Re: Elvis Was Still #1 In 1977

Sun Jun 06, 2010 7:47 am

Juan Luis wrote:In small venues as well! Image


I'm confused (but that's not unusual). If 9,600 tickets were sold at $10 to $15 each, how could the gross be $264,000? It shouldn't be over $143,995. I suppose Billboard combined the revenue from both days in Chicago, without combining the number of tickets sold for both shows.

Re: Elvis Was Still #1 In 1977

Sun Jun 06, 2010 7:57 am

Joe Car wrote:
ric of greensboro wrote:"The Eagles were playing stadiums while Elvis was playing arenas in Lincoln Nebraska. I’ll take The Eagles in 1977",thats true but the eagles played greensboro in 77 and so did elvis both shows sold out so what . i remember there was alot of attention for elvis in 77 no matter what town , if elvis wanted to play stadiums i'm sure he sell them out also :mrgreen: also in 75 in my city we played host to led zep, the stones , elton john , and elvis , so just because elvis played cities like greensboro, charlotte , jacksonville , every year should not matter, i would bet the eagles or skinner "which NEVER sold out in greensboro" could keep up that pace ::rocks


I think we have to keep in mind that our guy was a few months from being dead, while these other great acts, (which they were) were in their prime.


True, but at the time nobody really knew for sure that Elvis' days were numbered.

Re: Elvis Was Still #1 In 1977

Sun Jun 06, 2010 9:00 am

3577 wrote:Whenever the Elvis Presley Show came to town in the 1970s, it was a guaranteed sellout. More than that, as soon as Elvis tickets went on sale in a community, people invariably lined up and bought all the available tickets within a few hours. Most of those in line were Elvis fans just happy for the chance to see their idol in a live performance. But also standing in those lines were a different group of people, who were also happy to know Elvis was coming to town—the ticket scalpers. Elvis was the King to them, too. They were guaranteed big profits selling Elvis concert tickets above the box office price.

For example, consider Elvis’s scheduled May 29, 1977, concert at the Baltimore Civic Center. Tickets, scaled with a top of $15 per, went on sale over a month earlier and sold out the same day. The take for the 12,700-seat Civic Center was $179,350, a record for a live performance at the facility. (Frank Sinatra held the previous record at $126,555.)

Immediately after the tickets sold out, they went back on sale, this time illegally. In an April 20, 1977, article, Variety reported that, “The vet singer’s appearance here has generated record illicit prices as scalpers, professional and otherwise, gathered the chutzpah to go public with classified ads in a Sunday newspaper.” Of course, details of such illicit ticket sales are hard to come by, but it is known that one scalper who advertised $15 tickets for “best offer” received offers up to $100 per ducat.

Although there was a strict 10-ticket limit at the box office for Elvis’s Baltimore appearance, the professional scalpers were able to accumulate much more than that. One classified advertiser told a radio reporter that he had 67 Elvis tickets for sale at $40 each, with the price guaranteed to increase as the concert date approached. One newspaper, The News American, refused to accept the scalpers’ ads.

Of course, all the tickets held by scalpers were moved for a healthy profit. Colonel Parker could hardly object, considering he had been known to hold out tickets for Elvis’s concerts and sell them for his personal profit. Certainly, hundreds of those Elvis fans who were still standing in line when the box office put out the “sold out” sign had no qualms about paying multiple times the issue price for tickets in Baltimore that spring in 1977. After all, for many it was a once in a lifetime chance to see Elvis Presley in person. The scalpers could have charged even higher prices and gotten them had they and their customers known that Elvis would die just a few months later.


When Elvis first South Carolina show in 20 years went on sale in early 1977, the 12,000+ tickets sold out in 20 minutes. That was in pre-Ticketmaster days, so our neighbor agreed to sit overnight in a parking lot (in freezing weather) to be first in line, but other people had the same idea and she ended up seventh or eighth. She got six (the limit) very good seats for $12.50 each, and only two more people in line behind her got tickets before the concert sold out.

To make a short story long, the way it worked back then was that each major city in the state had a designated ticket seller for the coliseum in Columbia. These local agents were given a very limited number of hard tickets, then the rest were sold by telephone. Charleston's seller was a "Book Bag" book store, and the clerks there would call a number to the arena's box office, and if they were lucky enough to get through, they could take the payment (cash only, no credit-cards or checks) to secure seats, and the tickets would be mailed from the promoter to the buyer. After a few sales, the main box-office agent would just hang up, then take calls from other stores around the state, so one seller or city didn't get favored over another. The local store clerk would then try to call in again, and if they got through, the process would repeat.

Anyway, we left early on the way to the show, which was about a 90 minute drive from our house, so my parents could get their car (a '76 Thunderbird) serviced at the Ford dealer they bought it from a few months before, which was about mid-way between Charleston and Columbia. We got to the dealership, and the owner came out to chat, and when he found out we were going to see Elvis, he said his wife would love to go, and offered us $100 each for our three tickets. My jerk of a stepfather wanted to take it, so my mother said, "No, my son really wants to see him." At that point the dealer said, "Fine, I'll give you $300 and your son can go with us!" Luckily, my mother then said, "No, I really want to see him too!"

