Chat talk and light discussion

Further proof the CDs days may be numbered

Wed Jun 01, 2016 3:50 pm

This site is all about CD collectors in general, and Elvis specifically. But will the CD soon be a thing of the past? Yesterday I went to my local FYE in NJ. What I saw was very disturbing. Only 2 aisles of CD racks (there were 4 for DVDs, 2 for vinyl and the rest of the store was action figures!). This from a store who's main inventory used to be made up of CDs. The selection was awful for every artist. Then today I came across this article:

http://www.avclub.com/article/start-say ... yer-213907

It doesnt look good for the future of CDs. Thoughts?

Re: Further proof the CDs days may be numbered

Wed Jun 01, 2016 4:13 pm

I used to really enjoy going into the Ernest Tubb Record Shop whenever I was in Pigeon Forge, Tennessee. Not so much anymore because their inventory has dwindled down to nothing and they do not seem to be in any hurry to restock. It's been that way for at least two years. At one time, it was one of the highlights of my Smoky Mountain trip.

As far as this Elvis CD collector goes, when the CD format goes out, I'm done. I won't be downloading anything. I've said before that I have enough CDs to enjoy the rest of my life. If I never added another one to the shelf, I'm more than satisfied with what I have.

It would be nice to have all of the "Elvis On Tour" material officially released by then.

Re: Further proof the CDs days may be numbered

Wed Jun 01, 2016 10:55 pm

CDs will disappear before LPs do, which is ironic if you recall all the publicity that surrounded CDs hitting retail in the 1980s.

Re: Further proof the CDs days may be numbered

Wed Jun 01, 2016 11:13 pm

drjohncarpenter wrote:CDs will disappear before LPs do, which is ironic if you recall all the publicity that surrounded CDs hitting retail in the 1980s.


And 20 years from then CDs will re-appear as LPs did during the vinyl revival.

Re: Further proof the CDs days may be numbered

Wed Jun 01, 2016 11:16 pm

I don't think the CD`s days are numbered quite yet. Not when sales via other formats and media aren't widely surpassing the CD with regards to album sales. In the UK the decline in CD sales actually slowed last year, although there most certainly has been a decline in the sales of CDs and DVDs in recent years. Some trends are, quite simply, inevitable.

When it comes to music, however, streaming is at the forefront of consumer trends and there it's bound to stay. Both with regards to audio and visual streaming platforms. And whilst 26.8 billion songs were audio streamed in the UK last year, along with 26.9 music video streams, on an album Vs. album basis, CDs were still the most popular format, with 53.6 million albums sold on CD in 2015. Compare this to the 40 million streamed albums, 26 million downloaded albums and 2.1 million vinyl albums sold. Whilst there's an unknown quantity in the used CD market, which seems to be thriving if Amazon feedback is anything to judge by. And in my opinion, it is.

I wouldn't be surprised if CD sales continue to decline, and when they're no longer popular or commercially viable they will go, but today there's more options than ever before, with everyone catered to in one way or another. Especially collectors, who are spoiled for choice in many ways with regards to their favourite artists or movies. Whilst music fans of practically every artist can hear new music in an instant when it's released, or buy something tangible in the form of a CD or LP if that's their choice. Which it most certainly was for the If I Can Dream album, the success of which speaks volumes not only with regards to Elvis’s popularity, but how significant CD sales continue to be, and how valuable a good marketing campaign is when done right.

Personally, I buy CDs, stream and download. Whilst buying Blu-rays on a regular basis. I don't stream movies because I prefer going to the cinema, but the option is there to do so, which is something studios and film institutes have wholly embraced. Still, we're living in a consumer's paradise that offers more to enjoy than lament in most instances.

Re: Further proof the CDs days may be numbered

Thu Jun 02, 2016 12:18 am

Mike C wrote:
drjohncarpenter wrote:CDs will disappear before LPs do, which is ironic if you recall all the publicity that surrounded CDs hitting retail in the 1980s.


And 20 years from then CDs will re-appear as LPs did during the vinyl revival.


I doubt that. The renewed interest in LPs is strongly based on aesthetic. There's an artistry to the format, from the size, art and presentation to the effort one must make to play and absorb the music. This was all lost with the CD age.

Re: Further proof the CDs days may be numbered

Mon Jun 13, 2016 10:01 pm

Greystoke wrote:I don't think the CD`s days are numbered quite yet. Not when sales via other formats and media aren't widely surpassing the CD with regards to album sales. In the UK the decline in CD sales actually slowed last year, although there most certainly has been a decline in the sales of CDs and DVDs in recent years. Some trends are, quite simply, inevitable.

When it comes to music, however, streaming is at the forefront of consumer trends and there it's bound to stay. Both with regards to audio and visual streaming platforms. And whilst 26.8 billion songs were audio streamed in the UK last year, along with 26.9 music video streams, on an album Vs. album basis, CDs were still the most popular format, with 53.6 million albums sold on CD in 2015. Compare this to the 40 million streamed albums, 26 million downloaded albums and 2.1 million vinyl albums sold. Whilst there's an unknown quantity in the used CD market, which seems to be thriving if Amazon feedback is anything to judge by. And in my opinion, it is.

I wouldn't be surprised if CD sales continue to decline, and when they're no longer popular or commercially viable they will go, but today there's more options than ever before, with everyone catered to in one way or another. Especially collectors, who are spoiled for choice in many ways with regards to their favourite artists or movies. Whilst music fans of practically every artist can hear new music in an instant when it's released, or buy something tangible in the form of a CD or LP if that's their choice. Which it most certainly was for the If I Can Dream album, the success of which speaks volumes not only with regards to Elvis’s popularity, but how significant CD sales continue to be, and how valuable a good marketing campaign is when done right.

Personally, I buy CDs, stream and download. Whilst buying Blu-rays on a regular basis. I don't stream movies because I prefer going to the cinema, but the option is there to do so, which is something studios and film institutes have wholly embraced. Still, we're living in a consumer's paradise that offers more to enjoy than lament in most instances.


I think the key thing is that CD and DVD/blu-ray sales are likely to decline and as good as fizzle out within certain genres, but I don't see this happening within other areas of music. Whilst I can see a time where a modern pop album - here today, likely gone tomorrow - has a stream or download only option, I don't say that happening for classical music or jazz, for example. The same is true when it comes to the latest blockbusters at the cinema. There might be a time when most people download or stream them - but I don't ever see that happening for classic films or even world cinema, and there are certainly no signs of the likes of Eureka, Olive Films, Kino, or Criterion slowing down their release schedules or even moving heavily into the non-physical formats at all.