm

hi
i was wondering, for what kind of things, do you generally use the word "hulk" ?
( i'm not talking of the tv serie )

Re: translation topic

Wed Apr 11, 2012 9:13 pm

The word "hulk" would generally be used to describe something or someone large. An abandoned ship was once described as a hulk, but now it's typically a large person like The Incredible Hulk or Hulk Hogan.

Re: translation topic

Thu Apr 12, 2012 9:48 pm

i don't get the difference between "wreck" and "hulk".
I guess "hulk" is a pejorative word ....

Re: translation topic

Thu Apr 12, 2012 10:38 pm

tcb4 wrote:i don't get the difference between "wreck" and "hulk".
I guess "hulk" is a pejorative word ....


There's no great difference in that sense, but hulk can be used in different ways, e.g. to hulk something is to move something heavy. Whilst to wreck something is to damage or break it. If you think of hulk relating to something large, heavy and also slow-moving if fitting the other criteria of size and weight. But not necessarily in a pejorative sense, if at all.

Re: translation topic

Thu Apr 12, 2012 10:58 pm

thank you for your explanation greystoke :!:

Re: translation topic

Thu Apr 12, 2012 11:18 pm

tcb4 wrote:thank you for your explanation greystoke :!:


You're welcome.

Re: translation topic

Tue May 01, 2012 9:01 pm

hello

anyone can say what means "mercy" "or lord has mercy" in songs ?

Re: translation topic

Tue May 01, 2012 10:04 pm

tcb4 wrote:hello

anyone can say what means "mercy" "or lord has mercy" in songs ?


It's a turn of phrase that suggests being under the power of something or someone -- like a pretty woman in the song Pretty Woman. The singer is overwhelmed by her and exclaims "mercy" to suggest this.

Re: translation topic

Tue May 01, 2012 10:17 pm

greystoke wrote:
tcb4 wrote:hello

anyone can say what means "mercy" "or lord has mercy" in songs ?


It's a turn of phrase that suggests being under the power of something or someone -- like a pretty woman in the song Pretty Woman. The singer is overwhelmed by her and exclaims "mercy" to suggest this.


could you give a synonym ?

Re: translation topic

Wed May 02, 2012 12:35 am

tcb4 wrote:
greystoke wrote:
tcb4 wrote:hello

anyone can say what means "mercy" "or lord has mercy" in songs ?


It's a turn of phrase that suggests being under the power of something or someone -- like a pretty woman in the song Pretty Woman. The singer is overwhelmed by her and exclaims "mercy" to suggest this.


could you give a synonym ?


There are synonyms for the word "mercy," but as a turn of phrase they don't translate the same. So "mercy" or "have mercy" as used as an exclamation in a song is more about a feeling than semantics. So "have mercy" in Pretty Woman could be the same as saying "wow!" or being amazed.

Re: translation topic

Wed May 02, 2012 9:23 am

greystoke wrote:
tcb4 wrote:
greystoke wrote:
tcb4 wrote:hello

anyone can say what means "mercy" "or lord has mercy" in songs ?


It's a turn of phrase that suggests being under the power of something or someone -- like a pretty woman in the song Pretty Woman. The singer is overwhelmed by her and exclaims "mercy" to suggest this.


could you give a synonym ?


There are synonyms for the word "mercy," but as a turn of phrase they don't translate the same. So "mercy" or "have mercy" as used as an exclamation in a song is more about a feeling than semantics. So "have mercy" in Pretty Woman could be the same as saying "wow!" or being amazed.


I'll take a whack at this one. "Lord, have mercy." Literally, one is asking for the Lord, God, to be merciful -- to go easy on a person because they feel a need to ask for such "mercy." When people are suffering, they cry out to God for mercy, but this is not that kind of "suffering." Now, why would Roy Orbison ask for "mercy" just because he saw a "pretty woman." It seems a bit odd, I guess, but it can be connected. And is really quite interesting.

It's like when an Elvis fan (often female, or any person oriented toward an interest in males) says of a gorgeous photo of him "oh, have mercy! He's so gorgeous; I might pass out!" And that's it right there. Roy is so overwhelmed (as you pointed out, Greystoke) by the woman, that he's afraid he just can't handle it, might collapse (not literally, but he feels a LOT of feelings that are difficult). And so he cries for "mercy." For "help." For relief. For The One more powerful to take mercy on him, because he's not in control any more. Since judges say "may God have Mercy on your soul" on passing a death sentence, there may be an element of guilt in the expression. Not serious guilt, but kind of "a little guilt" because maybe you're feeling something that others would frown upon. It doesn't have to be sensual attraction: you can hear a guitar solo and say "mercy!" because it's so great, and you are so excited, that you might need assistance. When you hear the sound of "Layla," you might well cry out for "Mercy!" Or whatever it is that gets a person SO excited that they need "mercy" or some kind of help, or even exculpation of guilt over their strong feelings.

I don't think it would be in a translation program or dictionary, so it's a really good question. There are interesting French words that resist translation. And one in particular is related to the question about "have mercy!" Some have translated "jouissance" as bliss - or really blissful enjoying, when it really ought to be translated as "rapture." And really, no English word get it right. It does have a sexual connotation, but is not restricted to that at all, and has been used to describe rapturous music as no other word can quite capture it. Certainly no English word. I think of one record: "Christmas, Baby Please Come Home." That French word describes what you feel. It's not actually sexual, yet not merely enjoyment. It's jouissance that you experience.