We went, and even my stepfather later admitted he was glad we hadn't sold the tickets. Elvis may not have been at the top of his game, and it's easy to see that now that we are able to hear it on bootlegs, but it was an unforgettable night. I've seen many better concerts since, including over 20 Springsteen shows, but Elvis just had some kind of charisma that I've never seen in anybody else, and I am so very glad I got to see him that night. So Mrs. Albers, thanks again for camping out in that parking lot.

Garry

Re: Elvis Was Still #1 In 1977

Sun Jun 06, 2010 1:47 pm

imthcat wrote:
Juan Luis wrote:In small venues as well! Image


I'm confused (but that's not unusual). If 9,600 tickets were sold at $10 to $15 each, how could the gross be $264,000? It shouldn't be over $143,995. I suppose Billboard combined the revenue from both days in Chicago, without combining the number of tickets sold for both shows.


There's a typo in this article, attendance was 19600..

Cheers.

Re: Elvis Was Still #1 In 1977

Sun Jun 06, 2010 1:55 pm

imthcat wrote:Elvis may not have been at the top of his game, and it's easy to see that now that we are able to hear it on bootlegs, but it was an unforgettable night. I've seen many better concerts since, including over 20 Springsteen shows, but Elvis just had some kind of charisma that I've never seen in anybody else, and I am so very glad I got to see him that night.

Garry


Thanks for your story.

I would have preferred a 1977 Elvis concert over any other act in the business.
Elvis didn't have the best act, was in questionable condition and only did a 65 minute show.
But seeing and hearing Elvis live would have been one of the most special moments in my life.
I think when Elvis stepped out of the curtains after 2001, I wouldn't bother thinking "I wish I was at an Eagles concert"
(When Sherill started "O sole mio" it may have slipped my mind for a couple of seconds though :| )

I'm a broad music lover by the way and visit several rock concerts each year..

Re: Elvis Was Still #1 In 1977

Sun Jun 06, 2010 2:07 pm

Looks like this topic turns into Elvis Presley vs The Eagles/Lynyrd Skynyrd.

It's very easy, so not fair, wich concert you go, 33 years later. In other words, it's impossible to say now, what your thoughts would have been in 1977 about music. Even more, 1969. How old would you be, people on this forum being now 40/50? Ridiculous thought. Not realistic at all. I've listened to soundboard recordings from The Eagles, Rolling Stones, Led Zeppelin, KISS, The Doors, etc. from their prime-days. You think all those concerts were flawless? NO! You think it was attractive to look at 5 ugly sons of bitc**s, like The Rolling Stones? It was the music. For Elvis, especially 1977, it was the other way around. Overweight or not, he blew everyone away with his presence. And not everything wasn't bad, musically. 1977 has some musically/vocally highlights.

Midnightx is choosing Lynyrd Skynyrd and The Eagles above Elvis. (what else is new) That's no problem. But not realistic. Totally different music compared to Elvis. Elvis gave 1 hour concerts, other artists/bands, more, etc. Don't mix up your personal favourite with reality.

Re: Elvis Was Still #1 In 1977

Sun Jun 06, 2010 2:17 pm

imthcat wrote:
3577 wrote:Whenever the Elvis Presley Show came to town in the 1970s, it was a guaranteed sellout. More than that, as soon as Elvis tickets went on sale in a community, people invariably lined up and bought all the available tickets within a few hours. Most of those in line were Elvis fans just happy for the chance to see their idol in a live performance. But also standing in those lines were a different group of people, who were also happy to know Elvis was coming to town—the ticket scalpers. Elvis was the King to them, too. They were guaranteed big profits selling Elvis concert tickets above the box office price.

For example, consider Elvis’s scheduled May 29, 1977, concert at the Baltimore Civic Center. Tickets, scaled with a top of $15 per, went on sale over a month earlier and sold out the same day. The take for the 12,700-seat Civic Center was $179,350, a record for a live performance at the facility. (Frank Sinatra held the previous record at $126,555.)

Immediately after the tickets sold out, they went back on sale, this time illegally. In an April 20, 1977, article, Variety reported that, “The vet singer’s appearance here has generated record illicit prices as scalpers, professional and otherwise, gathered the chutzpah to go public with classified ads in a Sunday newspaper.” Of course, details of such illicit ticket sales are hard to come by, but it is known that one scalper who advertised $15 tickets for “best offer” received offers up to $100 per ducat.

Although there was a strict 10-ticket limit at the box office for Elvis’s Baltimore appearance, the professional scalpers were able to accumulate much more than that. One classified advertiser told a radio reporter that he had 67 Elvis tickets for sale at $40 each, with the price guaranteed to increase as the concert date approached. One newspaper, The News American, refused to accept the scalpers’ ads.

