Chat talk and light discussion

Last non-Elvis album you played

Sat Dec 03, 2016 10:08 pm

I'm sure we had this kind of thread for CDs/LPs, but if so it's got tucked away somewhere and I can't find it. But as we have a last movie you watched thread, I thought this might be an idea.

When I moved house in the summer, and had to unpack all my albums when I got here in the new place, I made a mental note of albums that fell into the "I really must play that again" category...and even some that fell into the "have I EVER played that" category, and so have been wading through them. This week I dug out the relatively few Christmas albums that I have and played the old MFP LP "White Christmas with Nat & Dean" which, rather oddly, has Dean Martin's version of Brahms' Lullaby on it. That, in turn, led me to dig out "Sleep Warm" which has been in my CD player most of the week now.

Sleep Warm is a Dean Martin album, arranged by Pete King and conducted by Frank Sinatra. It's a lovely album from 1959 built around songs that refer to sleep and dreaming. With the exception of the title song, all of the others are well-known standards, including Dream, All I Do Is Dream of You, and Goodnight My Love - the last of which might be the highlight of the album. King's arrangements are suitably dreamy when it comes to the ballads, but there's also some tracks that manage to swing in a gentle fashion, thus adding some unexpected variety to the record.

It's a lovely album, and Dino's voice is really suited to this type of material. My CD is from the mid-90s (there's an Our Price sticker on the front!), but it was reissued in 2005 by Collector's Choice, albeit with some very strange choices for bonus tracks that must completely break the spell that the album spends to much time trying to cast. What I Don't Care If the Sun Don't Shine and Choo'n Gum have to do with Sleep Warm is anybody's guess! So often, the running times of 50s albums might be short compared to CD maximum lengths, but they are so well constructed that the notion of bonus tracks makes the record worse and not better.

Re: Last non-Elvis album you played

Sat Dec 03, 2016 10:21 pm

"Rubber Soul" (UK, 1965), by The Beatles, is blasting as I type this.

What an incredible collection of non-single songs - "Drive My Car", "Norwegian Wood", "Nowhere Man", "Michelle", "Girl", and the unbeatable "In My Life", which gets more and more poignant and one grows older.

And the corresponding single release was... "Day Tripper" / "We Can Work It Out", maybe their best double-sider ever.

Re: Last non-Elvis album you played

Sun Dec 04, 2016 8:52 pm

Last night I listened to;

Whisky Myers ~Mud.Latest album from Southern rockers very good.Nice mix of styles with heavy rock fitting in nicely with country and roots tunes.
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Cody Jinks~Adobe Sessions.Hadn't heard of him until I got his latest album I'm Not The Devil which is one of my favourites of the year.This is his previous one and is excellent Got a bit of a 70' 's Waylon vibe to it.
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Queen~The Game.Not on the level of their classic 70' s albums perhaps but still very good.There are the classic singles but also the brilliant Dragon Attack one of the best album tracks from the 80''s. The 2011 remaster sounds fantastic as well making it the one Queen album that I like more now than I did at the time.
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norrie
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Last edited by norrie on Mon Dec 05, 2016 3:06 am, edited 1 time in total.

Re: Last non-Elvis album you played

Sun Dec 04, 2016 9:19 pm

George Best, by The Wedding Present.

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Best_(album)

Re: Last non-Elvis album you played

Sun Dec 04, 2016 10:02 pm

Gift Of Screws-Lindsey Buckingham

Re: Last non-Elvis album you played

Sun Dec 04, 2016 10:16 pm

Adam Faith...I survived from 1974 featuring contributions from Paul and Linda McCartney and Ritchie Blackmore,a great album
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Re: Last non-Elvis album you played

Sun Dec 04, 2016 10:29 pm

Yesterday I listened to the joyous Tony Bennett & Count Basie: Together at Last/A Perfect Combination (The Complete Sessions 1958 -1959) several times throughout the day.

