You can add here the info of Elvis in the media

Memphis Greats.

Wed Jun 29, 2005 11:50 am

Elvis and Martin Luther King, two Memphians in the top ten of 100 Greatest Americans. Soooooooooo....

http://news.google.ie/news?hl=en&ned=us ... earch+News

Wed Jun 29, 2005 7:05 pm

Reporter Scott Morris of the "Memphis Business Journal" is interested in covering this story....again:-)

http://news.google.ie/news?hl=en&ned=us ... earch+News

It's getting attention so far............a lot of hits!

Re: Memphis Greats.

Wed Jun 29, 2005 9:33 pm

MauriceinIreland wrote:Elvis and Martin Luther King, two Memphians in the top ten of 100 Greatest Americans. Soooooooooo....


MLK wasn't really a Memphian. He was born in Atlanta, and, although I don't know for certain, didn't spend a lot of time in Memphis during his lifetime. Of course, he died there, so perhaps he is most-associated with Memphis.

Wed Jun 29, 2005 9:51 pm

I'm surprised Milhouse Cronkite missed this one:

Shelby Foote, the historian and novelist who died Monday night in Memphis at age 88, may be the only TV star who wrote with a dip pen.

TV audiences discovered Foote in 1990 when he emerged as the star commentator in Ken Burns' epic PBS documentary The Civil War.

Foote had already spent 20 years writing his own epic, The Civil War: A Narrative, a three-volume, novel-like military history. And when it came to talking about the war, no one made it come alive like Foote did, with his soft, eloquent drawl.

Burns called him "the presiding spirit of the series," and ended up using 89 clips of Foote during the 11-hour documentary. TV made Foote the kind of celebrity that his books never did. He even made the cover of Newsweek.

He had a simple, if immodest explanation for his popularity on TV. "I really did know what I was talking about," he said. "I'm not worried about whether they like me or not, and that's a huge advantage. I wasn't self-conscious."

Foote did complain that after the PBS series "the damn telephone won't hush," but vowed not to let his newfound fame go to his head. "I saw what happened to Truman Capote, and that shouldn't have happened to a dog."

What did happen was that Foote's three-volume series sold like never before (some 800,000 copies after the TV series). The author returned to a slow-paced life in Memphis that included writing with a dip pen and inkwell.

A good day's work would produce about 500 well-chosen words.

The dip pen "makes me take my time, and I prize that," Foote explained in a 1990 interview with USA TODAY. "And it reduces the hell out of the need for rewriting."

Foote began his career as a novelist, concerned mostly with Southern history. But in 1954, Bennett Cerf, the legendary Random House publisher, asked him to write a short history of the Civil War. The book was expected to take about a year.

As Foote explained in a 1994 interview on C-SPAN, "I sat down to outline this short history and saw that I would be simply writing a summary and wouldn't be interested in doing it. So I wrote and told them at Random House that I'd be willing to go whole hog, spread eagle on the thing, three volumes."

He did, noting that it took longer to write the 2,934-page trilogy than it took to fight the war. It's the kind of history that only a novelist could write, rich in details and atmosphere. "I have employed the novelist's methods without his license," Foote said.

He visited the Civil War battlefields on the anniversaries of the battles "because the place is so different other times of the year. To understand the battle of Shiloh, if you went there when it was fought, in early April, you could see what it was like. ... You get the weather, you get the soil and you get the coloration of things, get the true feel of it."

Foote was born in segregated Mississippi and grew up with an appreciation of the old Southern aristocracy, but he was praised for his even-handed accounts of the battle between North and South.

"Anybody who's looked into it at all realizes that it truly is the outstanding event in American history, insofar as making us what we are," he said. "The (American) Revolution provided us with a Constitution; it broke us loose from England, it made us free. But the Civil War really defined us."

Through his life, Foote's favorite novel was Marcel Proust's epic, seven-volume Remembrance of Things Past. Foote's mother gave him a copy for this 17th birthday, and Foote said in a 1994 interview that he had reread it nine times.

Each time, he wrote on the flyleaf the date he had finished it. There's one 20-year gap — when he was writing The Civil War.

He's survived by his wife, Gwyn; a daughter, Margaret Shelby; and a son, Huger Lee.


Mr. Foote was an incredible writer.

Tom

Wed Jun 29, 2005 10:31 pm

I enjoyed his work on the Civil War documentaries, and he is soooo right about visiting the battlefields during the time of the year in which they were actually fought. I had that experience at Shiloh, and it really added a lot to the overall feel of the experience.

