Chat talk and light discussion

Re: last movie you watched

Sat Jan 25, 2014 3:50 am

I watched the film Elysium tonight with Matt Damon. It has an interesting premise but overall the film seemed a little weak to me. I didn't find myself really liking the characters in the film and that includes Damon. This film was directed by the same guy who did District 9. I consider that a far superior film.
On the plus side, the technical aspects of the Blu-ray Disc are stunning. Video and audio are top notch. Before watching this movie I hooked up my new subwoofer to my home theatre. The results were stunning. The soundtrack to this film could have caused structural damage to the house. My new sub is a beast.
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Re: last movie you watched

Sun Jan 26, 2014 6:30 am

TV show but still, Supernatural for me. Season 4. Good stuff.

Re: last movie you watched

Wed Jan 29, 2014 12:09 am

I saw Grudge Match and Inside Llewyn Davis at the cinema last week. Grudge Match stars Robert De Niro and Sylvester Stallone as two retired boxers whose previous fights ended with one win each, but no deciding fight after Stallone’s character, Henry “Razor” Sharp, decided to retire. He’s now a steelworker, whilst Robert De Niro’s Billy “The Kid” McDonnen is a used car salesman by day and a stand-up comedian by night. The latter, being one of a few nods to both Raging Bull and Rocky. The inevitable transpires in that McDonnen and Sharp are bound to be coaxed into having that final match. Such is the crux of this movie, although a simple story is lost in favour of several plot threads and stale narrative that isn’t helped by a lacklustre script and generally poor direction. Which is a bit of a shame because there was a good movie to be made here; not necessarily something hard-hitting, but funnier and more poignant that what Grudge Match ultimately turned out to be. It doesn’t help matters that it looks like a bit of a mismatch between De Niro and Stallone, but that’s forgivable -- what doesn’t work is the introduction of too many surplus characters and a brand of comedy that never rings true. There is some poignancy to be found, however, and much of that comes from Stallone’s hang-dog expressions and some tender scenes with Kim Basinger. The movie is salvaged somewhat by the fight at the end, which works fairly well, and doesn’t cop out on a finish despite playing by a few rules of its own.

Inside Llewyn Davis is the Coen brothers latest film and tells the story of its titular character and his woes on the Greenwich Village folk scene during a week in 1961. Starring Oscar Isaac as Llewyn Davis, the Coens have fashioned a character whose social inadequacies and inability to communicate are his downfall in life and on the music scene. He’s talented, but despite the kindness of others, remains stuck in a cycle of despair that leads him from one couch to another. Davis is one of the Coen’s more aloof and unlikable central characters; throughout the film he’s rarely inviting and, in the snubs and scowls at his friends and colleagues, he’s difficult to gauge and remains largely impenetrable. This may be a drawback for some, but I found his story to have a strong allure, especially with the Homeric narrative and vibrant undertones that reveal themselves in the way one may become familiar with a new album. The cinematography is quite splendid here also, and is important to mention, because the colour palette and use of browns and greens make this film look like an old album cover. This is also reflected in the framing of some scenes, whilst there’s a certain nod to The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan; something Cameron Crowe also done in Vanilla Sky. In support are Carey Mulligan, Justin Timberlake and John Goodman, all of whom are memorable in small roles -- Mulligan and Timberlake play a singing couple called Jim and Jean, with the smiling and well-liked Jim being very much the antithesis of Davis. Even when Jim isn’t present in the film, he’s spoken about in such a way that it’s easy to appreciate the subtleties of Timberlake’s performance and how it resonates against Isaac’s. Mulligan is more scathing, being almost as harsh as Davis, but with good reason, and although Goodman’s role is small, it’s pivotal given the choices present when Davis is given a touch of his own medicine. Importantly, the music here is quite splendid throughout -- some songs are written and performed with tongue firmly in cheek, such as Please Mr. Kennedy, whilst there’s sincerity present given the quality of the music’s production and the songs having been sung live in every instance bar one. I think Inside Llewyn Davis is one of the Coen brothers finest films to date, which is no mean feat, although it’s not their most accessible and like the central character, there’s depths to be found despite an aloof nature. There’s also a nice nod to Elvis.

