Chat talk and light discussion

Re: last movie you watched

Fri Jan 03, 2014 6:15 pm

greystoke wrote:I'm really looking forward to Grudge Match.

I won't tell you who wins the boxing match, then.

No matter how much you beg.

Re: last movie you watched

Fri Jan 03, 2014 9:09 pm

Rob wrote:
greystoke wrote:I'm really looking forward to Grudge Match.

I won't tell you who wins the boxing match, then.

No matter how much you beg.


I'm trying to avoid reading about this one, Rob. So, yeah . . . But that's a downside with the internet, that one can just stumble upon plot details best left unknown. Which is unfortunate, because movie fans like to read about movies and discuss movies. It's especially galling when a review lets slip. In fact, just today I was listening to a rundown of the top ten films for last week on the radio, where some of the plotting of Anchorman 2 was given away. This isn't a film I'm in a rush to see, but I'd like to find out what happens for myself, and whilst watching the actual movie. The same applies to cameos in films.

Re: last movie you watched

Sat Jan 04, 2014 9:45 pm

I saw American Hustle at the cinema today, which was written and directed by David O. Russell and stars Christian Bale, Amy Adams, Bradley Cooper, Jeremy Renner and Jennifer Lawrence. Here, Bale is a conman who works - and is in a relationship - with Amy Adams, although he's also married to Jennifer Lawrence's character. When they're caught by Bradley Cooper's FBI agent, a deal is made for their freedom if they'll cooperate and put a sting on the local mayor, played by Jeremy Renner. Set in 1978, American Hustle is brimming with style, confident performances and astute direction mixed with a terrific soundtrack that features Duke Ellington, Wings, Frank Sinatra, Elton John and Ella Fitzgerald, amongst others. It's well written and perceptively clever, although it's more akin to being a showcase for the broad performances of its stars than a clear narrative. A narrative that may have more to say about post-Watergate political corruption and underworld influence had it remained more focused on singular story-telling aspects. Instead, Russell doesn't allow the intricacies of the plot to easily settle, keeping the performances taught and the audience engaged in those performances in spite of any subtext that may be culled. And the performances are excellent on every level, although Bale does look quite similar to Tom Cruise's Les Grossman -- and there are broad comic strokes abound here. Especially in a character we first see gluing down a piece of turf-cum-hair onto his head before working on the most elaborate comb-over you'll ever see. But that's key to the narrative and a world in which the characters exist solely on what they outwardly project -- Amy Adams is particularly good here, with dual accents and a a sexual allure that has who she wants doing what she wants. Although Jennifer Lawrence's performance reaches moments of tour-de-force bringing her own sexuality met with a coy duplicity and a touch of naivety amidst the scheming. Cooper and Renner have more straightforward parts, but bring a strong and vibrant presence to key roles. Whilst the feeling for the period, complete with garish and revealing outfits, works a treat and adds its own facet of curiosity amidst flared trousers, gaudy jewellery and plunging necklines. The ultimate payoff may not have the sting one would hope for, but this is vibrant and knowing film-making that asks for repeated viewings and faulters only in making an apology for the kind of characters we enjoy spending time with.

Re: last movie you watched

Sun Jan 05, 2014 5:45 am

greystoke wrote:I saw American Hustle at the cinema today, which was written and directed by David O. Russell and stars Christian Bale, Amy Adams, Bradley Cooper, Jeremy Renner and Jennifer Lawrence. Here, Bale is a conman who works - and is in a relationship - with Amy Adams, although he's also married to Jennifer Lawrence's character. When they're caught by Bradley Cooper's FBI agent, a deal is made for their freedom if they'll cooperate and put a sting on the local mayor, played by Jeremy Renner. Set in 1978, American Hustle is brimming with style, confident performances and astute direction mixed with a terrific soundtrack that features Duke Ellington, Wings, Frank Sinatra, Elton John and Ella Fitzgerald, amongst others. It's well written and perceptively clever, although it's more akin to being a showcase for the broad performances of its stars than a clear narrative. A narrative that may have more to say about post-Watergate political corruption and underworld influence had it remained more focused on singular story-telling aspects. Instead, Russell doesn't allow the intricacies of the plot to easily settle, keeping the performances taught and the audience engaged in those performances in spite of any subtext that may be culled. And the performances are excellent on every level, although Bale does look quite similar to Tom Cruise's Les Grossman -- and there are broad comic strokes abound here. Especially in a character we first see gluing down a piece of turf-cum-hair onto his head before working on the most elaborate comb-over you'll ever see. But that's key to the narrative and a world in which the characters exist solely on what they outwardly project -- Amy Adams is particularly good here, with dual accents and a a sexual allure that has who she wants doing what she wants. Although Jennifer Lawrence's performance reaches moments of tour-de-force bringing her own sexuality met with a coy duplicity and a touch of naivety amidst the scheming. Cooper and Renner have more straightforward parts, but bring a strong and vibrant presence to key roles. Whilst the feeling for the period, complete with garish and revealing outfits, works a treat and adds its own facet of curiosity amidst flared trousers, gaudy jewellery and plunging necklines. The ultimate payoff may not have the sting one would hope for, but this is vibrant and knowing film-making that asks for repeated viewings and faulters only in making an apology for the kind of characters we enjoy spending time with.


