Post here your Elvis' pictures

Tue Sep 25, 2007 3:32 am

drjohncarpenter wrote:
PEP wrote:http://eta247.tripod.com/goldlametoronto.mp3

PEP -- what is this? It's only 11.2 KB and does not play.


Hmm don't know what to say Doc, it seems to be working for me when I click on it.

You need a AOL media player to play this.

What this is, is audio form the Toronto show Elvis did in 57', we hear bit's of him singing "Heartbreak Hotel" in between two reporter's talking to some of the Canadian girls and guys.
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One Canadian girl is asked what she thinks of Elvis, her reply is that he is ugly but he sings good, man I just wonder what the F@@k she looked like and what she thought was good looking. :roll:

PEP 8)

Tue Sep 25, 2007 3:38 am

PEP wrote:What this is, is audio form the Toronto show Elvis did in 57', we hear bit's of him singing "Heartbreak Hotel" in between two reporter's talking to some of the Canadian girls and guys.

Ah, this audio from April 2, 1957 was released about ten years ago.

It was track 6 on the classic CD, When All Was Kool (Mystery Train) ->

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Tue Sep 25, 2007 1:32 pm

PEP
One Canadian girl is asked what she thinks of Elvis, her reply is that he is ugly but he sings good,

Could it be she was refering to his stages movements?
He was ugly, as in nasty, vulgar, offensive?
I've even read some reviews about the fifty's, that describe his on stage presents as barbaric.

Surly she could not be talking about his looks, as in handsome!
If she is,then it's the very first time i have ever heard someone,anyone saying that his face features were bad..

Tue Sep 25, 2007 3:47 pm

Elton wrote:PEP
One Canadian girl is asked what she thinks of Elvis, her reply is that he is ugly but he sings good,

Could it be she was refering to his stages movements?
He was ugly, as in nasty, vulgar, offensive?
I've even read some reviews about the fifty's, that describe his on stage presents as barbaric.

Surly she could not be talking about his looks, as in handsome!
If she is,then it's the very first time i have ever heard someone,anyone saying that his face features were bad..


Hmm I think we need someone who was a teenager during this period to let us know if this was an expression back then...

It does seem odd for a teenage girl to think of Elvis as being ugly.

I remember seeing a 60's interview where teenage Rolling Stone fans were asked what they thought of the Stones, an One girl spoke up and said "they are so ugly they are beautuful" or something like that.

PEP 8)

Wed Sep 26, 2007 2:09 pm

Aw The stones, still love 'em after all these years!
Fred & Wilma,just keep getting better!! :wink:

Wed Sep 26, 2007 9:14 pm

PEP wrote:It does seem odd for a teenage girl to think of Elvis as being ugly.

She may have mean it as a euphemism for being "tough" -- a la Brando or Dean. Remember how Elvis at the time mentioned how he noticed the true rebel actors never smiled? That might be what this gal was talking about.

Mon Oct 01, 2007 2:03 am

Though this thread was nearly killed, I really enjoyed this thread and opening picture which I've never seen before.

Again..great topic

Thx

Mon Oct 01, 2007 9:49 pm

E-Cat wrote:Though this thread was nearly killed, I really enjoyed this thread and opening picture which I've never seen before.

Again..great topic

Thx

Thanks a LOT, E-Cat.

Wed Oct 03, 2007 7:42 pm

drjohncarpenter wrote:
E-Cat wrote:Though this thread was nearly killed, I really enjoyed this thread and opening picture which I've never seen before.

Again..great topic

Thx

Thanks a LOT, E-Cat.


You are welcome Doc.

Here's another pic and review:

Cultural Invasion

Elvis Presley rocks Canada as teens embrace American pop culture

Fifteen-year-old Melinda McCracken lived in a Winnipeg suburb, listened to American rock and roll, and hung around Ellett’s, an American-style soda fountain. It was the 1950s, and United States pop culture had begun a concentrated invasion of Canada.

In April 1957, Elvis Presley's first tour outside of the United States brought the King of American pop culture to Canada. Pictured here, Elvis performing in Ottawa (City of Ottawa archives)

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"America appeared to be source of all good things, things that were magical and ingenious and fun -- Cokes, thirteen-inch hot dogs, sodas and milkshakes, soft ice cream, chocolate bars, Walt Disney’s lovable world full of cute characters, comic books, Hollywood movies."

Leading the invasion was the exploding world of television.

"When television arrived we got the full blast of American culture," remembered McCracken.