Wed Jun 29, 2005 11:01 pm

Elvis wasn't born in Memphis either:-) Maybe Tupelo Airport should be renamed?

Anyway I'm happy enough a lot of people are interested in the Memphis Airport topic.

http://news.google.ie/news?hl=en&ned=us ... earch+News

A Black Memphis Taxi driver one dark night in August 1997 took us to see the place where Martin Luther King was shot. Later as we drove back to our hotel we saw police lining up some black guys against a wall in a garage. We slowed down to look, and a car full of young blacks crashed into the back of our taxi! The young lady with us from BMG Dublin did not take it well. Her head had hit a door hard. She was bruised and frightened.

Luckily no damage was done to either car and the Taxi driver gave the kids a good dressing down. The police did not see what happened and we went our seperate ways. All of us relieved and happy to survive a little drama in Memphis.

Joe Jackson an Irish rock journalist travelling with us never mentioned the event in his Elvis articles or radio documentaries.

Tune in again soon:-)
Last edited by MauriceinIreland on Wed Jun 29, 2005 11:19 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Wed Jun 29, 2005 11:13 pm

I figured I would be given a reminder that Elvis wasn't born in Memphis. Trust me, I heard about the whole Tupelo thing. My point was that Elvis spent a considerable amount of time there, while MLK didn't.

Wed Jun 29, 2005 11:26 pm

Yes, just as I knew about Martin Luther King not being a real Memphian.

We all saw the Civil Rights history. And MLK's life covered in TV Documentaries. Many times.

But King is now associated with Memphis, for good, or bad.

http://news.google.ie/news?hl=en&ned=us ... earch+News

Wed Jun 29, 2005 11:34 pm

MauriceinIreland wrote:Elvis wasn't born in Memphis either:-) Maybe Tupelo Airport should be renamed?

Anyway I'm happy enough a lot of people are interested in the Memphis Airport topic.

http://news.google.ie/news?hl=en&ned=us ... earch+News

A Black Memphis Taxi driver one dark night in August 1997 took us to see the place where Martin Luther King was shot. Later as we drove back to our hotel we saw police lining up some black guys against a wall in a garage. We slowed down to look, and a car full of young blacks crashed into the back of our taxi! The young lady with us from BMG Dublin did not take it well. Her head had hit a door hard. She was bruised and frightened.

Luckily no damage was done to either car and the Taxi driver gave the kids a good dressing down. The police did not see what happened and we went our seperate ways. All of us relieved and happy to survive a little drama in Memphis.

Joe Jackson an Irish rock journalist travelling with us never mentioned the event in his Elvis articles or radio documentaries.

Tune in again soon:-)


I'm disappointed in that story on numerous accounts Maurice.

Why not mention the color of the car that crashed into you ?

Perhaps the lady from BMG wouldn't have suffered such injuries if the car that hit the one you were in had been a different color !

Wed Jun 29, 2005 11:44 pm

The car that crashed into us looked black too, but in the dark:-) ?

Our taxi was mustard or yellowish. Anyway the flashing police lights tended to add the blues to it all:-(

The taxi driver was grey haired and elderly, but had he a great vocabulary! The young black guys were obviously high on something.

It was a night, such a night it was, it really was.............. Happy birthday! Late I know, but it's the thought that counts.

http://news.google.ie/news?hl=en&ned=us ... EY&ie=UTF-

Thu Jun 30, 2005 1:56 am

Thanks, though I'm not convinced you looked passed my subtleness in the way I chose my words.

Being slightly more blunt I thought that post of yours was bang out of order and I don't see what difffernece the color of your car would have made just as much as the color of the persons skin driving it or anyone else for that matter.

Why didn't you mention the color of the skin of the lady from BMG, or your wife or yourself ?

Why was it so important to you to only point out the color of the skin on the occassions where it seemed the only color of someone that is relevant to say is that of black ?

Why didn't you chose to say:
"...and a car full of young blacks crashed into the back of our [enter color here] folks' mustard coloured taxi! The young [enter color here] lady with us [enter color here] folk from BMG Dublin did not take it well."

Thu Jun 30, 2005 2:07 am

Steve_M wrote:Thanks, though I'm not convinced you looked passed my subtleness in the way I chose my words.