Sounds like it's worth a watch - sadly 140 minutes of film in one sitting doesn't sit well with bipolar concentration levels - so it will be a three-month wait for the DVD for me!

Re: last movie you watched

Mon Jan 06, 2014 12:02 pm

Watched "Stand Up Guys" featuring Christopher Walken, Al Pacino, Alan Arkin and the wonderful Mark Magolis. Enjoyed it.

Saw "The Best Offer" starring Geoffrey Rush. Don't wanna spoil too much but in the end I was disappointed.

Looking forward to "The Wolf Of Wall Street" and "American Hustle" too. Although the latter features Renner... :roll: :wink:

Nice to have Cooper and Lawrence back together in a movie. I liked "Silver Linings Playbook". :D

Did anybody of you guys watch "Unthinkable" starring Samuel L. Jackson and Carrie-Ann Moss? A friend of mine recommended it.

Re: last movie you watched

Mon Jan 06, 2014 4:39 pm

I haven't seen Stand Up Guys, Unthinkable or The Best Offer, although I am looking forward to seeing The Best Offer. Jennifer Lawrence and Bradley Cooper share very little screen time in American Hustle, but it was great to see them act in the same film again after Silver Linings Playbook -- and under the direction of David O. Russell. They have completed another film together, a drama called Serena, but this has been struggling to find a distributor. I'm also looking forward to The Wolf of Wall Street and relish seeing DiCaprio working with Scorsese for the fifth time, I believe. I hope Scorsese manages to get his Frank Sinatra biopic out of pre-production this year and, perhaps, cast DiCaprio in the lead. Although, I also think Justin Timberlake could be good as Sinatra.

Re: last movie you watched

Mon Jan 06, 2014 5:05 pm

Last night i saw the remake of Carrie,good enough to waste a couple of hours but i much prefer the original with Sissy Spacek

Re: last movie you watched

Mon Jan 06, 2014 5:07 pm

@
keninlincs wrote:Last night i saw the remake of Carrie,good enough to waste a couple of hours but i much prefer the original with Sissy Spacek


I agree, Ken. I was quite disappointed with Carrie.

Re: last movie you watched

Mon Jan 06, 2014 5:13 pm

greystoke wrote:@
keninlincs wrote:Last night i saw the remake of Carrie,good enough to waste a couple of hours but i much prefer the original with Sissy Spacek


I agree, Ken. I was quite disappointed with Carrie.

Have you seen "The Devils Pass"yet?
i found that a far better film Renny Harlins direction is suspensful ,and gives the film a good pace with some great atmosphere

Re: last movie you watched

Mon Jan 06, 2014 5:17 pm

keninlincs wrote:
greystoke wrote:@
keninlincs wrote:Last night i saw the remake of Carrie,good enough to waste a couple of hours but i much prefer the original with Sissy Spacek


I agree, Ken. I was quite disappointed with Carrie.

Have you seen "The Devils Pass"yet?
i found that a far better film Renny Harlins direction is suspensful ,and gives the film a good pace with some great atmosphere


I haven't seen it yet, Ken. Although it does seem to have similarities to Hammer's The Abominable Snowman. Which they are remaking, incidentally.

Re: last movie you watched

Mon Jan 06, 2014 5:33 pm

greystoke wrote:
keninlincs wrote:
greystoke wrote:@
keninlincs wrote:Last night i saw the remake of Carrie,good enough to waste a couple of hours but i much prefer the original with Sissy Spacek


I agree, Ken. I was quite disappointed with Carrie.