Of course, all the tickets held by scalpers were moved for a healthy profit. Colonel Parker could hardly object, considering he had been known to hold out tickets for Elvis’s concerts and sell them for his personal profit. Certainly, hundreds of those Elvis fans who were still standing in line when the box office put out the “sold out” sign had no qualms about paying multiple times the issue price for tickets in Baltimore that spring in 1977. After all, for many it was a once in a lifetime chance to see Elvis Presley in person. The scalpers could have charged even higher prices and gotten them had they and their customers known that Elvis would die just a few months later.


When Elvis first South Carolina show in 20 years went on sale in early 1977, the 12,000+ tickets sold out in 20 minutes. That was in pre-Ticketmaster days, so our neighbor agreed to sit overnight in a parking lot (in freezing weather) to be first in line, but other people had the same idea and she ended up seventh or eighth. She got six (the limit) very good seats for $12.50 each, and only two more people in line behind her got tickets before the concert sold out.

To make a short story long, the way it worked back then was that each major city in the state had a designated ticket seller for the coliseum in Columbia. These local agents were given a very limited number of hard tickets, then the rest were sold by telephone. Charleston's seller was a "Book Bag" book store, and the clerks there would call a number to the arena's box office, and if they were lucky enough to get through, they could take the payment (cash only, no credit-cards or checks) to secure seats, and the tickets would be mailed from the promoter to the buyer. After a few sales, the main box-office agent would just hang up, then take calls from other stores around the state, so one seller or city didn't get favored over another. The local store clerk would then try to call in again, and if they got through, the process would repeat.

Anyway, we left early on the way to the show, which was about a 90 minute drive from our house, so my parents could get their car (a '76 Thunderbird) serviced at the Ford dealer they bought it from a few months before, which was about mid-way between Charleston and Columbia. We got to the dealership, and the owner came out to chat, and when he found out we were going to see Elvis, he said his wife would love to go, and offered us $100 each for our three tickets. My jerk of a stepfather wanted to take it, so my mother said, "No, my son really wants to see him." At that point the dealer said, "Fine, I'll give you $300 and your son can go with us!" Luckily, my mother then said, "No, I really want to see him too!"

We went, and even my stepfather later admitted he was glad we hadn't sold the tickets. Elvis may not have been at the top of his game, and it's easy to see that now that we are able to hear it on bootlegs, but it was an unforgettable night. I've seen many better concerts since, including over 20 Springsteen shows, but Elvis just had some kind of charisma that I've never seen in anybody else, and I am so very glad I got to see him that night. So Mrs. Albers, thanks again for camping out in that parking lot.

Garry


That's a great story.Thanks for sharing it.It's stating the obvious that Elvis' live shows were certainly subpar during 77,especially compared to his own standards.Yet I think going to see an Elvis concert was so much more than the actual content of the performance.Regardless of his appearance or performance level.His shows were an event.It really did seem like you were going to see something special.Elvis just had some kind of magic about him,and it was still there right up until the last concert.He just had the ability to connect with the fans and inspire awe and devotion.I've been a fan for 35 years since I was 7 years old.I still have a hard time explaining why I still care about him so much or why I've spent so much time and money over the years on Elvis.For me he just had something radiate out from him that no other artist has ever come close to matching.Many other acts were in fact putting on much better shows in 77.You can even say they were giving their fans more bang for their buck when they bought their tickets.Yet,I would have bought a ticket to Elvis' show first every time.Even if all he did was walk across the stage for 30 seconds.Elvis seemed that important back then and still does to me.I think many fans feel like that.

Re: Elvis Was Still #1 In 1977

Sun Jun 06, 2010 3:30 pm

jak wrote:
imthcat wrote:
3577 wrote:Whenever the Elvis Presley Show came to town in the 1970s, it was a guaranteed sellout. More than that, as soon as Elvis tickets went on sale in a community, people invariably lined up and bought all the available tickets within a few hours. Most of those in line were Elvis fans just happy for the chance to see their idol in a live performance. But also standing in those lines were a different group of people, who were also happy to know Elvis was coming to town—the ticket scalpers. Elvis was the King to them, too. They were guaranteed big profits selling Elvis concert tickets above the box office price.

For example, consider Elvis’s scheduled May 29, 1977, concert at the Baltimore Civic Center. Tickets, scaled with a top of $15 per, went on sale over a month earlier and sold out the same day. The take for the 12,700-seat Civic Center was $179,350, a record for a live performance at the facility. (Frank Sinatra held the previous record at $126,555.)

Immediately after the tickets sold out, they went back on sale, this time illegally. In an April 20, 1977, article, Variety reported that, “The vet singer’s appearance here has generated record illicit prices as scalpers, professional and otherwise, gathered the chutzpah to go public with classified ads in a Sunday newspaper.” Of course, details of such illicit ticket sales are hard to come by, but it is known that one scalper who advertised $15 tickets for “best offer” received offers up to $100 per ducat.

Although there was a strict 10-ticket limit at the box office for Elvis’s Baltimore appearance, the professional scalpers were able to accumulate much more than that. One classified advertiser told a radio reporter that he had 67 Elvis tickets for sale at $40 each, with the price guaranteed to increase as the concert date approached. One newspaper, The News American, refused to accept the scalpers’ ads.