On September 4, 1952, Canada officially entered the television era when the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) went on the air. Variety shows like Don Messer’s Jubilee and drama series like the Plouffe Family celebrated the country’s talent and diversity. For the first time, Canadians saw their own country reflected back to them on television.

But most of the drama and entertainment the CBC carried, and Canadians watched, were American. The U.S. had begun regular television service in 1939, though its progress was largely halted by the war. But now the industry was booming and shows like Father Knows Best were dominating the airwaves.

Even rock and roll was buoyed by the medium, bringing American pop culture right into Canadian living-rooms. On September 9, 1956, millions of people saw Elvis Presley perform on the Ed Sullivan Show.

Wayne and Shuster were a popular Canadian comedy team who appeared on the CBC and on various American television shows in the 1950s, including a record 67 performances on the "The Ed Sullivan Show." Pictured here, Wayne and Shuster as puppets, 1955. (National Archives of Canada, PA-203477)

Teachers and preachers were outraged and many parents worried about the affect Presley and his raucous music were having of the moral fibre of their children. But Canadian teens like Carol Vanderleck were relishing a new carefree independence in the post-war boom times.

"It’s funny but the things parents don’t like about Elvis are exactly what we like most about him."

In April 1957, Elvis' first tour outside of the United States brought the King of American pop culture to Ottawa. The event raised new fears among Canadian parents, prompting a question by one Canadian reporter about Elvis' views on the teens of the day.

Reporter:
"Elvis, you’ve watched teenagers when they’ve been pretty excited. You’ve seen a lot of them. Have they lost a lot of their morals or are they just the same as they’ve been lots of other times?"

Elvis:
"No they haven’t. Maybe they’re growing up, you know and they’re having a nice time and nobody is going to stop that. I mean, the only way they’re going to stop that is for the United States to turn communist and I don’t think that’ll ever happen."

During the Elvis tour, at least one Ottawa high school, Notre-Dame Convent, took steps to protect the moral health of its pupils. Principal Sister Saint-John asked students to sign a pledge:

"I promise that I shall not take part in the reception accorded Elvis Presley and I shall not be present at the program presented by him."

Fifteen-year-old Louise Bowie signed the pledge but went to the Elvis show anyway.

" It was like, "wow"! Here was this person that I had seen on television, and I was seeing this person in person. I’d never seen people behave that way, screaming and jumping up and down and pulling their hair and looking like they were swooning."

The next day she faced the consequences.

"I went to school, the nun who was my teacher asked who went and I said I went. So she called me out into the hall and she told me I was no longer welcomed at the school and that my soul was condemned to hell. I was devastated."

Seven other girls were expelled that day. It was a humiliating experience for the teens but represented the dawning of a new era.

Elvis, like all American pop culture, had come to represent the freedom and carefree living of the post-war era. And Canadians seemed to have an insatiable appetite for "all thing good." In Canada, the march of American culture had started and would not be stopped.


http://history.cbc.ca/history/

Thu Oct 04, 2007 12:17 pm

Thanks E-Cat for posting the review. Although I have reviews from all but one or two of the 57 shows it's always great reading.

Sincerely
Brian
http://www.brian56.dk

Thu Oct 04, 2007 2:25 pm

Stories like the girl getting expelled from school, were almost a daily deal in the fiftys, from teachers who wanted to ban "All Shook Up" because the correct grammer should have read,All Shaken Up!!
Preachers,teachers,parents,seem to have it in for our hero, and he was just short of the Devil his-self!
I remember a local store which had the '56 bubble gums cards and a dislpay about them for sale,and after hearing/reading that Elvis had spit on the females in the front row, at a recent concert, went into a rage and begin to rip apart the display and ginding all Elvis items in the floor
A lot of this taking place with me been a teenage at the time only added fuel to da fire,I NOW HAD to check out about this dude and see what the fuss was all about,and it didn't take long to accept he was gonna be around for a while!!!
Never would have thought i would be still talking and learing about the man some 30 years later..
Just so you can relate with all the news,just about EVERDAY about Brittney well ...in the '50's IT WAS ELVIS!!!!

To be a teen in da 50's was a blessing. :D

Thu Oct 04, 2007 2:32 pm

Elton wrote:Stories like the girl getting expelled from school, were almost a daily deal in the fiftys, from teachers who wanted to ban "All Shook Up" because the correct grammer should have read,All Shaken Up!!


And don't forget, Love Me Tenderly !

But the 'wrong' titles are 100 times better than the 'right' ones !

Tue Oct 16, 2007 4:47 am

bripet56 wrote:Although I have reviews from all but one or two of the 57 shows ...

Which dates are you missing?