Being slightly more blunt I thought that post of yours was bang out of order and I don't see what difffernece the color of your car would have made just as much as the color of the persons skin driving it or anyone else for that matter.

Why didn't you mention the color of the skin of the lady from BMG, or your wife or yourself ?

Why was it so important to you to only point out the color of the skin on the occassions where it seemed the only color of someone that is relevant to say is that of black ?

Why didn't you chose to say:
"...and a car full of young blacks crashed into the back of our [enter color here] folks' mustard coloured taxi! The young [enter color here] lady with us [enter color here] folk from BMG Dublin did not take it well."


STEVE.. you have to bear in mind.. MC is of a generation that does not know the meaning of political correctness, or he`s pig ignorant in bringing colour into his posts....shame on him, and his ilk :wink:

:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

Thu Jun 30, 2005 2:15 am

Then that generation is responsible for us having to bring in "political correctness" though I wouldn't call this that myself but one of plaiin courtesy and respect.

If it wasn't for that old school of ignorance we wouldn't have to have endured such a thing as "political correctness" in the first place.

It just smacked of an air of "second class" people in the post, you know, like it needed to be pointed out as if it was relevant.

Yeah, I'm quite riled about it. :evil:

Thu Jun 30, 2005 3:07 am

Steve_M wrote:Then that generation is responsible for us having to bring in "political correctness" though I wouldn't call this that myself but one of plaiin courtesy and respect.

If it wasn't for that old school of ignorance we wouldn't have to have endured such a thing as "political correctness" in the first place.

It just smacked of an air of "second class" people in the post, you know, like it needed to be pointed out as if it was relevant.

Yeah, I'm quite riled about it. :evil:


Like minded..Steve....I cant understand those people who use the race card, if you prick us.. dont we bleed the same colour?.. I am thankful I was brought up to respect others, that does not mean I can sit back and watch other`s spout their bigotry, MC you are of an age that in our youth did not come across many "coloured" people.. you need to have a good look at your posts from now on, think before you spout :wink:

:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

Thu Jun 30, 2005 8:19 am

Well well, lets not be coy then.

The Memphis tale was just an anecdote without any agenda whatsoever the fact you pretend to take it so seriously reveals your motivation.

As innocents in the famous city we had been warned certain areas of Memphis after dark were very dangerous, especially for tourists. It was our first visit.

We had been to the Elvis Concert at the Mid-South Coliseum that particular night and taxis were extremely rare so it was actually well after midnight when we finally managed to get one. The Memphis taxi driver was a very nice and informative guy.

Nevertheless the white young lady who works for BMG was already very apprehensive indeed. The crowd including all the media people had gone and just a few of us were left desperately watching for taxis. It had been a very hot day and we were all a little tired not to say a little overwhelmed by the exciting Elvis Concert. The BMG lady in charge of the purse strings felt responsible for us all, although she was much younger than our own children!

I find the racist slur nothing short of disgraceful. I'm surprised at you Steve_M. Surely you think a little deeper than that?

The great many adult and young black/coloured people I worked alongside in Manchester UK for decades would be laughing their socks off at the tone of your replies.

As for modern day political correctness...it's absolute nonsense!

The Irish suffered racism for many centuries (And still do - in our own country!)

My friends in Africa, the West Indies, China, and my Jewish wife would find your comments (based on such little evidence) very stupid indeed. To say the least.


Meanwhile my friends in India have the Elvis Airport story top on google.com Elvis news.

http://news.google.ie/news?hl=en&ned=us ... earch+News

Thu Jun 30, 2005 11:03 am

Bollocks. You didn't even answer a single question I put to you either.

I'll rephrase it for you if you found it so difficult.

In your original post about this tale you told, how or where was it relevant that the color of someones skin only needed to be mentioned when it was black ?

Thu Jun 30, 2005 11:34 am

Sorry, I did not realise the inquisition was back!

Who the hell do you think you are, you insignificant YOUNG creep?

Now I know how Elvis must have felt being labeled a racist.

I do not have to answer to any idiot on this message board!!! Is that plain enough english for you, and your like!

http://tennesseedaily.com/p.x/ct/10/id/ca80f72a3dd6ba88

Thu Jun 30, 2005 11:44 am

MauriceinIreland wrote:Who the hell do you think you are, you insignificant YOUNG creep?


Can you tell me how you want the answer put and could you direct me specifically to the area that most interests you as that could be a mighty long answer.

MauriceinIreland wrote:I do not have to answer to any idiot on this message board!!!