Of course, all the tickets held by scalpers were moved for a healthy profit. Colonel Parker could hardly object, considering he had been known to hold out tickets for Elvis’s concerts and sell them for his personal profit. Certainly, hundreds of those Elvis fans who were still standing in line when the box office put out the “sold out” sign had no qualms about paying multiple times the issue price for tickets in Baltimore that spring in 1977. After all, for many it was a once in a lifetime chance to see Elvis Presley in person. The scalpers could have charged even higher prices and gotten them had they and their customers known that Elvis would die just a few months later.


When Elvis first South Carolina show in 20 years went on sale in early 1977, the 12,000+ tickets sold out in 20 minutes. That was in pre-Ticketmaster days, so our neighbor agreed to sit overnight in a parking lot (in freezing weather) to be first in line, but other people had the same idea and she ended up seventh or eighth. She got six (the limit) very good seats for $12.50 each, and only two more people in line behind her got tickets before the concert sold out.

To make a short story long, the way it worked back then was that each major city in the state had a designated ticket seller for the coliseum in Columbia. These local agents were given a very limited number of hard tickets, then the rest were sold by telephone. Charleston's seller was a "Book Bag" book store, and the clerks there would call a number to the arena's box office, and if they were lucky enough to get through, they could take the payment (cash only, no credit-cards or checks) to secure seats, and the tickets would be mailed from the promoter to the buyer. After a few sales, the main box-office agent would just hang up, then take calls from other stores around the state, so one seller or city didn't get favored over another. The local store clerk would then try to call in again, and if they got through, the process would repeat.

Anyway, we left early on the way to the show, which was about a 90 minute drive from our house, so my parents could get their car (a '76 Thunderbird) serviced at the Ford dealer they bought it from a few months before, which was about mid-way between Charleston and Columbia. We got to the dealership, and the owner came out to chat, and when he found out we were going to see Elvis, he said his wife would love to go, and offered us $100 each for our three tickets. My jerk of a stepfather wanted to take it, so my mother said, "No, my son really wants to see him." At that point the dealer said, "Fine, I'll give you $300 and your son can go with us!" Luckily, my mother then said, "No, I really want to see him too!"

We went, and even my stepfather later admitted he was glad we hadn't sold the tickets. Elvis may not have been at the top of his game, and it's easy to see that now that we are able to hear it on bootlegs, but it was an unforgettable night. I've seen many better concerts since, including over 20 Springsteen shows, but Elvis just had some kind of charisma that I've never seen in anybody else, and I am so very glad I got to see him that night. So Mrs. Albers, thanks again for camping out in that parking lot.

Garry


That's a great story.Thanks for sharing it.It's stating the obvious that Elvis' live shows were certainly subpar during 77,especially compared to his own standards.Yet I think going to see an Elvis concert was so much more than the actual content of the performance.Regardless of his appearance or performance level.His shows were an event.It really did seem like you were going to see something special.Elvis just had some kind of magic about him,and it was still there right up until the last concert.He just had the ability to connect with the fans and inspire awe and devotion.I've been a fan for 35 years since I was 7 years old.I still have a hard time explaining why I still care about him so much or why I've spent so much time and money over the years on Elvis.For me he just had something radiate out from him that no other artist has ever come close to matching.Many other acts were in fact putting on much better shows in 77.You can even say they were giving their fans more bang for their buck when they bought their tickets.Yet,I would have bought a ticket to Elvis' show first every time.Even if all he did was walk across the stage for 30 seconds.Elvis seemed that important back then and still does to me.I think many fans feel like that.


Some very good points gang! Garry, thanks for sharing that wonderful story with us!

Re: Elvis Was Still #1 In 1977

Sun Jun 06, 2010 6:14 pm

Robert wrote:
imthcat wrote:
Juan Luis wrote:In small venues as well! Image


I'm confused (but that's not unusual). If 9,600 tickets were sold at $10 to $15 each, how could the gross be $264,000? It shouldn't be over $143,995. I suppose Billboard combined the revenue from both days in Chicago, without combining the number of tickets sold for both shows.


There's a typo in this article, attendance was 19600..

Cheers.
Thanks! Will have to edit the "small venue" part lol!

Re: Elvis Was Still #1 In 1977

Sun Jun 06, 2010 7:26 pm

Thanks, Garry, for sharing your story with us.

Re: Elvis Was Still #1 In 1977

Sun Jun 06, 2010 8:00 pm

3577 wrote:Midnightx is choosing Lynyrd Skynyrd and The Eagles above Elvis. (what else is new) That's no problem. But not realistic. Totally different music compared to Elvis. Elvis gave 1 hour concerts, other artists/bands, more, etc. Don't mix up your personal favourite with reality.

