Chat talk and light discussion

Re: last movie you watched

Thu Apr 03, 2014 3:53 pm

greystoke wrote:
keninlincs wrote:Last night we went and watched"Twenty Feet From Stardom"a fascinating look at backing singers such as Darlene Love,a great documentary and featuring some fine performances from stars like,Springsteen,Rolling Stones and more . Definitely worth the price of admission

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This looks like a great film, Ken. I may seem it tomorrow or Friday, if possible.

I was engrossed from start to finish

Re: last movie you watched

Thu Apr 03, 2014 5:29 pm

keninlincs wrote:
greystoke wrote:
keninlincs wrote:Last night we went and watched"Twenty Feet From Stardom"a fascinating look at backing singers such as Darlene Love,a great documentary and featuring some fine performances from stars like,Springsteen,Rolling Stones and more . Definitely worth the price of admission

mobile reply


This looks like a great film, Ken. I may seem it tomorrow or Friday, if possible.

I was engrossed from start to finish


I've been reading that Toni Braxton is to play Darlene Love in a biopic of the singer's life. Which could be interesting, although it seems as though Twenty Feet From Stardom focuses quite a bit on Love. Braxton hasn't acted much at all, but she's a fine singer and will be capable with regards to the music. Perhaps one to watch out for, Ken.

Re: last movie you watched

Thu Apr 03, 2014 6:13 pm

greystoke wrote:
keninlincs wrote:
greystoke wrote:
keninlincs wrote:Last night we went and watched"Twenty Feet From Stardom"a fascinating look at backing singers such as Darlene Love,a great documentary and featuring some fine performances from stars like,Springsteen,Rolling Stones and more . Definitely worth the price of admission

mobile reply


This looks like a great film, Ken. I may seem it tomorrow or Friday, if possible.

I was engrossed from start to finish


I've been reading that Toni Braxton is to play Darlene Love in a biopic of the singer's life. Which could be interesting, although it seems as though Twenty Feet From Stardom focuses quite a bit on Love. Braxton hasn't acted much at all, but she's a fine singer and will be capable with regards to the music. Perhaps one to watch out for, Ken.

i will look out for that,thanks

Re: last movie you watched

Mon Apr 07, 2014 2:13 pm

Last night I watched the french comedy "Paulette" and enjoyed it. Nice little flick.

Re: last movie you watched

Mon Apr 07, 2014 2:30 pm

Watched Red 2 last night what a lot of crap ! what were all these great actors thinking about when they read the script for this movie !!!

Re: last movie you watched

Wed Apr 09, 2014 12:38 pm

Last night I watched "Mulholland Drive" by David Lynch for the 4th time. Fantastic acting performances (well, ummm, maybe except for Billy Ray Cyrus' part) and every scene is very well crafted. Love it.

Re: last movie you watched

Wed Apr 09, 2014 3:55 pm

luckyjackson1 wrote:Last night I watched "Mulholland Drive" by David Lynch for the 4th time. Fantastic acting performances (well, ummm, maybe except for Billy Ray Cyrus' part) and every scene is very well crafted. Love it.


Mulholland Drive is a superb movie -- I've watched it several times myself. I think it's one of David Lynch's best films.

Re: last movie you watched

Sat Apr 12, 2014 11:01 am

After thinking it over I finally went to the local cinema last night to see Mark Wahlberg starring in Peter Berg's "Lone Survivor".
When I read what the movie was about I had my doubts because I left the cinema when I watched "Zero Dark Thirty". AND starring Taylor Kitsch and Emile Hirsch it gave me another two reasons not wanting to watch it.
But then there are Wahlberg and one of my favourite actors, Ben Foster. So I finally changed my mind.

I didn't particularly care for the story or the army pathos. I even thought at one point this movie was more politically incorrect then "The Green Berets"... :o

Aside from being too monotonous from time to time and slow paced at the beginning I enjoyed the (somehow fascinating) action scenes although I couldn't help but wonder if Berg was trying to imitate Paul Greengrass' style (shaking camera and even worse: close-ups, zooming AND shaking). And I think Howard Berger and Gregory Nicotero did a marvellous job again. :wink:

Overall I'd rate it five out of ten for the reasons mentioned above.