Have you seen "The Devils Pass"yet?
i found that a far better film Renny Harlins direction is suspensful ,and gives the film a good pace with some great atmosphere


I haven't seen it yet, Ken. Although it does seem to have similarities to Hammer's The Abominable Snowman. Which they are remaking, incidentally.

i will recommend it to you,you will be pleasantly surprised.didnt know about the "Snowman"remake.Is it a Hammer production?

Re: last movie you watched

Mon Jan 06, 2014 5:42 pm

keninlincs wrote:
greystoke wrote:
keninlincs wrote:
greystoke wrote:@
keninlincs wrote:Last night i saw the remake of Carrie,good enough to waste a couple of hours but i much prefer the original with Sissy Spacek


I agree, Ken. I was quite disappointed with Carrie.

Have you seen "The Devils Pass"yet?
i found that a far better film Renny Harlins direction is suspensful ,and gives the film a good pace with some great atmosphere


I haven't seen it yet, Ken. Although it does seem to have similarities to Hammer's The Abominable Snowman. Which they are remaking, incidentally.

i will recommend it to you,you will be pleasantly surprised.didnt know about the "Snowman"remake.Is it a Hammer production?


I'll be sure to see it, Ken. Yes, the new Abominable Snowman film is a Hammer production. It's great to see them back on their feet and making interesting movies. The Quiet Ones is Hammer's next release.

phpBB [video]

Re: last movie you watched

Mon Jan 06, 2014 5:48 pm

greystoke wrote:
keninlincs wrote:
greystoke wrote:
keninlincs wrote:
greystoke wrote:@
keninlincs wrote:Last night i saw the remake of Carrie,good enough to waste a couple of hours but i much prefer the original with Sissy Spacek


I agree, Ken. I was quite disappointed with Carrie.

Have you seen "The Devils Pass"yet?
i found that a far better film Renny Harlins direction is suspensful ,and gives the film a good pace with some great atmosphere


I haven't seen it yet, Ken. Although it does seem to have similarities to Hammer's The Abominable Snowman. Which they are remaking, incidentally.

i will recommend it to you,you will be pleasantly surprised.didnt know about the "Snowman"remake.Is it a Hammer production?


I'll be sure to see it, Ken. Yes, the new Abominable Snowman film is a Hammer production. It's great to see them back on their feet and making interesting movies. The Quiet Ones is Hammer's next release.

phpBB [video]


Yes "The Quiet Ones "does look promising

Re: last movie you watched

Tue Jan 07, 2014 1:10 am

greystoke wrote:
keninlincs wrote:
greystoke wrote:@
keninlincs wrote:Last night i saw the remake of Carrie,good enough to waste a couple of hours but i much prefer the original with Sissy Spacek


I agree, Ken. I was quite disappointed with Carrie.

Have you seen "The Devils Pass"yet?
i found that a far better film Renny Harlins direction is suspensful ,and gives the film a good pace with some great atmosphere


I haven't seen it yet, Ken. Although it does seem to have similarities to Hammer's The Abominable Snowman. Which they are remaking, incidentally.


I saw the Abominable Snowman over Christmas on TV and thought it was really quite a bore.

Re: last movie you watched

Tue Jan 07, 2014 9:14 am

greystoke wrote:
keninlincs wrote:
greystoke wrote:
keninlincs wrote:
greystoke wrote:@
keninlincs wrote:Last night i saw the remake of Carrie,good enough to waste a couple of hours but i much prefer the original with Sissy Spacek


I agree, Ken. I was quite disappointed with Carrie.

Have you seen "The Devils Pass"yet?
i found that a far better film Renny Harlins direction is suspensful ,and gives the film a good pace with some great atmosphere


I haven't seen it yet, Ken. Although it does seem to have similarities to Hammer's The Abominable Snowman. Which they are remaking, incidentally.

i will recommend it to you,you will be pleasantly surprised.didnt know about the "Snowman"remake.Is it a Hammer production?


I'll be sure to see it, Ken. Yes, the new Abominable Snowman film is a Hammer production. It's great to see them back on their feet and making interesting movies. The Quiet Ones is Hammer's next release.

phpBB [video]


I really enjoyed "The Lady In Black" starring Daniel Radcliffe. Scared the sh*t out of me.

Don't know if I want to see Timberlake playing Sinatra though. And I'm not sure if it would fit Leo - I thought he's going to have a break from the movie business?

Started to watch "Bachlorette" starring Kirsten Dunst and Isla Fisher but couldn't go very far because of time issues.