Re: last movie you watched

Wed Jan 29, 2014 1:32 am

jak wrote:I watched the film Elysium tonight with Matt Damon. It has an interesting premise


The inspiration for the premise of Elysium and a few other sci-fi films, comes from this real life proposal for future space colonies:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stanford_torus

And if you are wondering if it could really happen, here are a bunch of enthusiasts disscussing such matters. Very interesting, at least I think so.
http://www.reddit.com/r/Futurology/comm ... lly_build/

This place is a bit of a virtual Stanford torus.

Re: last movie you watched

Wed Jan 29, 2014 3:17 pm

Recently saw "Grudge Match",was a bit disappointed with it on the whole but enjoyed the end,and "Inside Lewyn Davis"which i really liked,particularly enjoyed a top performance from John Goodman,that was it for the cinema this week.At the weekend i watched "Filth"which i thought was a cocaine and hooker filled bore of a film,that i watched to the bitter end incase it got better,which it didnt.and then watched "Sunshine OnLeith"which i thought was excellent ,i never realised that i knew so many Proclaimers songs,time to visit Scotland again soon i think(obviously when it is warmer)
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Re: last movie you watched

Wed Jan 29, 2014 8:26 pm

I felt much the same way about Filth, Ken. Not that I have an issue with what the film depicts and how the subject matter was treated; what it fails to do is transcend the coke and drugs and reveal something more in the central character. Danny Boyle achieved this with Train Spotting because he seemed to hold more affection for the characters and bring a genuine understanding of time, place and circumstance. This isn’t achieved in Filth because the greater affection seems to be for the depiction of excess as opposed to the cause and effect. Which is a bit of shame given how good most of the performances are; especially James McAvoy, who is far more convincing here than in Welcome to the Punch or Trance. I did like Sunshine on Leith; it’s twee, but admirably warm and ebullient. The performances are all very good here, too; and the music really worked well. Just as well as ABBA’s songs in Mamma Mia, I thought.

Re: last movie you watched

Wed Jan 29, 2014 11:15 pm

True,I wanted to enjoy filth but there was no depth to it,Macavoy was not used as wel as he could have been

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Re: last movie you watched

Thu Jan 30, 2014 12:22 am

Yeah im with you guys hated filth loved sunshine on leith ! went to see american hustle the first 45 mins dragged at bit for me thank god for amy adams being braless it really keeped me going lol but must admit the movie was fantastic after that.Christian bale was very 1977 elvis like in his performance or maybe that was just me !!! lol

Re: last movie you watched

Thu Jan 30, 2014 4:30 pm

Dan_T wrote:Last film I watched was the Blu Ray of "What Dreams May Come" Starring, Robin Williams. :)

Love it, watched it about five times.

Last night I watched "The Internship" starring Vince Vaughn, Owen Wilson and the beautiful Rose Byrne.
Far too long and not funny enough for my taste. Too many stereotype cliches in the story line too.

Re: last movie you watched

Thu Jan 30, 2014 7:53 pm

luckyjackson1 wrote:
Dan_T wrote:Last film I watched was the Blu Ray of "What Dreams May Come" Starring, Robin Williams. :)

Love it, watched it about five times.

Last night I watched "The Internship" starring Vince Vaughn, Owen Wilson and the beautiful Rose Byrne.
Far too long and not funny enough for my taste. Too many stereotype cliches in the story line too.



I really enjoyed the Internship thought it was very funny ! vince vaughn can be hit and miss bit he is good with owen wilson,i loved them both in wedding crashers !!!

Re: last movie you watched

Thu Jan 30, 2014 8:09 pm

Not watched anything lately but I bought the blu-ray version of Stand By Me at the weekend. I haven't seen it for years but it is one of my favourites..must go down as an all time classic.

I'm going to try and watch it at the weekend if the weans will give me peace.

Re: last movie you watched

Thu Jan 30, 2014 8:14 pm

daylon wrote:Not watched anything lately but I bought the blu-ray version of Stand By Me at the weekend. I haven't seen it for years but it is one of my favourites..must go down as an all time classic.

I'm going to try and watch it at the weekend if the weans will give me peace.



Stand by me is a classic ! you will love it on blu-ray and the special features are very cool too !!!