A concept you and many others should embrace. The reality is that there were other mainstream, highly popular acts producing better live shows than Elvis in 1977, regardless of the genre or approach to contemporary music. You and the blindly devoted shrug it off by simply asserting Elvis blew everyone away with his presence - which is a romantic defense considering there were plenty of patrons and reviewers leaving 1977 shows bewildered. It simply amazes me that a handful of members continue to gloss over posts so they can rush to judgment. Just because Elvis may be a personal favorite of mine, doesn't mean he was always the best. It is completely valid that I make the claim that I would have gone to see The Eagles or Skynyrd in '77 over Presley. I admire many musical artists, and for example, I would not have given up a chance to see Skynyrd's prime line-up with Steve Gaines prior to the October '77 plane crash. It would be a tough call, because even with Elvis in such a bad state, he was still Elvis -- yet, great musical execution trumps that notion and Skynryd, The Eagles, and ELP wins out from the initial list posted above.

Re: Elvis Was Still #1 In 1977

Sun Jun 06, 2010 8:30 pm

midnightx wrote:
3577 wrote:Midnightx is choosing Lynyrd Skynyrd and The Eagles above Elvis. (what else is new) That's no problem. But not realistic. Totally different music compared to Elvis. Elvis gave 1 hour concerts, other artists/bands, more, etc. Don't mix up your personal favourite with reality.

A concept you and many others should embrace. The reality is that there were other mainstream, highly popular acts producing better live shows than Elvis in 1977, regardless of the genre or approach to contemporary music. You and the blindly devoted shrug it off by simply asserting Elvis blew everyone away with his presence - which is a romantic defense considering there were plenty of patrons and reviewers leaving 1977 shows bewildered. It simply amazes me that a handful of members continue to gloss over posts so they can rush to judgment. Just because Elvis may be a personal favorite of mine, doesn't mean he was always the best. It is completely valid that I make the claim that I would have gone to see The Eagles or Skynyrd in '77 over Presley. I admire many musical artists, and for example, I would not have given up a chance to see Skynyrd's prime line-up with Steve Gaines prior to the October '77 plane crash. It would be a tough call, because even with Elvis in such a bad state, he was still Elvis -- yet, great musical execution trumps that notion and Skynryd, The Eagles, and ELP wins out from the initial list posted above.


O come on, I'm sure you'd prefer Jackie Kahane, JD's B-52 act, O sole mio, Walk with me & Danny boy in Largo'77 over The Eagles or Skynyrd?
Even Vernon talked about Led Zipper instead of Zeppelin, and he was on top of modern music!
It would have cost you a mere $15.

Re: Elvis Was Still #1 In 1977

Sun Jun 06, 2010 9:28 pm

midnightx wrote:
3577 wrote:Midnightx is choosing Lynyrd Skynyrd and The Eagles above Elvis. (what else is new) That's no problem. But not realistic. Totally different music compared to Elvis. Elvis gave 1 hour concerts, other artists/bands, more, etc. Don't mix up your personal favourite with reality.

A concept you and many others should embrace. The reality is that there were other mainstream, highly popular acts producing better live shows than Elvis in 1977, regardless of the genre or approach to contemporary music. You and the blindly devoted shrug it off by simply asserting Elvis blew everyone away with his presence - which is a romantic defense considering there were plenty of patrons and reviewers leaving 1977 shows bewildered. It simply amazes me that a handful of members continue to gloss over posts so they can rush to judgment. Just because Elvis may be a personal favorite of mine, doesn't mean he was always the best. It is completely valid that I make the claim that I would have gone to see The Eagles or Skynyrd in '77 over Presley. I admire many musical artists, and for example, I would not have given up a chance to see Skynyrd's prime line-up with Steve Gaines prior to the October '77 plane crash. It would be a tough call, because even with Elvis in such a bad state, he was still Elvis -- yet, great musical execution trumps that notion and Skynryd, The Eagles, and ELP wins out from the initial list posted above.


If I have to hear "Welcome to thee hotel california" one more time I will gouge out my ear drums.

Re: Elvis Was Still #1 In 1977

Sun Jun 06, 2010 9:32 pm

ekenee wrote:
midnightx wrote:
3577 wrote:Midnightx is choosing Lynyrd Skynyrd and The Eagles above Elvis. (what else is new) That's no problem. But not realistic. Totally different music compared to Elvis. Elvis gave 1 hour concerts, other artists/bands, more, etc. Don't mix up your personal favourite with reality.

A concept you and many others should embrace. The reality is that there were other mainstream, highly popular acts producing better live shows than Elvis in 1977, regardless of the genre or approach to contemporary music. You and the blindly devoted shrug it off by simply asserting Elvis blew everyone away with his presence - which is a romantic defense considering there were plenty of patrons and reviewers leaving 1977 shows bewildered. It simply amazes me that a handful of members continue to gloss over posts so they can rush to judgment. Just because Elvis may be a personal favorite of mine, doesn't mean he was always the best. It is completely valid that I make the claim that I would have gone to see The Eagles or Skynyrd in '77 over Presley. I admire many musical artists, and for example, I would not have given up a chance to see Skynyrd's prime line-up with Steve Gaines prior to the October '77 plane crash. It would be a tough call, because even with Elvis in such a bad state, he was still Elvis -- yet, great musical execution trumps that notion and Skynryd, The Eagles, and ELP wins out from the initial list posted above.