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And today I've been listening to Jennifer Lopez`s superb This is Me . . . Then all afternoon.

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Re: Last non-Elvis album you played

Sun Dec 04, 2016 11:56 pm

The Pierces, Creation.



Re: Last non-Elvis album you played

Mon Dec 05, 2016 1:57 am

I need to get out more, I haven't heard of half these artists. I'm getting old, methinks!!!

Last night I started on the Christmas CDs, with A Very Swingin' Basie Christmas, recorded a couple of years ago. I'm not fond of big bands continuing after their namesake has passed away, but the Basie band continues to be very strong indeed, and the album is a hoot, helped along nicely by a lovely guest appearance from a 79 year old Johnny Mathis who sounds no different, it seems, than in the 1950s!

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Re: Last non-Elvis album you played

Mon Dec 05, 2016 11:56 am

The Beatles - Let it Be. and The Rolling Stones - Let it Bleed. Of course The Stones choose the title inspired by The Beatles. Great albums.

Re: Last non-Elvis album you played

Mon Dec 05, 2016 4:48 pm

Yesterday Lady Gaga's new album - Joanne. Not bad at all. Also in the last 2 weeks played Peter Paul & Mary's Greatest Hits, Dave Edmunds song mix (my own comp) and Etta James Greatest, Dave Brubeck Time Out, and Rick Nelson Live at the Troubador. Very eclectic but no Elvis for 2 weeks. Gonna check out The Stones new album soon.

Re: Last non-Elvis album you played

Wed Dec 07, 2016 10:07 am

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Re: Last non-Elvis album you played

Wed Dec 07, 2016 9:17 pm

Update - played some Bee Gees yesterday. Greatest hits vols. 1 & 2. The pre-disco stuff.

Re: Last non-Elvis album you played

Thu Dec 08, 2016 4:11 am

Lissie - Back To Forever (the deluxe edition which has some great extra tracks)

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Re: Last non-Elvis album you played

Thu Dec 08, 2016 4:51 pm

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Re: Last non-Elvis album you played

Sat Dec 10, 2016 8:31 pm

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Lovely album!

Allmusic:

http://www.allmusic.com/album/the-river-the-thread-mw0002591753

Nearly eight years after Rosanne Cash last released a set of original songs, 2014's The River & the Thread finds her in a reflective mood, and just as 2009's The List saw her looking back with a set of classic songs recommended by her father, the late country legend Johnny Cash, The River & the Thread is dominated by thoughts and emotions that occurred to her as she was involved in a project to restore Johnny's boyhood home. This doesn't mean that Cash has returned to the spunky, country-accented sound of her most popular work -- this is still Rosanne Cash the mature and thoughtful singer/songwriter we've come to know since the late '90s, and the tone of this album is unfailingly literate. But though this music isn't country, it's certainly Southern, and road trips from Alabama to Tennessee, visits to the Tallahatchie Bridge and Money Street, and vintage gospel music on the radio embroider these songs as Cash immerses herself in the places that were once close to home as if she's reuniting with long lost family. And two of the songs cut especially close to home -- "Etta's Tune" was written in memory of Marshall Grant, a longtime family friend and member of Johnny Cash's band, while "When the Master Calls the Roll" is a tale of love torn apart during the Civil War that Cash wrote in collaboration with her former husband Rodney Crowell and current spouse John Leventhal -- and they rank with the best material on the album, genuine and heartfelt, and written and performed with a genuine passion that never sinks into sentimental histrionics. Just as Cash's songs are crafted with a subtle intelligence, her vocals here are superb, getting to the heart of the lyrics without painting herself into a corner, and the production is rich but elegant and to the point. Rosanne Cash hasn't been especially prolific in the 21st century, and at under 40 minutes, she wasn't crafting an epic with The River & the Thread. But she's learned to make every word and every note count, and this album confirms once again that she's matured into a singular artist with the talent and the vision to make these stories of her travels in the South come to vivid and affecting life.