Re: last movie you watched

Sun Apr 13, 2014 6:08 pm

Hachi : A Dog's Tale
(2009) Richard Gere, Joan Allen


Based on a true story about a very loyal dog and his master. A real tear-jerker. :cry: :cry: :cry:

A puppy (A Corgi) is sent from Japan to the United States, but escapes when his cage falls off the baggage cart at an American train station. Professor Parker Wilson finds the abandoned dog and when the station controller refuses to take the puppy, he takes it home with the intention of returning the animal to its owner. Initially, Cate Parker does not want them to keep the puppy. Parker learns that the dog is an Akita. The dog has not been claimed when he returns to the station the following morning, so he takes him to the college, where Ken, a Japanese professor, suggests that perhaps the two are meant to be together. He translates the symbol on the collar as 'Hachi'—Japanese for the number 8—signifying good fortune. Parker decides to call the dog Hachikō. Parker attempts to play fetch with Hachi, but he refuses to join in. Cate receives a call from someone wishing to adopt the puppy, but having seen how close her husband is with Hachi, she tells the caller, "Hachi has already been spoken for."

Parker contiues to be mystified by Hachi's refusal to do dog-like activities like chase and fetch. One morning, Parker leaves for work and Hachi follows him to the train station; he refuses to leave until Parker walks him home. Later in the afternoon, Hachi walks to the train station, to wait patiently for Parker to come home. Parker relents and walks Hachi to the station every morning. After Parker's train departs, Hachi walks home, returning in the afternoon to see his master's train arrive and go home together. They continue to do this every day.

One day Parker gets ready to leave and Hachi barks at him and refuses to join him. When Parker does leave, Hachi chases him while holding his ball. Parker is surprised but pleased that Hachi is finally willing to play fetch the ball with him. Not wishing to be late for college, Parker catches his train despite Hachi's barking. Later that day Parker is teaching his music class, still holding Hachi's ball, when he suddenly suffers a fatal heart attack and dies.

At the train station, Hachi waits patiently as the train arrives, but there is no sign of Parker. He remains, lying in the snow, for several hours, until Parker's son-in-law Michael (Ronnie Sublett) comes to collect him. The next day, Hachi returns to the station and waits, remaining all day and all night. As time passes, Cate sells the house and Hachi is sent to live with her daughter Andy (Sarah Roemer), Michael, and their baby Ronnie. However, at the first opportunity, he escapes and eventually finds his way back to his old house and then to the train station, where he sits at his usual spot, eating hot dogs given to him by Jasjeet, a local vendor. Andy arrives soon after and takes him home, but lets him out the next day to return to the station.

For the next ten years, Hachi waits for his owner. His loyalty is profiled in the local newspaper. Ten years after Parker's death, Cate comes back to visit Parker's grave where she meets Ken, and she says that even though it has been a decade, she still misses him. Arriving at the station, she is stunned to see Hachi, old, dirty and weak, still maintaining his vigil. Overcome with grief, Cate sits and waits for the next train with him. At home, Cate tells the now ten-year-old Ronnie about Hachi.

After more than ten long years of waiting faithfully for his dead master, Hachiko, now old and weary, limps to the same spot in front of the railway station where he had waited faithfully every day. As people walk through the station exit he recollects those joyful moments of his life that he had spent with his master. Now alone, lying on the snow with his eyes closed, he remembers Parker emerging from the station and the two happily greeting each other....



Image

Re: last movie you watched

Sun Apr 13, 2014 8:52 pm

TCB-FAN wrote:Hachi : A Dog's Tale
(2009) Richard Gere, Joan Allen


Based on a true story about a very loyal dog and his master. A real tear-jerker. :cry: :cry: :cry:

A puppy (A Corgi) is sent from Japan to the United States, but escapes when his cage falls off the baggage cart at an American train station. Professor Parker Wilson finds the abandoned dog and when the station controller refuses to take the puppy, he takes it home with the intention of returning the animal to its owner. Initially, Cate Parker does not want them to keep the puppy. Parker learns that the dog is an Akita. The dog has not been claimed when he returns to the station the following morning, so he takes him to the college, where Ken, a Japanese professor, suggests that perhaps the two are meant to be together. He translates the symbol on the collar as 'Hachi'—Japanese for the number 8—signifying good fortune. Parker decides to call the dog Hachikō. Parker attempts to play fetch with Hachi, but he refuses to join in. Cate receives a call from someone wishing to adopt the puppy, but having seen how close her husband is with Hachi, she tells the caller, "Hachi has already been spoken for."