Re: last movie you watched

Fri Jan 31, 2014 2:30 pm

I saw Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit and Out of the Furnace at the cinema yesterday. The former, directed by Kenneth Branagh, and starring Chris Pine, Keira Knightley, Kevin Costner and Branagh, himself, as the chief villain. This is the first Jack Ryan film since The Sum of All Fears in 2002, which starred Ben Affleck; this, however, is an origins story, with Ryan, a former marine turned CIA analyst after a major accident in Afghanistan. Ryan, prompted into action after the events of 9/11 is quite literally starting from Ground Zero as we see him some years later in his new role heading towards Wall Street. The story is timely enough, with notions of a Russian terrorist organisation aiming to demolish the US economy, both figuratively and literally. Ryan, coached by a mentor in the shape of Kevin Costner’s Harper, and trying to juggle the concerns of his former nurse-turned-fiancé, played by Keira Knightley, soon find himself on the field and in Moscow trying to resolve what he initially thinks can be done with his analytical mind, not lifting a gun. Given the setting and broad treatment of the Russian villains, or “baddies,” given how they’re played, Jack Ryan; Shadow Recruit very much harks back to the Cold War inspired thrillers of the 1980s, although the influence of the Jason Bourne movies is clearly present here, also. Pine is very good as Ryan, playing the character close to his chest as he engages in action scenes with smarts and wide-eyed concern given that he’s playing a fish out of water here. Costner, who I’ve always liked, brings a quiet authority to his role and helps add a touch of gravitas to an otherwise breezy action film. An action film that’s clever and well directed by Branagh, who seems to be relish in his role, especially playing coy next to Knightley, whose character, on the suspicion of Ryan having an affair, ends up in Russia and in the general melee as notion of True Lies are also conjured up. There’s some great action set-pieces here, and although the overall standard doesn’t match the Bourne films or the best of the recent James Bond or Mission Impossible movies, this is an entertaining and occasionally intense movie that succeeds quite amiably throughout.

Out of the Furnace is Scott Cooper’s second film as director after the praise and success of Crazy Heart, in 2009. Like Crazy Heart, this is very much a character study and boasts a fine array of actors on splendid form. The story, of two brothers, played by Christian Bale and Casey Affleck, centres around Affleck’s inability to adjust to society after serving in Iraq. He’s drawn into the world of bare knuckle fighting, much to the dismay of his elder brother, who wants him to work in the local foundry. Filmed in Pennsylvania, Out of the Furnace both looks and feels quite similar to The Deer Hunter, although we never leave home soil. Cooper, who also wrote the screenplay, uses the characters as emblems of society making their purpose relevant to a bigger picture both within and out with the narrative -- Bale is symbolic of hard work and decency, Affleck, disillusionment and anger, whilst Willem Defoe and Woody Harrelson, who play a small-time money-lender and a backwoods gangster, are representative of Wall Street and Government and how they can dictate the lives of ordinary people. The results are quite compelling during the first two-thirds of the film, with Bale attached to an underused Zoe Saldana and a turn of events fracturing both his love life and family life. Themes of family and brotherhood are also strong here, and whilst the film steps assuredly and moves at a stately pace, the final act veers into more conventional territory and undoes much of the underlying tension by changing gears and becoming a film of a different nature. Which is quite unfortunate, because there’s much to admire in Out of the Furnace, not least of all Christian Bale in a performance the equivalent of anything he’s done recently. Casey Affleck is very good at brining anger and a boiling pot mentality to his roles, and does so superbly in this film. Forest Whitaker is also among the cast, with one of the smaller roles as a town sheriff; Whitaker is usually reliable and is no less than such here. Woody Harrelson is also very good, although the initial introduction to his character establishes the type of man he is, this first scene is also at odds with the better aspects of the film. Recommended, though; with some reservations of the denouement, but great acting and solid direction throughout.

Re: last movie you watched

Fri Jan 31, 2014 5:20 pm

The China Syndrome (1979) Jack Lemmon, Jane Fonda.