Re: Last non-Elvis album you played

Sat Dec 10, 2016 8:42 pm

Another one I played today and that's really growing on me:

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AllMusic

http://www.allmusic.com/album/down-to-believing-mw0002806321

Down to Believing
Review by Thom Jurek

On her eighth studio album, Allison Moorer reunites with producer Kenny Greenberg. He helmed her first two MCA albums, 1998's Alabama Song and 2000's The Hardest Part. They spent two years recording Down to Believing at various Nashville studios. Life-changing circumstances -- living in New York, being the mother of a young son with autism, going through a divorce, the availability of musicians -- dictated the pace. Despite all this, Down to Believing is the most focused and candid recording in her catalog. Its 13 songs (12 originals and a gorgeous cover of Creedence Clearwater Revival's "Have You Ever Seen the Rain") consciously reflect the crucible of recent experience, without hiding behind characters. While these songs are vulnerable, they never flinch. More often than not -- as evidenced by "Like It Used to Be," the rocking first single and set opener -- Moorer comes out swinging: "...I can't hang on only losers weep/Somebody ain’t nobody anybody can keep…." "Thunderstorm Hurricane" begins with acoustic guitar and brooding strings, but soon, gnarly, metallic, electric guitars and kick drums frame the drama. This testament to the frustration of miscommunication with a lover explodes. The singer's refusal to comply or be complacent becomes a righteous anger: "...Drop by drop I disappear/It’s like I wasn’t ever here…" The journey through a relationship becomes even more poignant on the slow country waltz of the title track, a song of reflection and doubt; the singer keeps her simmering emotions contained, but subtle tensions mount. It foreshadows the rage and indictment of emotional abuse in "Tear Me Apart." Moorer, buoyed by blistering guitars, banjo, mandolins, snares, and cymbals is confused, broken, and ultimately refuses to become a target of rage. Her vocal, drenched in raw country soul and blues, reveals her truth: ...What am I/Supposed to say/When I want to scream every time you look my way..." "If I Were Stronger," a dramatic ballad, reveals the expected toll of that endurance and the stalemates it results in: romantic love and relationships die. "Blood" is an offering of unconditional love. Highlighted by weeping pedal steel and acoustic guitar, this country song reveals the definition of "agape." (Moorer says it was written for her sister, Shelby Lynne.) "Mama Let the Wolf In" is a bluesy, swampy, rockabilly burner about a mother's inability to shield her child from all of life's tough cards. While "I'm Doing Fine" is a rootsy testament to moving on, "Back of My Mind," with its pop hook, balances determination and self-doubt. The intimate slide- and mandolin-driven closer "Gonna Get It Wrong" is a hymn to self-acceptance and self-reliance: "...Got a true blue heart ...and it falls apart...I know I’m gonna get it wrong but it’s alright." Somehow, the listener knows it is. It's the only sendoff a songwriter like Moorer could deliver on Down to Believing, an emotionally raw yet aesthetically fine album. She may have reached into the depths for these songs, but she's delivered us the gift of a burning light.

Re: Last non-Elvis album you played

Sun Dec 11, 2016 2:05 am

Mine was this one.

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I picked this twofer up at a record fair for a pound or two - and thought it would go straight back on ebay. I thought it was a collection of 1940s sides, but WRONG. I thought it would be pretty awful. WRONG. In fact, these two 1968 albums are great fun - not everyone, admittedly, but real put-a-smile-on-your-face music. And rather like some of the Elvis soundtracks, for example, that's all an album needs to do. It doesn't have to set the world alight, but just be FUN.
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Re: Last non-Elvis album you played

Sun Dec 11, 2016 4:01 am

Thanks, I'll check them out. Don't know much about Mills Brothers & Count Basie, but I'll give it try! Cheers.