The connection? When you experience jouissance, the only English thing you can really say is "Lawd, Have Mercy!" (I hope the little bit of French I know, and it's really a very little bit, helped. It comes around in a lot of French linguistic theory, so I know about that one, and wrote about it, when writing about musical experience. Roland Barthes was very interested in the concept when talking about music, especially singing voices. He spoke of "the grain of the voice" as being able to create the experience of jouissance. Some voices could do that, and some could not. Simon Frith wrote about it a long time ago, and used Elvis as an example.)

When you hear a devastating musical performance, and cry out "Lawd, Have Mercy!" you may have experienced jouissance. I think Roy Orbison did, in that song. That was the one with the growl, right?

Whenever this comes on the radio, I turn it up real loud, and I think "Lord Have Mercy!" (And the lyrics explain a little bit of it, too. But the sound, the sound!)

phpBB [video]



(footnote: when I pronounce "Barthes" aloud, I sound like Inspector Clouseau, so I try not to do that! :D )

rjm

Re: translation topic

Wed May 02, 2012 4:48 pm

thank you rjm & greystoke

in france we would say "wow" too !

it's true that some words can't be translated .....

Re: translation topic

Tue Jun 05, 2012 9:01 pm

any italian people who can translate this ?

Il film è il remake in chiave musicarello di una pellicola austriaca del 1933, Leise flehen meine Lieder, diretta da Willi Forst.
Trama > In seguito ad un episodio avvenuto in casa della principessa Vorokin, il compositore rimane infastidito da un gesto della contessina Anna Roskoff, perdendo il suo posto di insegnante...

Re: translation topic

Thu Jun 14, 2012 9:48 pm

The movie is a musical remake of a 1933 Austrian filmed called Leise flehen meine Lieder directed by Will Forst.

Plot> Following an incident at the home of Princess Vorokin, the composer remains bothered by a gesture of Countess Anna Roskoff, losing his teaching job ...



I dont speak Italian but it is pretty close to Spanish in a way ..

Re: translation topic

Mon Jun 18, 2012 11:09 pm

thank you very much francesc 8)

Re: translation topic

Mon Aug 27, 2012 8:08 pm

octopussy >> the famous james bond movie

i saw the movie and the bonus and they all laugh of the title
is it just because there is 'pussy' in it, or because octopussy means sth else ?

thanx

Re: translation topic

Mon Aug 27, 2012 9:16 pm

tcb4 wrote:octopussy >> the famous james bond movie

i saw the movie and the bonus and they all laugh of the title
is it just because there is 'pussy' in it, or because octopussy means sth else ?

thanx


Partly, Bond films and stories being known for sexual innuendo, double entendres and obvious connotations. Ian Fleming, however, owned a coracle called Octopussy, and named the short story, Octopussy, after this. He also had a pet octopus, as did Maud Adams (Octopussy) in the film -- her "little octopussy," as she mentions at one point. An affectionate term laden with much of the aforementioned innuendo. A fine entry in the Bond series, though. One of my favourites. I'm looking forward to the forthcoming Blu-ray box set and Roger Moore's new book, Bond on Bond.
Last edited by greystoke on Mon Aug 27, 2012 9:32 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Re: translation topic

Mon Aug 27, 2012 9:29 pm

thanx

the bonus are so funny 8)

Re: translation topic

Fri Aug 31, 2012 3:59 pm

Francesc wrote:The movie is a musical remake of a 1933 Austrian filmed called Leise flehen meine Lieder directed by Will Forst.

Plot> Following an incident at the home of Princess Vorokin, the composer remains bothered by a gesture of Countess Anna Roskoff, losing his teaching job ...

I dont speak Italian but it is pretty close to Spanish in a way ..


Yes, a close translation.
I would have used 'is irritated by something that the Countess Anna Roskoff does' instead of 'remains bothered by a gesture', which is a literal translation, and doesn't work.

Un gesto can mean an actual gesture, but it can also mean, as in this case, someone doing something (like opening a door for a lady, for example).

Re: translation topic

Fri Aug 31, 2012 10:37 pm

thanx Jane if by chance, you have the time to translate this
you'd be nice !

Che angelo sei se voli e non vuoi lasciarmi volare.
Che angelo sei se canti e non vuoi lasciarmi cantare.
Che senso ha un sorriso che sa di http://lyricstranslate.com paradiso
se paradiso poi non e.

Re: translation topic

Sat Sep 01, 2012 2:47 am

tcb4 wrote:thanx Jane if by chance, you have the time to translate this
you'd be nice !

Che angelo sei se voli e non vuoi lasciarmi volare.
Che angelo sei se canti e non vuoi lasciarmi cantare.
Che senso ha un sorriso che sa di http://lyricstranslate.com paradiso
se paradiso poi non e.


This is another occasion where a literal translation would be pointless. My best shot:

What sort of angel are you that flies but won't let me fly?
What sort of angel are you that sings but won't let me sing?
What is the point of a smile that hints at paradise if it then isn't paradise?


It's hard to get a perfect translation on this sort of thing though.

Re: translation topic

Sat Sep 01, 2012 12:46 pm

thank you so much, Jane !
i wonder if you know this beautiful song ?

Re: translation topic

Sun Sep 02, 2012 2:08 am

I didn't but I do now.
Al Bano and Romina Power, or Al Bano on his own now. I can only take them in small amounts, and only some of their songs.
Nice couple, pity they split up but people change in time.
I think they are both happy now with their own lives.

Re: translation topic

Mon Jan 07, 2013 12:14 am

what means in spanish ?

the saying ' a esa'
if you know the song 'A esa, que te aparta de mí'