Parker contiues to be mystified by Hachi's refusal to do dog-like activities like chase and fetch. One morning, Parker leaves for work and Hachi follows him to the train station; he refuses to leave until Parker walks him home. Later in the afternoon, Hachi walks to the train station, to wait patiently for Parker to come home. Parker relents and walks Hachi to the station every morning. After Parker's train departs, Hachi walks home, returning in the afternoon to see his master's train arrive and go home together. They continue to do this every day.

One day Parker gets ready to leave and Hachi barks at him and refuses to join him. When Parker does leave, Hachi chases him while holding his ball. Parker is surprised but pleased that Hachi is finally willing to play fetch the ball with him. Not wishing to be late for college, Parker catches his train despite Hachi's barking. Later that day Parker is teaching his music class, still holding Hachi's ball, when he suddenly suffers a fatal heart attack and dies.

At the train station, Hachi waits patiently as the train arrives, but there is no sign of Parker. He remains, lying in the snow, for several hours, until Parker's son-in-law Michael (Ronnie Sublett) comes to collect him. The next day, Hachi returns to the station and waits, remaining all day and all night. As time passes, Cate sells the house and Hachi is sent to live with her daughter Andy (Sarah Roemer), Michael, and their baby Ronnie. However, at the first opportunity, he escapes and eventually finds his way back to his old house and then to the train station, where he sits at his usual spot, eating hot dogs given to him by Jasjeet, a local vendor. Andy arrives soon after and takes him home, but lets him out the next day to return to the station.

For the next ten years, Hachi waits for his owner. His loyalty is profiled in the local newspaper. Ten years after Parker's death, Cate comes back to visit Parker's grave where she meets Ken, and she says that even though it has been a decade, she still misses him. Arriving at the station, she is stunned to see Hachi, old, dirty and weak, still maintaining his vigil. Overcome with grief, Cate sits and waits for the next train with him. At home, Cate tells the now ten-year-old Ronnie about Hachi.

After more than ten long years of waiting faithfully for his dead master, Hachiko, now old and weary, limps to the same spot in front of the railway station where he had waited faithfully every day. As people walk through the station exit he recollects those joyful moments of his life that he had spent with his master. Now alone, lying on the snow with his eyes closed, he remembers Parker emerging from the station and the two happily greeting each other....



Image


I really like Lasse Hallstrom's version of Hachi, although I prefer Seijiro Koyama's original, 1987, film, which starred the great Tatsuya Nakadai. The story is essentially the same, of course, and Hallstrom was not only the ideal director for this movie, Richard Gere was perfectly cast in the lead. Gere is the kind of actor who can bring a real sense of truth and sincerity to a film of this nature and to the kind of character he plays here. The dog is the real star, of course, with Hallstrom being no stranger to sets populated with animals. He has such a keen eye and a deft touch, which is paramount with gentle, moving and honest tales like Hachi.

Re: last movie you watched

Sun Apr 13, 2014 8:53 pm

The Grand Budapest Hotel. Fantastic movie. I think this might be my favorite Wes Anderson film. And Ralph Fiennes' performance is outstanding. Visually the film is extremely pleasing.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Grand_Budapest_Hotel

phpBB [video]

Re: last movie you watched

Sun Apr 13, 2014 9:08 pm

InheritTheWind wrote:The Grand Budapest Hotel. Fantastic movie. I think this might be my favorite Wes Anderson film. And Ralph Fiennes' performance is outstanding. Visually the film is extremely pleasing.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Grand_Budapest_Hotel

phpBB [video]



I think The Grand Budapest Hotel is my favourite Wes Anderson film, too. It's a wonderful movie, brimming with invention and quirkiness in the writing, performances, aesthetic and direction. And it's good to see Ralph Fiennes in a rare lighter role -- amidst many Anderson regulars, of course. The plot did remind me a little of It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World, though.

Re: last movie you watched

Sun Apr 13, 2014 10:23 pm

greystoke wrote:
InheritTheWind wrote:The Grand Budapest Hotel. Fantastic movie. I think this might be my favorite Wes Anderson film. And Ralph Fiennes' performance is outstanding. Visually the film is extremely pleasing.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Grand_Budapest_Hotel

phpBB [video]



I think The Grand Budapest Hotel is my favourite Wes Anderson film, too. It's a wonderful movie, brimming with invention and quirkiness in the writing, performances, aesthetic and direction. And it's good to see Ralph Fiennes in a rare lighter role -- amidst many Anderson regulars, of course. The plot did remind me a little of It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World, though.


