Re: "Dark Moon" --> Elvis Takes On Bonnie Guitar

Mon Dec 10, 2012 1:46 am

monkboughtlunch wrote:Has the source tape been used for any CD release? Or was the source tape lost and NoNoised via a computer to remove the acetate static and pops? Anyone know what source was used on the Complete Masters box? Is it edited on CM or complete?

Not that I'm aware.

The 1966 home recordings as featured on 'A Golden Celebration' [1984] and 'The Home Recordings' [1999] are BOTH derived from an acetate source [surface noise can still be heard on the latter].
However, on 'THR' said tracks appear to have been cleaned up a touch, although are quite heavily noise reduced in the process. .

Re: "Dark Moon" --> Elvis Takes On Bonnie Guitar

Mon Dec 10, 2012 3:16 am

The return over and over again to the chorus reminds me most of his unwillingness to let o of I'll Hold You In My Heart and the take of You'll Never Walk Alone on Platinum. In both of these cases, and Dark Moon, Presley's joy of music-making shines through.

Re: "Dark Moon" --> Elvis Takes On Bonnie Guitar

Mon Dec 10, 2012 4:11 pm

elvisalisellers wrote:
monkboughtlunch wrote:Has the source tape been used for any CD release? Or was the source tape lost and NoNoised via a computer to remove the acetate static and pops? Anyone know what source was used on the Complete Masters box? Is it edited on CM or complete?

Not that I'm aware.

The 1966 home recordings as featured on 'A Golden Celebration' [1984] and 'The Home Recordings' [1999] are BOTH derived from an acetate source [surface noise can still be heard on the latter].
However, on 'THR' said tracks appear to have been cleaned up a touch, although are quite heavily noise reduced in the process. .


Does the original tape still exist? What source was used for Complete Masters that Reidel apparently mastered?

Re: "Dark Moon" --> Elvis Takes On Bonnie Guitar

Mon Dec 10, 2012 10:47 pm

monkboughtlunch wrote:
elvisalisellers wrote:
monkboughtlunch wrote:Has the source tape been used for any CD release? Or was the source tape lost and NoNoised via a computer to remove the acetate static and pops? Anyone know what source was used on the Complete Masters box? Is it edited on CM or complete?

Not that I'm aware.

The 1966 home recordings as featured on 'A Golden Celebration' [1984] and 'The Home Recordings' [1999] are BOTH derived from an acetate source [surface noise can still be heard on the latter].
However, on 'THR' said tracks appear to have been cleaned up a touch, although are quite heavily noise reduced in the process.


Does the original tape still exist? What source was used for Complete Masters that Reidel apparently mastered?

No idea. Have you tried asking Ernst?

TCM is still from the acetate source.

Re: "Dark Moon" --> Elvis Takes On Bonnie Guitar

Sat Sep 17, 2016 10:05 am

.

Just love this kind of threads. And I'm glad to inform you that (according to Wikipedia), Bonnie Guitar is still with us. Aged 93. (Here active years were from 1956 - 1996).

When Bonnie's rendition of "Dark Moon" hit the country and pop charts in the Spring of 1957, she received recognition in the music business. Not only was she one of the few female Country singers in Country Music at the time, but she was also one of the few Country singers that had a hit on the Country and Pop charts at the same time.

Only one other female country singer was achieving this type of crossover success Guitar was having at the time, which was Patsy Cline, when her single "Walkin' After Midnight" was a No. 2 Country hit and a No. 12 Pop hit at the same time. "Dark Moon" brought Guitar a wide audience, and she was soon appearing on quite a few Pop Music programs. Similar to Patsy Cline, Bonnie couldn't follow-up her crossover success either. Her follow-up to "Dark Moon" called "Mister Fire Eyes" failed to make a substantial impact on the Pop charts, making it only to No. 71 there. On the Country charts though, it was again a Top 15 hit. Because she couldn't follow-up her crossover success, her contract soon ended with Dot Records, and Guitar returned to Washington

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bonnie_Guitar

.

Re: "Dark Moon" --> Elvis Takes On Bonnie Guitar

Wed Sep 28, 2016 5:37 am

colonel snow wrote:The song was recorded too on 13-04-57 by Hawkshaw Hawkins (RCA 20-6910); the version of Gale Storm was recorded on 06-04-57 (Dot 15558) while Bonnie Guitar recorded her version in jan. 1957 (Dot 15550).


colonel snow


colonel snow, may I ask, how do you come up with these obscure recordings / recording dates by a number of other artists? I've noticed that you've done this a number of times.

drjohncarpenter wrote:
colonel snow wrote:The song was recorded too on 13-04-57 by Hawkshaw Hawkins (RCA 20-6910); the version of Gale Storm was recorded on 06-04-57 (Dot 15558) while Bonnie Guitar recorded her version in jan. 1957 (Dot 15550).

It's interesting that Storm covered Guitar's version, and they were both on the Dot label!


Just curious, what makes it so interesting that they were both on the Dot label? The reason I ask is because it really isn't that common. It may be as simple as both artists had a common point person who was able to work out a suitable publishing deal for the song. I don't think it is any different than RCA artists Toni Arden and The Turtles recording both sides of Elvis' final Sun single "I Forgot To Remember To Forget" (Arden) / "Mystery Train" (The Turtles) that was reissued by RCA in late 1955. Likewise, I don't think it is any different than Elvis recording a number of hit songs from other RCA recording artists in the 1960s and 1970s primarily, including any number of Eddy Arnold covers, including "It's A Sin," "You Don't Know Me," Make The World Go Away," Don Gibson's "I Can't Stop Loving You," Jerry Reed's "Guitar Man," "U.S. Male," "A Thing Called Love," and "Talk About The Good Times," Tony Perkins' "Moonlight Swim," Sons Of The Pioneers' "How Great Thou Art," Odetta's "Tomorrow Is A Long Time," Ray Peterson's "The Wonder Of You," Jimmy Elledge's "Funny How Time Slips Away," Perry Como's "It's Impossible" and "And I Love You So," Roger Whitaker's "The Last Farewell," and Jim Reeves "He'll Have To Go." You can also throw in things such as the attempts at Ed Ames' "When The Snow Is On The Roses," Waylon Jennings' "We Had It All" and Morris Albert's "Feelings." You even see it with the unused January, 1969 Elvis track "Come Out, Come Out (Wherever You Are)" that was recorded by Young & Company.

Re: "Dark Moon" --> Elvis Takes On Bonnie Guitar

Wed Sep 28, 2016 7:54 am

It's interesting because at the time, a cover of someone else's hit was seldom, if ever, another act from the same label, in the same genre. Your other examples are something quite different.