Re: last movie you watched

Fri Jan 31, 2014 8:21 pm

greystoke wrote:I saw Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit and Out of the Furnace at the cinema yesterday. The former, directed by Kenneth Branagh, and starring Chris Pine, Keira Knightley, Kevin Costner and Branagh, himself, as the chief villain. This is the first Jack Ryan film since The Sum of All Fears in 2002, which starred Ben Affleck; this, however, is an origins story, with Ryan, a former marine turned CIA analyst after a major accident in Afghanistan. Ryan, prompted into action after the events of 9/11 is quite literally starting from Ground Zero as we see him some years later in his new role heading towards Wall Street. The story is timely enough, with notions of a Russian terrorist organisation aiming to demolish the US economy, both figuratively and literally. Ryan, coached by a mentor in the shape of Kevin Costner’s Harper, and trying to juggle the concerns of his former nurse-turned-fiancé, played by Keira Knightley, soon find himself on the field and in Moscow trying to resolve what he initially thinks can be done with his analytical mind, not lifting a gun. Given the setting and broad treatment of the Russian villains, or “baddies,” given how they’re played, Jack Ryan; Shadow Recruit very much harks back to the Cold War inspired thrillers of the 1980s, although the influence of the Jason Bourne movies is clearly present here, also. Pine is very good as Ryan, playing the character close to his chest as he engages in action scenes with smarts and wide-eyed concern given that he’s playing a fish out of water here. Costner, who I’ve always liked, brings a quiet authority to his role and helps add a touch of gravitas to an otherwise breezy action film. An action film that’s clever and well directed by Branagh, who seems to be relish in his role, especially playing coy next to Knightley, whose character, on the suspicion of Ryan having an affair, ends up in Russia and in the general melee as notion of True Lies are also conjured up. There’s some great action set-pieces here, and although the overall standard doesn’t match the Bourne films or the best of the recent James Bond or Mission Impossible movies, this is an entertaining and occasionally intense movie that succeeds quite amiably throughout.

Out of the Furnace is Scott Cooper’s second film as director after the praise and success of Crazy Heart, in 2009. Like Crazy Heart, this is very much a character study and boasts a fine array of actors on splendid form. The story, of two brothers, played by Christian Bale and Casey Affleck, centres around Affleck’s inability to adjust to society after serving in Iraq. He’s drawn into the world of bare knuckle fighting, much to the dismay of his elder brother, who wants him to work in the local foundry. Filmed in Pennsylvania, Out of the Furnace both looks and feels quite similar to The Deer Hunter, although we never leave home soil. Cooper, who also wrote the screenplay, uses the characters as emblems of society making their purpose relevant to a bigger picture both within and out with the narrative -- Bale is symbolic of hard work and decency, Affleck, disillusionment and anger, whilst Willem Defoe and Woody Harrelson, who play a small-time money-lender and a backwoods gangster, are representative of Wall Street and Government and how they can dictate the lives of ordinary people. The results are quite compelling during the first two-thirds of the film, with Bale attached to an underused Zoe Saldana and a turn of events fracturing both his love life and family life. Themes of family and brotherhood are also strong here, and whilst the film steps assuredly and moves at a stately pace, the final act veers into more conventional territory and undoes much of the underlying tension by changing gears and becoming a film of a different nature. Which is quite unfortunate, because there’s much to admire in Out of the Furnace, not least of all Christian Bale in a performance the equivalent of anything he’s done recently. Casey Affleck is very good at brining anger and a boiling pot mentality to his roles, and does so superbly in this film. Forest Whitaker is also among the cast, with one of the smaller roles as a town sheriff; Whitaker is usually reliable and is no less than such here. Woody Harrelson is also very good, although the initial introduction to his character establishes the type of man he is, this first scene is also at odds with the better aspects of the film. Recommended, though; with some reservations of the denouement, but great acting and solid direction throughout.



Thankyou for the reviews :smt023

Re: last movie you watched

Sat Feb 01, 2014 4:45 am

This was tonight's film of choice. A very good but somewhat depressing film I thought. Once again Cate Blanchett delivers a great performance. I will watch any film she stars in as she never disappoints. She is one of the absolute best. All the performances in this film were top notch by a great cast.
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Re: last movie you watched

Sat Feb 01, 2014 4:41 pm

I also watched Filth and concur with views here, I so wanted to like this film but found it completely uninvolving, have not read the book so cant compare the two but an audience must have some empathy at some level with the characters to get into a movie, here it was sadly devoid of such.
On the other hand I also seen Dallas Buyers Club and found it a very powerful film with direction and acting at the very top of the game. Mathew McConaughey's performance easily the best Ive seen in some time from any actor, sorry Leo, it has to be in the bag.[never thought I'd say those words about a rom com king] Also an honourable mention has to be said of Jared Leto, a truly wonderful return to the big screen.