Re: last movie you watched

Tue Jan 07, 2014 6:46 pm

poormadpeter wrote:
greystoke wrote:
keninlincs wrote:
greystoke wrote:@
keninlincs wrote:Last night i saw the remake of Carrie,good enough to waste a couple of hours but i much prefer the original with Sissy Spacek


I agree, Ken. I was quite disappointed with Carrie.

Have you seen "The Devils Pass"yet?
i found that a far better film Renny Harlins direction is suspensful ,and gives the film a good pace with some great atmosphere


I haven't seen it yet, Ken. Although it does seem to have similarities to Hammer's The Abominable Snowman. Which they are remaking, incidentally.


I saw the Abominable Snowman over Christmas on TV and thought it was really quite a bore.


Hammer's Abominable Snowman is a film I've always loved. It's certainly slow of pace, maybe a bit dated, but its simplicity and willingness to keep the Yeti from view are major assets next to a vibrant Peter Cushing. It's Forrest Tucker who drags it down a touch for me, although he's playing a character who is the antithesis of Cushing, which means that some conflict can arise. But I'd love to see this on Blu-ray.

Re: last movie you watched

Tue Jan 07, 2014 6:53 pm

greystoke wrote:
poormadpeter wrote:
greystoke wrote:
keninlincs wrote:
greystoke wrote:@
keninlincs wrote:Last night i saw the remake of Carrie,good enough to waste a couple of hours but i much prefer the original with Sissy Spacek


I agree, Ken. I was quite disappointed with Carrie.

Have you seen "The Devils Pass"yet?
i found that a far better film Renny Harlins direction is suspensful ,and gives the film a good pace with some great atmosphere


I haven't seen it yet, Ken. Although it does seem to have similarities to Hammer's The Abominable Snowman. Which they are remaking, incidentally.


I saw the Abominable Snowman over Christmas on TV and thought it was really quite a bore.


Hammer's Abominable Snowman is a film I've always loved. It's certainly slow of pace, maybe a bit dated, but its simplicity and willingness to keep the Yeti from view are major assets next to a vibrant Peter Cushing. It's Forrest Tucker who drags it down a touch for me, although he's playing a character who is the antithesis of Cushing, which means that some conflict can arise. But I'd love to see this on Blu-ray.

Love it ,Cushing is on top form here,the only film i didnt care for with Peter was "Biggles"he looked so out of place

Re: last movie you watched

Tue Jan 07, 2014 6:55 pm

Last night i saw"12 years a slave"Didnt like it! Mans inhumanity to man leaves me cold ,but the cast were superb in their roles

Re: last movie you watched

Tue Jan 07, 2014 7:16 pm

I think I'll see 12 Years a Slave on Friday, Ken. It certainly looks like it will be powerful and harrowing cinema.

Re: last movie you watched

Tue Jan 07, 2014 7:40 pm

Not many films upset , but that did,its certainly a great film just upsetting

mobile reply

Re: last movie you watched

Wed Jan 08, 2014 2:14 am

Went to see last vegas tonight sooooooooooo funny.may be the funniest movie of 2014 and it only january !!!

Re: last movie you watched

Wed Jan 08, 2014 3:47 pm

keninlincs wrote:Not many films upset , but that did,its certainly a great film just upsetting

mobile reply

A smilar thing happened to me when I watched "The Seasoning House", "120 Days Of Sodom" and "The Passion Of The Christ".
Those movies can give you bleeding ulcers.

Re: last movie you watched

Wed Jan 08, 2014 3:53 pm

luckyjackson1 wrote:
keninlincs wrote:Not many films upset , but that did,its certainly a great film just upsetting

mobile reply

A smilar thing happened to me when I watched "The Seasoning House", "120 Days Of Sodom" and "The Passion Of The Christ".
Those movies can give you bleeding ulcers.

Only seen the seasoning house,tense stuff indeed in that one

Re: last movie you watched

Wed Jan 08, 2014 3:59 pm

Last night we watched "Captain Philips"with Tom Hanks,a fantastic film about Somali Pirates and the first pirate attack on a US ship in over 200 years
edge of your seat stuff
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Re: last movie you watched