That's a funny observation, greystoke. I agree. But it's like It's a Mad, Mad, Mad World with a sad undertone.

Re: last movie you watched

Sun Apr 13, 2014 11:11 pm

Saw it last week. Absolutely loved it. It's a mad, mad, mad movie! Go. You'll love it.

rjm

Sent via mobile

Re: last movie you watched

Sun Apr 13, 2014 11:13 pm

Could a film buff help me with something, though. The Grand Budapest I saw was in a 4:3 aspect ratio. In the theater!

What's up with that?

Thank you.

rjm

Sent via mobile

Re: last movie you watched

Mon Apr 14, 2014 3:46 am

rjm wrote:Could a film buff help me with something, though. The Grand Budapest I saw was in a 4:3 aspect ratio. In the theater!

What's up with that?

Thank you.


I loved the fact that Anderson shot the film in three aspect ratios, 1.33, 1.85, and 2.35:1. One for each timeline!

Here's a couple of interesting articles:

http://www.davidbordwell.net/blog/2014/ ... challenge/

http://www.slate.com/blogs/browbeat/201 ... erent.html

Re: last movie you watched

Mon Apr 14, 2014 9:19 am

InheritTheWind wrote:
rjm wrote:Could a film buff help me with something, though. The Grand Budapest I saw was in a 4:3 aspect ratio. In the theater!

What's up with that?

Thank you.


I loved the fact that Anderson shot the film in three aspect ratios, 1.33, 1.85, and 2.35:1. One for each timeline!

Here's a couple of interesting articles:

http://www.davidbordwell.net/blog/2014/ ... challenge/

http://www.slate.com/blogs/browbeat/201 ... erent.html


OH! Well, thank you! :D

rjm

Re: last movie you watched

Mon Apr 14, 2014 3:21 pm

greystoke wrote:
TCB-FAN wrote:Hachi : A Dog's Tale
(2009) Richard Gere, Joan Allen

Image


I really like Lasse Hallstrom's version of Hachi, although I prefer Seijiro Koyama's original, 1987, film, which starred the great Tatsuya Nakadai. The story is essentially the same, of course, and Hallstrom was not only the ideal director for this movie, Richard Gere was perfectly cast in the lead. Gere is the kind of actor who can bring a real sense of truth and sincerity to a film of this nature and to the kind of character he plays here. The dog is the real star, of course, with Hallstrom being no stranger to sets populated with animals. He has such a keen eye and a deft touch, which is paramount with gentle, moving and honest tales like Hachi.



I guess I'm just a sucker for pet movies (especially dogs). I sobbed liked a baby after watching "Marley & Me". I even tear up after watching old Lassie re-runs. :cry:

Re: last movie you watched

Mon Apr 14, 2014 4:30 pm

TCB-FAN wrote:
greystoke wrote:
TCB-FAN wrote:Hachi : A Dog's Tale
(2009) Richard Gere, Joan Allen

Image


I really like Lasse Hallstrom's version of Hachi, although I prefer Seijiro Koyama's original, 1987, film, which starred the great Tatsuya Nakadai. The story is essentially the same, of course, and Hallstrom was not only the ideal director for this movie, Richard Gere was perfectly cast in the lead. Gere is the kind of actor who can bring a real sense of truth and sincerity to a film of this nature and to the kind of character he plays here. The dog is the real star, of course, with Hallstrom being no stranger to sets populated with animals. He has such a keen eye and a deft touch, which is paramount with gentle, moving and honest tales like Hachi.



I guess I'm just a sucker for pet movies (especially dogs). I sobbed liked a baby after watching "Marley & Me". I even tear up after watching old Lassie re-runs. :cry:


You must love Old Yeller, then. I certainly do!

Re: last movie you watched

Tue Apr 15, 2014 12:01 am

greystoke wrote:
TCB-FAN wrote:
greystoke wrote:
TCB-FAN wrote:Hachi : A Dog's Tale
(2009) Richard Gere, Joan Allen

Image


I really like Lasse Hallstrom's version of Hachi, although I prefer Seijiro Koyama's original, 1987, film, which starred the great Tatsuya Nakadai. The story is essentially the same, of course, and Hallstrom was not only the ideal director for this movie, Richard Gere was perfectly cast in the lead. Gere is the kind of actor who can bring a real sense of truth and sincerity to a film of this nature and to the kind of character he plays here. The dog is the real star, of course, with Hallstrom being no stranger to sets populated with animals. He has such a keen eye and a deft touch, which is paramount with gentle, moving and honest tales like Hachi.