Re: Last non-Elvis album you played

Sun Dec 11, 2016 5:04 am

Stvimpe wrote:Thanks, I'll check them out. Don't know much about Mills Brothers & Count Basie, but I'll give it try! Cheers.


If you go to the classic artist section, there are some vids from the album on the count basie thread.

Re: Last non-Elvis album you played

Mon Dec 12, 2016 8:33 pm

Disco extravaganza last night!

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Re: Last non-Elvis album you played

Tue Dec 13, 2016 4:41 pm

Stvimpe wrote:Another one I played today and that's really growing on me:

Image


AllMusic

http://www.allmusic.com/album/down-to-believing-mw0002806321

Down to Believing
Review by Thom Jurek

On her eighth studio album, Allison Moorer reunites with producer Kenny Greenberg. He helmed her first two MCA albums, 1998's Alabama Song and 2000's The Hardest Part. They spent two years recording Down to Believing at various Nashville studios. Life-changing circumstances -- living in New York, being the mother of a young son with autism, going through a divorce, the availability of musicians -- dictated the pace. Despite all this, Down to Believing is the most focused and candid recording in her catalog. Its 13 songs (12 originals and a gorgeous cover of Creedence Clearwater Revival's "Have You Ever Seen the Rain") consciously reflect the crucible of recent experience, without hiding behind characters. While these songs are vulnerable, they never flinch. More often than not -- as evidenced by "Like It Used to Be," the rocking first single and set opener -- Moorer comes out swinging: "...I can't hang on only losers weep/Somebody ain’t nobody anybody can keep…." "Thunderstorm Hurricane" begins with acoustic guitar and brooding strings, but soon, gnarly, metallic, electric guitars and kick drums frame the drama. This testament to the frustration of miscommunication with a lover explodes. The singer's refusal to comply or be complacent becomes a righteous anger: "...Drop by drop I disappear/It’s like I wasn’t ever here…" The journey through a relationship becomes even more poignant on the slow country waltz of the title track, a song of reflection and doubt; the singer keeps her simmering emotions contained, but subtle tensions mount. It foreshadows the rage and indictment of emotional abuse in "Tear Me Apart." Moorer, buoyed by blistering guitars, banjo, mandolins, snares, and cymbals is confused, broken, and ultimately refuses to become a target of rage. Her vocal, drenched in raw country soul and blues, reveals her truth: ...What am I/Supposed to say/When I want to scream every time you look my way..." "If I Were Stronger," a dramatic ballad, reveals the expected toll of that endurance and the stalemates it results in: romantic love and relationships die. "Blood" is an offering of unconditional love. Highlighted by weeping pedal steel and acoustic guitar, this country song reveals the definition of "agape." (Moorer says it was written for her sister, Shelby Lynne.) "Mama Let the Wolf In" is a bluesy, swampy, rockabilly burner about a mother's inability to shield her child from all of life's tough cards. While "I'm Doing Fine" is a rootsy testament to moving on, "Back of My Mind," with its pop hook, balances determination and self-doubt. The intimate slide- and mandolin-driven closer "Gonna Get It Wrong" is a hymn to self-acceptance and self-reliance: "...Got a true blue heart ...and it falls apart...I know I’m gonna get it wrong but it’s alright." Somehow, the listener knows it is. It's the only sendoff a songwriter like Moorer could deliver on Down to Believing, an emotionally raw yet aesthetically fine album. She may have reached into the depths for these songs, but she's delivered us the gift of a burning light.


A good album indeed. I enjoy it very much. I would also suggest to you Melissa Etheridge's new album Memphis Rock and Soul. Great covers of classic rock, soul, and R&B. An album I was expecting from Elvis when he went to Stax. She does it for you here.

Re: Last non-Elvis album you played

Tue Dec 13, 2016 8:17 pm

Today I've been listening to.