Thu Jan 09, 2014 12:40 am

Today at the cinema I saw The Secret Life of Walter Mitty, Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom and All is Lost. The 1947 version of The Secret Life of Walter Mitty has long been a favourite film of mine, certainly one that's lingered from childhood, although it wouldn't be in my top-ten nowadays. That film was the epitome of what a star vehicle could be during the forties; especially for a talent such as Danny Kaye. It's bright, fanciful, puts Kaye front-and-centre with opportunity to showcase his many talents, whilst offering a gorgeous love interest in Virginia Mayo, and a risible villain in the ominous shape of Boris Karloff. Plot-wise, this was paper thin, and whilst Ben Stiller's recent version could have been a like-minded project, this new story far exceeds what was done in 1947 and presents one of the most engaging, uplifting and joyous films of the past year. Directed by Stiller from a screenplay by Steve Conrad, this story of a daydreaming photo executive for Life magazine is a mightily impressive and very sincere effort from Stiller, whose Mitty jumps from train station platforms to burning buildings, battles his new, obnoxious boss like a superhero would a super-villain on the streets of New York, and romances his office crush, played by Kristen Wiig. But this is all in Walter's mind, of course, and part of an imagination wonderfully and creatively realised by Stiller, whose framing, composition and ability to find humour in Mitty, without making a clown of him, is hugely impressive and highly endearing. Even the opening credits are a simply effective visual treat, whilst there's genuine sadness in Stiller's facial expressions, delivery of his lines and the way which he shoots and frames the lonely, grey Mitty. As the story progresses from fantasy to realism, such care and attention to who the character is and what he needs allows for a leap of faith to be taken with Mitty when an important photo negative goes amiss and he decides to find the photographer, played by Sean Penn. There's shades of Hearts of Darkness here, as Penn is almost akin to the elusive Col. Kurtz with regards to Mitty's quest, and if there are a few broadly comical missteps, perhaps Stiller, as a director, felt occasionally unsure of himself in territory largely new to him. But he needn't have. This is utterly charming, life-affirming cinema that I enjoyed tremendously, especially with Stiller on truly ace form both in front of, and behind the camera.

I was less impressed or moved by Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom. A film that's certainly sincere, well-intentioned and does make for a good tribute to the life of Nelson Mandela, especially with such a charismatic lead in Idris Elba. There's also a good feeling for the sixties during the early parts of the film, where Mandela, as a young lawyer in South Africa, trains, marries, cheats on his wife and becomes involved in politics through his position as a lawyer. Unfortunately, some events and people are written so thinly that we barely get to appreciate much that's going on around Mandela, as his presence is so very central to the story that other characters become one dimensional or quickly skimmed over as the story leaps forward almost episodically. Elba was certainly well cast as Mandela, whom he plays with strength, conviction, sincerity and with the physicality of the man, both bodily and verbally. When he speaks, it's with truth and a real sense of integrity. This is matched by the spark in Naome Harris's portrayal of Winnie Mandela, whose character isn't brilliantly written, but does provide a contrast with Madeba and opportunity to focus the narrative elsewhere. This soon adds touches of poignancy when Mandela is incarcerated on Robben Island and the emotions of husband, wife, father and mother become present amidst the racial turmoil. But with so much scope and ambition in a story that spans several decades, it's credit to the performances and the intention of the film that it does make an emotional connection. And whilst the final act is a more stately affair, with the employment of vintage footage adding both filler and a touch of realism, it's Elba who continues to engage as the elder Mandela, even if his tremendous physicality occasionally betrays him. And whilst this was a commendable project made with sincere intentions, it's Elba who holds the film together and makes up for the shortcomings of a narrative that's too by the numbers.

Written and directed by J.C. Chador, All is Lost stars Robert Redford as a yachtsman adrift in the Indian Ocean (if memory serves me right) whose boat is hit and punctured by a floating cargo unit that's, seemingly, come off the side of a cargo ship. As he endeavours to repair the boat, he's increasingly at nature's mercy under harsh conditions with no sign of land or any other vessels at sea. There's very little in the way of dialogue as we don't even get to know the man's name, but Redford and Chandor draw the viewer in like water to the leaky vessel as danger becomes apparent. Redford, who was among the most handsome of movie stars, at 77, remains among the most accomplished, engaging and talented actors of the past fifty years, and here, he gives what may be the performance of his career. This is cinema at its most real and intimate, with Redford performing all of his own stunts and going through the mill for a man of his age. Crucially, there's no bountiful exposition or opportunity for objects, needs or musts to serve as a catalyst for dialogue and the stating of one character's position; we know how his character feels because we can see it in both him and his environment. We see the struggle and are close to gasping along with him when the boat capsises or time is of the essence, which it increasingly is throughout this tremendous film. This is absolutely one of the best films of the past year and Redford should be Oscar nominated along with the film.