I guess I'm just a sucker for pet movies (especially dogs). I sobbed liked a baby after watching "Marley & Me". I even tear up after watching old Lassie re-runs. :cry:


You must love Old Yeller, then. I certainly do!


That too !! Classic. Woof !

Re: last movie you watched

Tue Apr 15, 2014 3:16 am

The Little Mermaid 5/6 , just fantastic , the mood/music....prolly never seen it before , only the series.

Re: last movie you watched

Tue Apr 15, 2014 9:58 am

Thanks for the reviews of "Hachi", absolutely loved it although unfortunately I've never watched the original.

Two nights ago after the third attempt I finally watched "White House Down" in its entirety. The first time I turned it off after thirty minutes and the second time I fell asleep... again after the lame thirty minute-opening. But I have to admit I really enjoyed it. :oops:

Started watching "R.E.D." but somehow the whole story line doesn't make much sense to me (yet). But will continue later.

Also started watching "Deadfall" starring Eric Bana and Olivia Wilde but wasn't in the mood continuing so I turned it off after about ten minutes. Although I was really delighted to see Kris Kristofferson and Sissi Spacek.

But that's me, it's really a "mood thing" with this movies.

I might even enjoy "Lone Survivor" one fine day. :wink:

Re: last movie you watched

Thu Apr 17, 2014 1:38 am

luckyjackson1 wrote:Thanks for the reviews of "Hachi", absolutely loved it although unfortunately I've never watched the original.

Two nights ago after the third attempt I finally watched "White House Down" in its entirety. The first time I turned it off after thirty minutes and the second time I fell asleep... again after the lame thirty minute-opening. But I have to admit I really enjoyed it. :oops:

Started watching "R.E.D." but somehow the whole story line doesn't make much sense to me (yet). But will continue later.

Also started watching "Deadfall" starring Eric Bana and Olivia Wilde but wasn't in the mood continuing so I turned it off after about ten minutes. Although I was really delighted to see Kris Kristofferson and Sissi Spacek.

But that's me, it's really a "mood thing" with this movies.

I might even enjoy "Lone Survivor" one fine day. :wink:


I thought White House Down was mind-numbing Hollywood trash. And I thought it was huuugely entertaining. Mind-numbing trash can be good!

Re: last movie you watched

Thu Apr 17, 2014 1:44 am

I made a very rare trip to the cinema tonight to see The Quiet Ones, and thought it was very average. The big problem with it is that it doesn't really make a great deal of sense, but you don't realise that until it's over. The acting was good - although I did sit there for a while trying to work out where I had seen one of the actresses before (Bates Motel was the answer). However, it was derivative of films such as Sinister and The Conjuring, and it's biggest failing was that I didn't find it remotely creepy or scary. I'm not saying it wasn't entertaining for 100 minutes, because it was - but you leave the cinema with little sense of what the whole thing was really about, and I came home to an empty house which has its fair share of things that go bump in the night and didn't think twice about it. That's not the feeling a good horror film should leave you with.

Re: last movie you watched

Thu Apr 17, 2014 11:29 am

rjm wrote:TCM is having an Oscar month, So I am seeing many classics.

Was stoked to finally see Marty. My dad always loved it. I never saw but just a little piece of it.

It's a brief picture. Didn't expect it to end so abruptly. But perfect in its way.

If you leave aside the dated gender assumptions and the premature aging of everyone, it makes a powerful little message.

When the picture begins, it seems as if Marty is the only unhappy person in his world. By the end, he (and his gal) are the only happy people. Everyone else is not only miserable, but they want to spread around the misery.

Marty escapes. It leaves you feeling good.

But that poor actress must have been ruined by this role! She's portrayed as the ugliest girl in the world. (And she wasn't.)

It was interesting to go back to a time so different from anything I know.

rjm

Sent From My Phabulous Galaxy Note II Phablet Using Tapatalk 4




I watched "Marty" on your recommendation, rjm, thank you. I enjoyed the movie, thoroughly. I also love those old classics, knowing that I am about to feel different, due to being immersed in a film from a different era, it is something I also enjoy.

Betsy Blair, who played Clara, Marty's love interest, was actually one of Gene Kelly's wives. Amazing :D