Re: last movie you watched

Sun Feb 02, 2014 1:17 pm

Went to see The Wolf of Wall Street at the cinema yeaterday,as a one off watch it was a good movie as far as the story goes well over the top.Leonardo DiCaprio was amazing as always.the downside (for me)i hated the main character Jordan Belfort now i don't mind people doing well for themselfs in life,but if everything this guy did thats in the movie is true then i just can not relate to the character,he stole from working class people and became rich and out of contol and the more i watched the more irritated i became.would i buy this movie to keep no,would i watch it again no,but as a one off movie worth watching for an eye opener to see how higher up people deal with our money or even run our country.

Re: last movie you watched

Sun Feb 02, 2014 2:19 pm

rocknroller wrote:Went to see The Wolf of Wall Street at the cinema yeaterday,as a one off watch it was a good movie as far as the story goes well over the top.Leonardo DiCaprio was amazing as always.the downside (for me)i hated the main character Jordan Belfort now i don't mind people doing well for themselfs in life,but if everything this guy did thats in the movie is true then i just can not relate to the character,he stole from working class people and became rich and out of contol and the more i watched the more irritated i became.would i buy this movie to keep no,would i watch it again no,but as a one off movie worth watching for an eye opener to see how higher up people deal with our money or even run our country.


I think an inability to find a way to really empathise with Jordan Belfort, or at least get on his side, is one if the few drawbacks in The Wolf of Wall Street. I liked it very much, incidentally, but you're absolutely right, rocknroller. Di Caprio is sensational here, of course; it's one of his best performances, in my opinion. But we never see the other side of his actions -- the ramifications on those whom he scams, and whose voices we only occasionally hear. There isn't much in the way of remorse, either, which begs the question of whether this really is a cautionary tale, or a film that revels in the excess shown. There's also a slight air of misogyny, although I would like to think this isn't deliberate. Scorsese depicts a man's world, and other than Joanna Lumley, who was very good here, the female roles are both limited and dubious when, near the end, a co-worker who is said to have been very important for the company and having been there from the start, was totally new to my eyes within the narrative. Perhaps I missed her earlier in the film, but this was a token nod among hookers and strippers. I thought Margot Robbie, who played Belfort's second wife, was very good in her role, though. She's gorgeous and captivating on screen, but brings more than great looks; she plays smart and has tons of personality. I also thought she was good in About Time, Richard Curtis' most recent film.

Re: last movie you watched

Sun Feb 02, 2014 2:40 pm

jak wrote:This was tonight's film of choice. A very good but somewhat depressing film I thought. Once again Cate Blanchett delivers a great performance. I will watch any film she stars in as she never disappoints. She is one of the absolute best. All the performances in this film were top notch by a great cast.


I thought Blue Jasmine was quite splendid, both as a character study and a satire on the financial crisis. It's Woody Allen at his finest, in my opinion, and Cate Blanchett on exceptional form. She's my pick for Best Actress at the Oscars this year; and has been since I saw the film. Sally Hawkins is also superb, whilst Alec Baldwin once again nailed the kind of unscrupulous character he's so adept at playing. A big surprise to me, however, was Andrew Dice Clay, an actor whom I've never give more than a second thought to. He brought genuine pathos and a strong sense of understanding to his role. Blue Jasmine a great looking film, also; whilst the soundtrack is near perfect, in my opinion. There are shades of A Streetcar Named Desire here, but this isn't a drawback or a concern when there's such excellence on screen.