If I have to hear "Welcome to thee hotel california" one more time I will gouge out my ear drums.

I feel that way about amen/dive-bombs, the supersonic butchering of 50's classics, and If You Love Me (Let Me Know).

Re: Elvis Was Still #1 In 1977

Sun Jun 06, 2010 9:35 pm

midnightx wrote:
ekenee wrote:
midnightx wrote:
3577 wrote:Midnightx is choosing Lynyrd Skynyrd and The Eagles above Elvis. (what else is new) That's no problem. But not realistic. Totally different music compared to Elvis. Elvis gave 1 hour concerts, other artists/bands, more, etc. Don't mix up your personal favourite with reality.

A concept you and many others should embrace. The reality is that there were other mainstream, highly popular acts producing better live shows than Elvis in 1977, regardless of the genre or approach to contemporary music. You and the blindly devoted shrug it off by simply asserting Elvis blew everyone away with his presence - which is a romantic defense considering there were plenty of patrons and reviewers leaving 1977 shows bewildered. It simply amazes me that a handful of members continue to gloss over posts so they can rush to judgment. Just because Elvis may be a personal favorite of mine, doesn't mean he was always the best. It is completely valid that I make the claim that I would have gone to see The Eagles or Skynyrd in '77 over Presley. I admire many musical artists, and for example, I would not have given up a chance to see Skynyrd's prime line-up with Steve Gaines prior to the October '77 plane crash. It would be a tough call, because even with Elvis in such a bad state, he was still Elvis -- yet, great musical execution trumps that notion and Skynryd, The Eagles, and ELP wins out from the initial list posted above.


If I have to hear "Welcome to thee hotel california" one more time I will gouge out my ear drums.

I feel that way about amen/dive-bombs, the supersonic butchering of 50's classics, and If You Love Me (Let Me Know).


Good, so you understand my pain.

Re: Elvis Was Still #1 In 1977

Sun Jun 06, 2010 10:16 pm

ekenee wrote:
midnightx wrote:
londonflash wrote:
midnightx wrote:
Simon1 wrote:
midnightx wrote:
ekenee wrote:
midnightx wrote:
intheghetto wrote:Wow look at all the other acts on there! Alot of stuff I grew up with. It's amazing to see Elvis beating out all of the contemporary acts of that time.

Yes, and so many of them were putting on superior shows at that point in time.


And yet, I would still prefer to be at an Elvis show.

In fact, I would pay $10 just to hear Elvis sing "unchainged Melody" at the piano, than to hear a whole show by
any of those other 70's acts.

Suit yourself. Even while Elvis is generally number one for me, in 1977, from the artists on that particular list the Doc posted, I would have chosen to see The Eagles, ELP, and Lynyrd Skynyrd over the King.


Then why don't you go pester the fans on The Eagles, ELP and Lynyrd Skynyrd messageboards? If they'd performed a joint concert on the corner of my street I wouldn't have bothered to open the curtains, It just goes to show you don't 'feel' the importance of Elvis Presley. Even in 1977 he generated excitement in the crowds, it's obvious you have no clue as to what Elvis really meant to people. Have a nice day listening to Lynyrd Skynyrd.

What does understanding what Elvis meant to people have to do with the fact that the 3 acts I referenced from the list were producing superior live events? While Elvis' band was sleepwalking through another set, Skynyrd was dazzling audiences with its live prowess – sorry but I’ll take Allen Collins, Gary Rossington & Steve Gaines over Burton & Wilkinson circa ’77 and I would have taken Billy Powell over Tony Brown any day of the week. By 1977, ELP was one of the most virtuoso musical line-ups in contemporary music and they were flooring audiences during that period with their stimulating live shows - that would have been a great era to catch that band. And of course, The Eagles were playing stadiums while Elvis was playing arenas in Lincoln Nebraska. I’ll take The Eagles in 1977, hitting all of their vocal cues and notes while Elvis lumbers around the stage handing out scarves during Love Me. We are all Elvis homers on some level – but some of us love not only Elvis, but other acts as well. Elvis was clearly still a box office draw in 1977, but other acts from the period were blowing him off the stage. Take off the rose-colored glasses fellas – there was some great music during that period.


Totally understandable. Good, balanced post.

Why all the bashing, chaps? Elvis in 1977 wasn't putting on a good show, the other bands mentioned were. Had I been around at the time and been given a choice between the Eagles or Elvis, then I'd have seen the former every time.

If I had a time machine here, though, the answer would be different.

Agreed. If it were 1969 -- I'd have picked Elvis over Zeppelin, The Stones, The Dead, The Allman Brothers, Hendrix, The Doors, The Byrds, The Who, The Jeff Beck Group, Peter Green's Fleetwood Mac, etc. And lets face it, many of those bands were playing at their highest level -- but, Elvis was out of this world. It is all about perspective. Elvis in '77 was not delivering the goods -- and while some here would prefer sitting through an entire hour just to hear him tackle Unchained Melody (and I can respect that position), I would have rather seen The Eagles nail it with almost precise perfection for up to two hours. I want to see the best show. I love Elvis, but it he isn't delivering the goods, his charisma and sparkling jumpsuit isn't going to be more enticing than seeing another fantastic music act in its prime.