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Re: Last non-Elvis album you played

Tue Dec 13, 2016 8:24 pm

r&b wrote:
Stvimpe wrote:Another one I played today and that's really growing on me:

Image


AllMusic

http://www.allmusic.com/album/down-to-believing-mw0002806321

Down to Believing
Review by Thom Jurek

On her eighth studio album, Allison Moorer reunites with producer Kenny Greenberg. He helmed her first two MCA albums, 1998's Alabama Song and 2000's The Hardest Part. They spent two years recording Down to Believing at various Nashville studios. Life-changing circumstances -- living in New York, being the mother of a young son with autism, going through a divorce, the availability of musicians -- dictated the pace. Despite all this, Down to Believing is the most focused and candid recording in her catalog. Its 13 songs (12 originals and a gorgeous cover of Creedence Clearwater Revival's "Have You Ever Seen the Rain") consciously reflect the crucible of recent experience, without hiding behind characters. While these songs are vulnerable, they never flinch. More often than not -- as evidenced by "Like It Used to Be," the rocking first single and set opener -- Moorer comes out swinging: "...I can't hang on only losers weep/Somebody ain’t nobody anybody can keep…." "Thunderstorm Hurricane" begins with acoustic guitar and brooding strings, but soon, gnarly, metallic, electric guitars and kick drums frame the drama. This testament to the frustration of miscommunication with a lover explodes. The singer's refusal to comply or be complacent becomes a righteous anger: "...Drop by drop I disappear/It’s like I wasn’t ever here…" The journey through a relationship becomes even more poignant on the slow country waltz of the title track, a song of reflection and doubt; the singer keeps her simmering emotions contained, but subtle tensions mount. It foreshadows the rage and indictment of emotional abuse in "Tear Me Apart." Moorer, buoyed by blistering guitars, banjo, mandolins, snares, and cymbals is confused, broken, and ultimately refuses to become a target of rage. Her vocal, drenched in raw country soul and blues, reveals her truth: ...What am I/Supposed to say/When I want to scream every time you look my way..." "If I Were Stronger," a dramatic ballad, reveals the expected toll of that endurance and the stalemates it results in: romantic love and relationships die. "Blood" is an offering of unconditional love. Highlighted by weeping pedal steel and acoustic guitar, this country song reveals the definition of "agape." (Moorer says it was written for her sister, Shelby Lynne.) "Mama Let the Wolf In" is a bluesy, swampy, rockabilly burner about a mother's inability to shield her child from all of life's tough cards. While "I'm Doing Fine" is a rootsy testament to moving on, "Back of My Mind," with its pop hook, balances determination and self-doubt. The intimate slide- and mandolin-driven closer "Gonna Get It Wrong" is a hymn to self-acceptance and self-reliance: "...Got a true blue heart ...and it falls apart...I know I’m gonna get it wrong but it’s alright." Somehow, the listener knows it is. It's the only sendoff a songwriter like Moorer could deliver on Down to Believing, an emotionally raw yet aesthetically fine album. She may have reached into the depths for these songs, but she's delivered us the gift of a burning light.


A good album indeed. I enjoy it very much. I would also suggest to you Melissa Etheridge's new album Memphis Rock and Soul. Great covers of classic rock, soul, and R&B. An album I was expecting from Elvis when he went to Stax. She does it for you here.


Thank you, r&b, for your kind suggestion. Looking forward to hearing it.

Re: Last non-Elvis album you played

Tue Dec 13, 2016 8:55 pm

The new Neil Young album.Mainly based around his acoustic guitar with bass and drums from a couple of session players he does get his electric out on occasions for some crunching sounds. It seems rushed in places but it is very current with Neil protesting pipe lines through Native American land, water crisis,trigger happy police,xenophobia and in one of the strangest songs the Amazon Echo (at least I think that's what it's about) where he uses a vocoder to lament it's difficult set up.He also uses the auto tune to great effect on the standout track My Pledge.
It's OK overall not his best work but it will do.

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norrie
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