Re: last movie you watched

Sun Feb 02, 2014 5:38 pm

"I thought Blue Jasmine was quite splendid, both as a character study and a satire on the financial crisis. It's Woody Allen at his finest, in my opinion, and Cate Blanchett on exceptional form. She's my pick for Best Actress at the Oscars this year; and has been since I saw the film. Sally Hawkins is also superb, whilst Alec Baldwin once again nailed the kind of unscrupulous character he's so adept at playing. A big surprise to me, however, was Andrew Dice Clay, an actor whom I've never give more than a second thought to. He brought genuine pathos and a strong sense of understanding to his role. Blue Jasmine a great looking film, also; whilst the soundtrack is near perfect, in my opinion. There are shades of A Streetcar Named Desire here, but this isn't a drawback or a concern when there's such excellence on screen."

Totally agree. I wish Clay would have had more time on screen. I think he surprised many people with this performance. Hopefully we will see more of him as a result.
I have a question for you Greystoke. What are you're thoughts on the ending of the film? Were you sympathetic to the character in spite of her flaws?

Re: last movie you watched

Sun Feb 02, 2014 5:52 pm

Made some time for this film I had never seen. Ang Lee has made some outstanding films and this one was very good. The cinematography was perfect. A very good looking film. Set in the 70's the film had great atmosphere. This movie wasn't a success when released and is somewhat forgotten about I think. Lee's other works have far out shadowed it. It's worth seeking out and deserves a watch though. As usual the Criterion release is outstanding.
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Re: last movie you watched

Sun Feb 02, 2014 5:56 pm

jak wrote:"I thought Blue Jasmine was quite splendid, both as a character study and a satire on the financial crisis. It's Woody Allen at his finest, in my opinion, and Cate Blanchett on exceptional form. She's my pick for Best Actress at the Oscars this year; and has been since I saw the film. Sally Hawkins is also superb, whilst Alec Baldwin once again nailed the kind of unscrupulous character he's so adept at playing. A big surprise to me, however, was Andrew Dice Clay, an actor whom I've never give more than a second thought to. He brought genuine pathos and a strong sense of understanding to his role. Blue Jasmine a great looking film, also; whilst the soundtrack is near perfect, in my opinion. There are shades of A Streetcar Named Desire here, but this isn't a drawback or a concern when there's such excellence on screen."

Totally agree. I wish Clay would have had more time on screen. I think he surprised many people with this performance. Hopefully we will see more of him as a result.
I have a question for you Greystoke. What are you're thoughts on the ending of the film? Were you sympathetic to the character in spite of her flaws?


I was sympathetic to her; she's a flawed character, and a character used to a certain lifestyle. But she's wounded, disillusioned and desperately out of her element. She was also very vulnerable and despite her callous facade, I didn't find her to be an entirely unlikable character -- even if decency doesn't come easy. But she's also determined and I thought at the end of Blue Jasmine that she had sunk to rock bottom, partly through her own devices, but would find a way back. The ending was certainly sobering and tragic in a way, but rung very true and can be mused on further because she's such a complex, but well-written character who we're able to understand.

Re: last movie you watched

Sun Feb 02, 2014 6:00 pm

jak wrote:Made some time for this film I had never seen. Ang Lee has made some outstanding films and this one was very good. The cinematography was perfect. A very good looking film. Set in the 70's the film had great atmosphere. This movie wasn't a success when released and is somewhat forgotten about I think. Lee's other works have far out shadowed it. It's worth seeking out and deserves a watch though. As usual the Criterion release is outstanding.


I'm a big fan of Ang Lee and rate The Ice Storm very highly.

Re: last movie you watched

Sun Feb 02, 2014 8:26 pm

"I was sympathetic to her; she's a flawed character, and a character used to a certain lifestyle. But she's wounded, disillusioned and desperately out of her element. She was also very vulnerable and despite her callous facade, I didn't find her to be an entirely unlikable character -- even if decency doesn't come easy. But she's also determined and I thought at the end of Blue Jasmine that she had sunk to rock bottom, partly through her own devices, but would find a way back. The ending was certainly sobering and tragic in a way, but rung very true and can be mused on further because she's such a complex, but well-written character who we're able to understand."

That's how I felt about the character as well. I think a lot of that is due in part to Cate Blanchett's performance. Her character was the type who you might say she got just what she deserved. That final scene was amazing. I could feel the despair and sense of bewilderment. I thought that final scene on the bench was heartbreaking. Blanchett is just incredible.