I think the thing that you don't get, is that some of us do not like the Eagles even in thier prime.

Not one of their songs do a think for me.

Isn't this - our respective preference for this or that artist other than Elvis - beside the point here?

I for one thought the point is/was: Would one rather see another performer/group than Elvis by 1977/his final phase due to the comparable quality of the shows, considering he still was a top box office act?
(For me, that is a purely hypotethical question, but still somewhat interesting.)

Whether that other act would be Lynard Skynard, Eagles, Waylon Jennings, whoever - are there much point in embarking on discussing such preferences?
Last edited by kajsa89 on Sun Jun 06, 2010 10:32 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Re: Elvis Was Still #1 In 1977

Sun Jun 06, 2010 10:29 pm

imthcat wrote:
When Elvis first South Carolina show in 20 years went on sale in early 1977, (...), but it was an unforgettable night. I've seen many better concerts since, including over 20 Springsteen shows, but Elvis just had some kind of charisma that I've never seen in anybody else, and I am so very glad I got to see him that night.
Garry

Garry, I am THRILLED you did get to see him!!

Did you make it to a show on Bruce's Darkness tour, btw? Perhaps a PM would be best, - even if it could be nice to balance all the L.Skynard/Eages talk with some Boss talk... :D

Re: Elvis Was Still #1 In 1977

Sun Jun 06, 2010 11:13 pm

midnightx wrote:
3577 wrote:Midnightx is choosing Lynyrd Skynyrd and The Eagles above Elvis. (what else is new) That's no problem. But not realistic. Totally different music compared to Elvis. Elvis gave 1 hour concerts, other artists/bands, more, etc. Don't mix up your personal favourite with reality.

A concept you and many others should embrace. The reality is that there were other mainstream, highly popular acts producing better live shows than Elvis in 1977, regardless of the genre or approach to contemporary music. You and the blindly devoted shrug it off by simply asserting Elvis blew everyone away with his presence - which is a romantic defense considering there were plenty of patrons and reviewers leaving 1977 shows bewildered. It simply amazes me that a handful of members continue to gloss over posts so they can rush to judgment. Just because Elvis may be a personal favorite of mine, doesn't mean he was always the best. It is completely valid that I make the claim that I would have gone to see The Eagles or Skynyrd in '77 over Presley. I admire many musical artists, and for example, I would not have given up a chance to see Skynyrd's prime line-up with Steve Gaines prior to the October '77 plane crash. It would be a tough call, because even with Elvis in such a bad state, he was still Elvis -- yet, great musical execution trumps that notion and Skynryd, The Eagles, and ELP wins out from the initial list posted above.


Hopeless. Again you come up with your personal choice. Not important. It's about the majority which choose/would have chosen to attend a Elvis concert.

We all know after 1973 Elvis isn't that important for you. My Boy, If You Love Me Let Me Know, jumpsuits, etc.. (and how tiring) For others, to see a living legend perform in the flesh above your beloved (personal) Eagles or Lynyrd Skynyrd or whoever.

I never said anything who i would choose back then. No need. This is not about personal favourites.

It's a competition now?

Re: Elvis Was Still #1 In 1977

Sun Jun 06, 2010 11:20 pm

Most people who are not hardcore Elvis fans would choose to see another act who were at their peak in that era. And a lot of hardcore Elvis fans would find it too painful to witness their hero at such a low ebb. Same with 90 percent of the 1976 shows.

Re: Elvis Was Still #1 In 1977

Mon Jun 07, 2010 12:03 am

3577 wrote:Hopeless. Again you come up with your personal choice. Not important. It's about the majority which choose/would have chosen to attend a Elvis concert.

We all know after 1973 Elvis isn't that important for you. My Boy, If You Love Me Let Me Know, jumpsuits, etc.. (and how tiring) For others, to see a living legend perform in the flesh above your beloved (personal) Eagles or Lynyrd Skynyrd or whoever.

I never said anything who i would choose back then. No need. This is not about personal favourites.

Oh, but it is about personal choice. Your position is that "the majority" would personally choose to see Elvis in a substandard state over other premier acts arguably in their prime. That is a personal choice -- and also a misguided opinion.

Read Frankie's post, it sums things up nicely.

Re: Elvis Was Still #1 In 1977

Mon Jun 07, 2010 1:06 am

midnightx wrote:
3577 wrote:Hopeless. Again you come up with your personal choice. Not important. It's about the majority which choose/would have chosen to attend a Elvis concert.

We all know after 1973 Elvis isn't that important for you. My Boy, If You Love Me Let Me Know, jumpsuits, etc.. (and how tiring) For others, to see a living legend perform in the flesh above your beloved (personal) Eagles or Lynyrd Skynyrd or whoever.

I never said anything who i would choose back then. No need. This is not about personal favourites.

Oh, but it is about personal choice. Your position is that "the majority" would personally choose to see Elvis in a substandard state over other premier acts arguably in their prime. That is a personal choice -- and also a misguided opinion.

Read Frankie's post, it sums things up nicely.



In the ends who really cares?
I am sure their were many fans didn't go see Elvis in 1977 and went to the Eagles show, just as you state.

The thing is Elvis still brought them in. If he didn't that would be different.

Even on a bad night, Elvis had what Joe Esposito said and that, "even in the end, his incredible voice never failed him."

There was that legendary voice. Ok, he didn't move around like he used to.

In 1969 he wasn't doing 1957 moves either, so I guess 1969 sucks by that logic??

Even in the last 2 two pro-filmed things there was some good stuff.

You are never going to win, bringing up some tired old 70's acts and comparing them
to Elvis on an Elvis forum. You can still say rose colored glasses all you want but that is not what it is.

It is YOUR personal choices. I'd rather see the partridge family than the eagles.
You say they were awesome, but that is just your opinion.
I say they suck. My opinion.
We don't have to compare your choices to Elvis.
We can compare your choices to my choices and leave ELvis out of the mix.

Yours-----Eagles---Jeff Beck---Lynard Skinyard
Mine----Dolly Parton-----Olivia newtonjohn-----Johnny Cash.

Mine wins. Case closed.

Re: Elvis Was Still #1 In 1977

Mon Jun 07, 2010 1:23 am

ekenee wrote: Mine wins. Case closed.


In your opinion.

Re: Elvis Was Still #1 In 1977

Mon Jun 07, 2010 1:36 am

Definitely only a person opinion. For mine ONJ and Dolly would be the last choices among the six mentioned.
Still it is all down to personal taste. I'd go for Status Quo and White above any of the six under debate

Re: Elvis Was Still #1 In 1977

Mon Jun 07, 2010 1:58 am

All this talk about some Elvis fans in 1976/1977 choosing to go and see another act because Elvis wasn't at his best isn't really true. Let me tell you, in those years fans weren't talking about Elvis gaining weight and or delivering sub-standard shows, it's only now, over 30 years later when we have all the evidence on zillions of soundboards, photos and everything that we know that he wasn't his old self anymore.

You have to also remember that in those days things were a LOT slower, in fan mags like Strictly Elvis in 1976/1977 the majority of photos were of an Elvis from a couple of years back, Aloha photos were still sipping through 4 years later, there weren't almost any up to date photos. Fans didn't Know what state he was in. Not until 'Elvis What Happened' came out fans started to learn that Elvis hadn't always been the clean-cut all American boy, the image that the Colonel had always been very protective of.

Only the fans that were constantly following him saw all the differences that started happening, the majority of fans only saw him whenever he visited their home town or nearby. And then, when you were seated in row 10 or in most cases much much further back, you didn't see his expanded belly or bloated face.

unfortunately I was too young to see him live, I went to Graceland first at 18, in 1983 after saving, scraping and borrowing, missed him by a mere 6 years, but I would have given eye teeth to have seen him just Once! The idea of rather going to see a concert by The Eagles or whomever for that matter just baffles me.

Going to see Elvis in 1977 wasn't like going to just another music act, Elvis by then, had transcended that, people were mesmerized just to be in the same room with him. His charisma was overwhelming and when they heard the first strains of Also Sprach Zarathustra, they were in another world. Even the great Ger Rijff, who by all accounts isn't your typical Seventies fan was Blown away when he saw him in Vegas '76 and then later in Cincinnati and Indianapolis. I remember him telling me that when he saw Elvis come onto that stage in '77 Ger was just flabbergasted by his charisma. (I have copies of his 8mm films he shot and I know exactly what moment he was referring to).

Elvis wasn't a star that was judged by his latest performance, he'd transcended that, he was like going to see Mount Rushmore some fans said. He was the ultimate American idol and, good or bad, he wasn't just judged by his latest performance like I said.

There was like a tradition with Elvis on stage, singing, handing out scarves and well just being Elvis, people didn't expect anymore by that time, the question whether it would have been better for both Elvis and his fans if it would have been better if they'd been more critical is for another discussion.

I personally have nothing against people who say they'd rather would have gone to an Eagles concert than to an Elvis concert, hey, tastes differ, it's just that I wouldn't call those people hard core Elvis fans, as I'm sure a hard-core Elvis fan would rather have gone see an Elvis show even if Elvis would have been carted onto the stage in a wheelchair.

All the same, it's great to me that we are all still discussing the legacy of (in my view) the greatest performer that ever lived. And thank god we can all differ from opinion, that's called freedom.

Cheers,
Simon

Re: Elvis Was Still #1 In 1977

Mon Jun 07, 2010 2:21 am

Frankie Teardrop wrote:
ekenee wrote: Mine wins. Case closed.


In your opinion.

Yes, I was being fascicous. (spelling)