Thanks for that statement, I'm unsure why you gave it as it wasn't requested and seems to have no relevance, unless someone has told you that you do have to answer. If so, please give names we can sort that out for you.

MauriceinIreland wrote:Is that plain enough english for you, and your like!


No, not really.

I hope you appreciate the answers I've given to your questions and also the promptness of them.

I hope you are not only capable of returning the same but that you also could try and not do the avoidance manouveur and get back onto why you feel it is only necessary to mention the color of peoples skin when it is black and when you give no relevance to doing so either.

Creeps come in all ages, I don't see the point of being ageist either Mo Co.

Also, I'm just a human being, nothing special about me, I'm no better and no worse than any other. I am as significant as the next human being.

You have stated I'm insignificant without any qualification what-so-ever.

Thu Jun 30, 2005 12:02 pm

Image


Word games! Your intention was clear to everyone with an understanding of English.

I'm far too busy to give your childish questions any further attention as they deserved none in the first place!

Photo above, August 17th? 1997 Blue Light Studio Memphis.

Thu Jun 30, 2005 12:14 pm

I am not suggesting you are racist IF that is what you are implying!

Please don't beat around the bush Mo. If my intentions are so clear then why can't you spell them out ?

I still believe your original post failed to point out the relevance. Maybe an oversight on your part - so rather than leave it at that I highlighted it so that your name was not gragged down to levels it doesn't deserve and gave you the chance then to qualify what you said.

So far you don't seem to appreciate that and also don't wish to qualify the relevance.

Tell you what Mo, either you give a basic relevant simple answer to my simple question on here or at least one of us won't be doing so in future anyway.

Thu Jun 30, 2005 12:31 pm

So be it Mo.

I'd rather it was this way than anyting clouded and muddied and confusing.

Due to the terms under which everyone joined I have a duty to investigate complaints when I'm approached.

In order to understand as much as I can I have to ask questions in order to enlighten myself.

As you decided to show me what you thought of me and the position I was granted by saying:
Who the hell do you think you are, you insignificant YOUNG creep?


then you have left me no options left after I've exhausted the ones I had.

Thu Jun 30, 2005 1:56 pm

Obviously you mean to make a mountain out of a molehill.

Describing the sense of menace we felt because tourist are warned to stay away from certain places in Memphis usually African American or whatever description you feel is right I quite innocently pointed out we were more or less surrounded by coloured people, in the dead of nght.

I'm no shrinking violet having grown up in quite a violent area of Manchester, but Memphis is quite different as we all know.

The best solution is too delete the whole thread as I don't have the time to go into a long explanation (As if one was needed) Or do what you feel you must.

I don't care either way.

Thu Jun 30, 2005 4:39 pm

Geez, now I'm confused. Milhouse sounds like any other moronic racist when he writes, but then he shows us a picture of him standing right next to an actual real live black man. Now I just don't know what to think.

Tom

P.S. Notice that Milhouse is holding his wallet in the picture, probably because he was afraid it would get stolen. :wink:

Thu Jun 30, 2005 4:55 pm

Steve_M, Now you see the damage stupidity can cause. Even the liar himself, believes!!!

He cannot see the autograph book i'm holding clearly either, and I'm the one with the specs. LOL

http://news.google.ie/news?hl=en&ned=us ... earch+News

Thu Jun 30, 2005 5:06 pm

Jeez, what a thread. :roll:

It strikes me that Maurice was just being descriptive. For those of us who've been to Memphis, it pays to not go in as a naive, "people are people," attitude. Keep that in your heart, but watch your freaking back. I've had black people take me aside to tell me about other black people I was talking to (total hustlers) in and around Poplar Tunes and on Beale Street, at day and night. They actually helped me get out of some slippery situations as a youth who was clouded with a lot of guilty liberal notions at the time.

I'm sorry to disagree with you, Steve, but Maurice's story was pretty innocent. I used to rush to the barricades the same way everytime I detected a note of possible bias, but, older and wiser, I have officially grown weary. I'm sorry to sound like that, but I've done a 180 of late, realizing that nobody is an angel to be tiptoed around...

Folks, do take in the National Civil Rights Museum when you're down in Memphis. Phenomenal. It's chilling to be at the old motel Rev. King was assassinated at, and the whole experience is quite moving. And, yes, a reminder of actual racism against African-Americans in America.

Keep On Pushin' :!: