Re: ELVIS GOES GLOBAL -> Critic Dave Marsh on "Aloha"

Thu Oct 30, 2008 12:14 am

Well i cant get enough of the Aloha and rehearsal.

Both incredible shows!!

Re: ELVIS GOES GLOBAL -> Critic Dave Marsh on "Aloha"

Thu Oct 30, 2008 1:31 am

In watching the footage of the 'insert songs' you can tell that Elvis is in a seemingly horrible mood and it's almost like he's saying, "Can we get this **** over with, already?"

Re: ELVIS GOES GLOBAL -> Critic Dave Marsh on "Aloha"

Thu Oct 30, 2008 1:33 am

Yes, but even still Elvis was showing signs of not putting his total commitment into it.
I mean look at the time he took into the recording sessions and taped production numbers for the 68 special.

For the 1973 special of a world wide show, he should have given a bit more.

It should have been something like this.

Day 1----rehearsal for insert songs---record insert songs
Day 2----rehearsals and full dress rehearsal of the live concert.
Day 3----the first show with audience
Day 4----the actual concert special

Is that too much to ask of an artist doing a special of this magnatude?

Of course then 1977 rolls around and he prepares nothing.

Re: ELVIS GOES GLOBAL -> Critic Dave Marsh on "Aloha"

Thu Oct 30, 2008 1:37 am

ekenee wrote:Yes, but even still Elvis was showing signs of not putting his total commitment into it.
I mean look at the time he took into the recording sessions and taped production numbers for the 68 special.

For the 1973 special of a world wide show, he should have given a bit more.

It should have been something like this.

Day 1----rehearsal for insert songs---record insert songs
Day 2----rehearsals and full dress rehearsal of the live concert.
Day 3----the first show with audience
Day 4----the actual concert special

Is that too much to ask of an artist doing a special of this magnatude?


Not really.

In truth, Elvis was a lazy, drug-addled, fat f*ck.

And he didn't contribute a thing of value to pop culture past adolescence.

That's about right, isn't it?

Re: ELVIS GOES GLOBAL -> Critic Dave Marsh on "Aloha"

Thu Oct 30, 2008 1:40 am

Cryogenic wrote:In truth, Elvis was a lazy, drug-addled, fat f*ck.

And he didn't contribute a thing of value to pop culture past adolescence.

That's about right, isn't it?

You may be going just an iota overboard with these thoughts.

Re: ELVIS GOES GLOBAL -> Critic Dave Marsh on "Aloha"

Thu Oct 30, 2008 1:45 am

carolynlm wrote:Can someone tell me please, what was the reasoning behind the 3 months delay in showing this in the US.

$$$

Re: ELVIS GOES GLOBAL -> Critic Dave Marsh on "Aloha"

Thu Oct 30, 2008 1:50 am

Cryogenic wrote:
ekenee wrote:Yes, but even still Elvis was showing signs of not putting his total commitment into it.
I mean look at the time he took into the recording sessions and taped production numbers for the 68 special.

For the 1973 special of a world wide show, he should have given a bit more.

It should have been something like this.

Day 1----rehearsal for insert songs---record insert songs
Day 2----rehearsals and full dress rehearsal of the live concert.
Day 3----the first show with audience
Day 4----the actual concert special

Is that too much to ask of an artist doing a special of this magnatude?


Not really.

In truth, Elvis was a lazy, drug-addled, fat f*ck.

And he didn't contribute a thing of value to pop culture past adolescence.

That's about right, isn't it?


I hope your comments were not in response to my comments because I don't see the analogy at all.

My point was he put in the bare minimum that was required of him.

He could have done more preperation and really only a day or 2 more would have helped.

But still Elvis had such an enormous talent that he didn't require alot of prep work to entertain the masses.

He just sold himself short though by not maximizing his talent to its full potential.

There are still so many shows in the year previous that were superior to the aloha show.

That should not be the case.

Re: ELVIS GOES GLOBAL -> Critic Dave Marsh on "Aloha"

Thu Oct 30, 2008 1:59 am

No wonder Elvis was pissed off for the additional songs.It must have been at least 2am when they
started.He would have come off stage happy and relieved that it went well with no real noticable
mistakes,especially lyric errors(slight mumble on burning love but no biggie)so he would have
been on a high.To then return to an empty arena to do these songs must have been the last thing
he needed.Terrible planning but as so often is the case why did Elvis not speak up against it before
hand as he knew he was going to do it.Why even do it in the first place.Surely an hour for American
TV was enough.

norrie

Re: ELVIS GOES GLOBAL -> Critic Dave Marsh on "Aloha"

Thu Oct 30, 2008 2:51 am

drjohncarpenter wrote:
Cryogenic wrote:In truth, Elvis was a lazy, drug-addled, fat f*ck.

And he didn't contribute a thing of value to pop culture past adolescence.

That's about right, isn't it?

You may be going just an iota overboard with these thoughts.


:shock:

ekenee wrote:I hope your comments were not in response to my comments because I don't see the analogy at all.


Not specifically, ekenee. They were more a general comment on the negativity here, of late.

My point was he put in the bare minimum that was required of him.


Agreed.

He could have done more preperation and really only a day or 2 more would have helped.


Agreed.

But still Elvis had such an enormous talent that he didn't require alot of prep work to entertain the masses.


Agreed.

He just sold himself short though by not maximizing his talent to its full potential.


Agreed.

The incredible thing about him is that he extended himself so little, yet achieved so much.

And, like anyone, he would have given more if he would have given more (if you see what I mean). The three TV specials all have the distinction of featuring two shows:

"Comeback" Elvis = 6PM and 8PM sitdown shows

"Aloha" Elvis = Jan 12th and Jan 14th stage shows

"EIC" Elvis = Omaha and Rapid City

In each, he showed a marked improvement in the second of the two sets of performances. And he really ruled the roost in 1968, when he did the most rehearsing and preparing.

If The Colonel's philosophy was "always leave them wanting more", then Elvis always left himself with talent to spare.

drjohncarpenter wrote:
carolynlm wrote:Can someone tell me please, what was the reasoning behind the 3 months delay in showing this in the US.

$$$


carolynlm wrote:Really? In what way.....


In the Colonel Parker way.

He wanted "Elvis On Tour" to have its innings at movie theatres first.

Re: ELVIS GOES GLOBAL -> Critic Dave Marsh on "Aloha"

Thu Oct 30, 2008 3:53 am

carolynlm wrote:Thanks for that Cryo.....it makes sense now..not sense in the normal way, just if tom parker had his hand in it then that is the 'sense' I mean...it's something I have often wondered about.....


It's my understanding that he did.

In any case, I don't think I blame him, here.

If you've got a product out that you want people to consume, you don't give them a free sample which is basically the entire thing, in a slightly different form. In general, you want to tease them and pique their curiosity, without revealing everything.

Gee, I never realised business could be so, so ... sexy. Seriously, I think Parker's reasoning was sound on this one. The Aloha concert was the free sample for a real concert -- the one thing it could actually serve as enticement for. In other words: "if you like what you saw, go and buy the album, then book tickets and treat yourself to the full experience."

Re: ELVIS GOES GLOBAL -> Critic Dave Marsh on "Aloha"

Thu Oct 30, 2008 4:40 am

Cryogenic wrote:
drjohncarpenter wrote:
Cryogenic wrote:In truth, Elvis was a lazy, drug-addled, fat f*ck.

And he didn't contribute a thing of value to pop culture past adolescence.

That's about right, isn't it?

You may be going just an iota overboard with these thoughts.


:shock:

ekenee wrote:I hope your comments were not in response to my comments because I don't see the analogy at all.


Not specifically, ekenee. They were more a general comment on the negativity here, of late.

My point was he put in the bare minimum that was required of him.


Agreed.

He could have done more preperation and really only a day or 2 more would have helped.


Agreed.

But still Elvis had such an enormous talent that he didn't require alot of prep work to entertain the masses.


Agreed.

He just sold himself short though by not maximizing his talent to its full potential.


Agreed.

The incredible thing about him is that he extended himself so little, yet achieved so much.

And, like anyone, he would have given more if he would have given more (if you see what I mean). The three TV specials all have the distinction of featuring two shows:

"Comeback" Elvis = 6PM and 8PM sitdown shows

"Aloha" Elvis = Jan 12th and Jan 14th stage shows

"EIC" Elvis = Omaha and Rapid City

In each, he showed a marked improvement in the second of the two sets of performances. And he really ruled the roost in 1968, when he did the most rehearsing and preparing.

If The Colonel's philosophy was "always leave them wanting more", then Elvis always left himself with talent to spare.

drjohncarpenter wrote:
carolynlm wrote:Can someone tell me please, what was the reasoning behind the 3 months delay in showing this in the US.

$$$


carolynlm wrote:Really? In what way.....


In the Colonel Parker way.

He wanted "Elvis On Tour" to have its innings at movie theatres first.


Cryo, so I take it by your post you don't consider the "stand-up" shows as a show?
I think its a show, but a mini show.
But even the sit-down shows were not really long and they were mainly acoustic, so a show with an orchestra could be considered more of a show than not in some people's minds. Not a big deal though.

But, I think you also saw my point in that each special he put less and less prep work into them.

Crap, in 1977 if he had just sat at a piano all by himself and sang 15 songs, that would have been a real winner.
Of course, a poolside interview never hurt a tv special either in my opinion.

Re: ELVIS GOES GLOBAL -> Critic Dave Marsh on "Aloha"

Thu Oct 30, 2008 5:13 am

ekenee wrote:Cryo, so I take it by your post you don't consider the "stand-up" shows as a show?
I think its a show, but a mini show.
But even the sit-down shows were not really long and they were mainly acoustic, so a show with an orchestra could be considered more of a show than not in some people's minds. Not a big deal though.


No, it isn't.

You're arguing semantics. The historical record proves that the sitdown shows are the core of the special.

ekenee wrote:Crap, in 1977 if he had just sat at a piano all by himself and sang 15 songs, that would have been a real winner.


Yep -- and it would have set that special apart from the others. In some senses, it would have been a return to a rootsier style, like the sitdown . . . wait for it . . . shows.

It may be that Elvis was hinting to that end during the making of his 1968 special, actually. Musical arranger and director Billy Goldenberg experienced him playing material on the piano, including "Moonlight Sonata". Sadly, Binder didn't act on this -- though, in the end, it hardly mattered.

Some of Elvis' best work is him at a piano. From the later concerts, we know about "You'll Never Walk Alone" and the similarly-titled "Where No One Stands Alone", as well as "Rags To Riches" and his numerous attempts at "Unchained Melody" -- all astonishing, unearthly performances. From the home recordings, we also know about things like "If I Loved You", which is so agonisingly raw that it's difficult to contemplate Elvis never attempting on stage or in a studio.

Really, at the piano, Elvis surpassed his own genius. He may have been locked into some brilliant rhythms on guitar, but he was able to bring an even more desperate approach to the vast percussive instrument, which seemed to ground him and allow him to draw even deeper from the well of his own talent.

Re: ELVIS GOES GLOBAL -> Critic Dave Marsh on "Aloha"

Thu Oct 30, 2008 8:48 am

I was kind of being flip when I suggested that Elvis do a TV show entirely from a piano.
Of course we all would have loved it.

But speaking more realisticly, he really should have done an album with just him and piano.

Judging by the 1971 recordings along with the studio version of "you'll never walk alone" and the home recordings, a piano and Elvis album would have been a fan favorite.

Re: ELVIS GOES GLOBAL -> Critic Dave Marsh on "Aloha"

Thu Oct 30, 2008 8:53 am

so another topic turns into a discussion on drugs.
Thanks Doc for posting the liner notes which are indeed interesting.
Elvis seems tired and rather lacklustre in the show which is why i prefer it less to other performances, but he still sings in a consumate manner and i see no sign of incapacity caused by drugs

Re: ELVIS GOES GLOBAL -> Critic Dave Marsh on "Aloha"

Thu Oct 30, 2008 10:35 am

Cryogenic wrote:
ekenee wrote:Yes, but even still Elvis was showing signs of not putting his total commitment into it.
I mean look at the time he took into the recording sessions and taped production numbers for the 68 special.

For the 1973 special of a world wide show, he should have given a bit more.

It should have been something like this.

Day 1----rehearsal for insert songs---record insert songs
Day 2----rehearsals and full dress rehearsal of the live concert.
Day 3----the first show with audience
Day 4----the actual concert special

Is that too much to ask of an artist doing a special of this magnatude?


Not really.

In truth, Elvis was a lazy, drug-addled, fat f*ck.

And he didn't contribute a thing of value to pop culture past adolescence.

That's about right, isn't it?


I reckon you're a fat ****** up arrogant North American **** who was a bit pissed when you typed this. And I know this just about as much as what your opinion is based on. Dumb comment, just dumb.

Re: ELVIS GOES GLOBAL -> Critic Dave Marsh on "Aloha"

Thu Oct 30, 2008 10:40 am

Cryogenic wrote:Yep -- and it would have set that special apart from the others. In some senses, it would have been a return to a rootsier style, like the sitdown . . . wait for it . . . shows.

It may be that Elvis was hinting to that end during the making of his 1968 special, actually. Musical arranger and director Billy Goldenberg experienced him playing material on the piano, including "Moonlight Sonata". Sadly, Binder didn't act on this -- though, in the end, it hardly mattered.

Some of Elvis' best work is him at a piano. From the later concerts, we know about "You'll Never Walk Alone" and the similarly-titled "Where No One Stands Alone", as well as "Rags To Riches" and his numerous attempts at "Unchained Melody" -- all astonishing, unearthly performances. From the home recordings, we also know about things like "If I Loved You", which is so agonisingly raw that it's difficult to contemplate Elvis never attempting on stage or in a studio.

Really, at the piano, Elvis surpassed his own genius. He may have been locked into some brilliant rhythms on guitar, but he was able to bring an even more desperate approach to the vast percussive instrument, which seemed to ground him and allow him to draw even deeper from the well of his own talent.

Excellent observations, Cryo. The well known Rapid City version of "Unchained Melody" finds Elvis lost in a moment, a very raw moment. I don't know anyone to whom I have shown this footage to be unaffected <insert smartarse comment here>. How this was left out of the finished special is astounding. And what I would give for the visuals of "Where No One Stands Alone".........

Re: ELVIS GOES GLOBAL -> Critic Dave Marsh on "Aloha"

Thu Oct 30, 2008 11:16 am

Jim Dandy wrote:
Cryogenic wrote:
ekenee wrote:Yes, but even still Elvis was showing signs of not putting his total commitment into it.
I mean look at the time he took into the recording sessions and taped production numbers for the 68 special.

For the 1973 special of a world wide show, he should have given a bit more.

It should have been something like this.

Day 1----rehearsal for insert songs---record insert songs
Day 2----rehearsals and full dress rehearsal of the live concert.
Day 3----the first show with audience
Day 4----the actual concert special

Is that too much to ask of an artist doing a special of this magnatude?


Not really.

In truth, Elvis was a lazy, drug-addled, fat f*ck.

And he didn't contribute a thing of value to pop culture past adolescence.

That's about right, isn't it?


I reckon you're a fat ****** up arrogant North American **** who was a bit pissed when you typed this. And I know this just about as much as what your opinion is based on. Dumb comment, just dumb.

JD, I think Cyogenic was taking a not to subtle wipe at a few well known posters who take every and any opportunity to debase the artistic merits of anything Elvis did that has not been (A) a commercial success or (B) endorsed by a well known writer/critic.

Re: ELVIS GOES GLOBAL -> Critic Dave Marsh on "Aloha"

Thu Oct 30, 2008 11:22 am

carolynlm wrote:Can someone tell me please, what was the reasoning behind the 3 months delay in showing this in the US.


Time differences meant it couldn't be beamed 'live' to everywhere.

For those countries who didn't get it live [US, UK etc.] there wasn't any reason to broadcast it immediately, and they simply fitted it into their schedules later.

In the UK, we waited ages.........................

Re: ELVIS GOES GLOBAL -> Critic Dave Marsh on "Aloha"

Thu Oct 30, 2008 5:02 pm

ekenee wrote:Yes, but even still Elvis was showing signs of not putting his total commitment into it.
I mean look at the time he took into the recording sessions and taped production numbers for the 68 special.

For the 1973 special of a world wide show, he should have given a bit more.

It should have been something like this.

Day 1----rehearsal for insert songs---record insert songs
Day 2----rehearsals and full dress rehearsal of the live concert.
Day 3----the first show with audience
Day 4----the actual concert special

Is that too much to ask of an artist doing a special of this magnatude?

Of course then 1977 rolls around and he prepares nothing.


I never understood the reasoning of taping the bonus songs after the main concert. Surely they must've realised that Elvis would be tired after the concert. There must have been some reason for doing it at that time and I doubt Elvis was the one to blame.

Secondly, Elvis worked for the show. The first Aloha show was in fact a full dress rehearsal and he did rehearse with the band before. There's even a photo of the stage rehearsal

http://www.elvis-collectors.com/candid- ... tunzi.html

Also, he held rehearsals at his hotel if I remember correctly. Anyone got more info about that?
Last edited by Marko on Thu Oct 30, 2008 11:40 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Re: ELVIS GOES GLOBAL -> Critic Dave Marsh on "Aloha"

Thu Oct 30, 2008 8:02 pm

ekenee wrote:
(Dave Marsh's) reviews are worth-less, let alone worth a second look. I saw Dave Marsh on a tv show one time spouting out his "reviews" and I lost respect for him then, and after reading this, I see nothing to change my mind. His observations are inaccurate and generalized with out pointing out anything worthwhile. Its all worthless. Not sure any of it is accurate other than the state he performed in.



Ekenee, just what are you smoking?

I don't find Marsh particularly charming in person (not unusual for a writer and a classic record store geek) and I don't share all of his politics (he's forever finding some kind of artistry and hope in rap music, for one), but he's one of the most noted rock critics for a reason -and one of the biggest pro-Elvis critics there is, right up there with Guralnick and Marcus, both also Rolling Stone veterans.

Have you even read his 1982 book on "Elvis" ? From your knee-jerk comments, it's quite obvious you're not even familiar with it, as you yourself purport to be an Elvis fan yet bash one of his most noted defenders.

It's one of the best essays in defense of Elvis to be found anywhere and I recall him having some choice words for Goldman and Parker as well.

Lots of us have our internal arguments about the merits of Elvis' music in the '70s ( I tend to side with Cryo on this subject -see below for an example) but whether you're Doc Carpenter, Midnight Oil or Rob or Little Darlin' or Plain Jane Elvis fan, anyone who "gets" Elvis like Dave Marsh deserves more than a little respect.

Marsh's anthology of his essays (as well as the first edition of ROLLING STONE) are also some of the most inspired and passionate music writing I've ever had to pleasure of reading.

To Doc and others, I enjoyed Marsh's ALOHA DVD notes when the came out because I was aware that he'd often been critical of '70s Elvis (and Cryo is right that it is evident) and yet he still manages to salute a great milestone in Elvis' career.





Cryogenic wrote:Here, Dave Marsh is too prosaic, for my tastes. When I want to read some good writing on Elvis' art and appeal, I want to read something that is suitably poetic and inflected with joy. Greil Marcus gives me that in the "Comeback Special" essay; Marsh failed in this one, in my opinion.

One of the problems seems to be that he's dancing around the point. I actually don't think he particularly likes the "Aloha" concert. Look at this paragraph, for an example:


What Elvis sang leaned heavily on the concert staples he’d been developing since returning to live performance in 1969: Big showbiz ballads like "What Now My Love" and "My Way," jived up old rock ’n’ roll hits like "Johnny B. Goode" and "Blue Suede Shoes," movie period production numbers like "Big Hunk O’ Love" and "Can’t Help Falling In Love." He did a few contemporary soft rock tunes, notably James Taylor’s lumbering "Steamroller Blues" and the Beatles’ "Something."


It's just a mundane list of songs with unimaginative descriptors: "jived up", "movie period", "contemporary", "lumbering". The middle two are bland, like Marsh is rattling off a corporate speech, while the surrounding two are contrite, almost damning the arrangements, if you really think about them.

Nowhere does Marsh talk about Elvis' vocal approaches or visual flourishes, except in sweeping, superficial, lip-service-like ways. For example, rather than call "Steamroller Blues" ... "lumbering" ... I'd have favoured Marsh commenting on how Elvis peformed it here compared to James Taylor, the originator. That would give you just the faintest insight into why Elvis matters.

Marsh really gives the game away by heaping added praise on the "rehearsal" concert, in no uncertain terms. Not only do I disagree with this viewpoint, but it's clear he finds more love for that than the main event, yet it was the main event he was required to focus on. That's the issue: Marcus has no passion for what he's been asked to write for, and without passion, a writer has less than nothing.

When one listens to or watches Elvis and finds enjoyment in doing so, one gets a magical feeling inside them. When I read this essay by Marsh, he does not put that hint of magic across....


Fair points, Cry. I count you as one of the best defenders of '70s Elvis precisely for your ability to not take the "rockist" (look it up, folks) approach of dismissing the "big ballads" of his late career such as "It's Over," etc.

This is one of the generational blind spots of a Dave Marsh ( a bit of an outsider in school) who grew up validated by the rise of rock (and cheering the demise of smooth balladry and adult "schmaltz") but he's still one of the best Elvis writers, let alone his greater reputation as a legendary rock critic.

(Yes, there is such a thing, apparently!) :D

Re: ELVIS GOES GLOBAL -> Critic Dave Marsh on "Aloha"

Thu Oct 30, 2008 8:21 pm

Gregory Nolan Jr. wrote:
ekenee wrote:
(Dave Marsh's) reviews are worth-less, let alone worth a second look. I saw Dave Marsh on a tv show one time spouting out his "reviews" and I lost respect for him then, and after reading this, I see nothing to change my mind. His observations are inaccurate and generalized with out pointing out anything worthwhile. Its all worthless. Not sure any of it is accurate other than the state he performed in.



Ekenee, just what are you smoking?

I don't find Marsh particularly charming in person (not unusual for a writer and a classic record store geek) and I don't share all of his politics (he's forever finding some kind of artistry and hope in rap music, for one), but he's one of the most noted rock critics for a reason -and one of the biggest pro-Elvis critics there is, right up there with Guralnick and Marcus, both also Rolling Stone veterans.

Have you even read his 1982 book on "Elvis" ? From your knee-jerk comments, it's quite obvious you're not even familiar with it, as you yourself purport to be an Elvis fan yet bash one of his most noted defenders.

It's one of the best essays in defense of Elvis to be found anywhere and I recall him having some choice words for Goldman and Parker as well.

Lots of us have our internal arguments about the merits of Elvis' music in the '70s ( I tend to side with Cryo on this subject -see below for an example) but whether you're Doc Carpenter, Midnight Oil or Rob or Little Darlin' or Plain Jane Elvis fan, anyone who "gets" Elvis like Dave Marsh deserves more than a little respect.

Marsh's anthology of his essays (as well as the first edition of ROLLING STONE) are also some of the most inspired and passionate music writing I've ever had to pleasure of reading.

To Doc and others, I enjoyed Marsh's ALOHA DVD notes when the came out because I was aware that he'd often been critical of '70s Elvis (and Cryo is right that it is evident) and yet he still manages to salute a great milestone in Elvis' career.





Cryogenic wrote:Here, Dave Marsh is too prosaic, for my tastes. When I want to read some good writing on Elvis' art and appeal, I want to read something that is suitably poetic and inflected with joy. Greil Marcus gives me that in the "Comeback Special" essay; Marsh failed in this one, in my opinion.

One of the problems seems to be that he's dancing around the point. I actually don't think he particularly likes the "Aloha" concert. Look at this paragraph, for an example:


What Elvis sang leaned heavily on the concert staples he’d been developing since returning to live performance in 1969: Big showbiz ballads like "What Now My Love" and "My Way," jived up old rock ’n’ roll hits like "Johnny B. Goode" and "Blue Suede Shoes," movie period production numbers like "Big Hunk O’ Love" and "Can’t Help Falling In Love." He did a few contemporary soft rock tunes, notably James Taylor’s lumbering "Steamroller Blues" and the Beatles’ "Something."


It's just a mundane list of songs with unimaginative descriptors: "jived up", "movie period", "contemporary", "lumbering". The middle two are bland, like Marsh is rattling off a corporate speech, while the surrounding two are contrite, almost damning the arrangements, if you really think about them.

Nowhere does Marsh talk about Elvis' vocal approaches or visual flourishes, except in sweeping, superficial, lip-service-like ways. For example, rather than call "Steamroller Blues" ... "lumbering" ... I'd have favoured Marsh commenting on how Elvis peformed it here compared to James Taylor, the originator. That would give you just the faintest insight into why Elvis matters.

Marsh really gives the game away by heaping added praise on the "rehearsal" concert, in no uncertain terms. Not only do I disagree with this viewpoint, but it's clear he finds more love for that than the main event, yet it was the main event he was required to focus on. That's the issue: Marcus has no passion for what he's been asked to write for, and without passion, a writer has less than nothing.

When one listens to or watches Elvis and finds enjoyment in doing so, one gets a magical feeling inside them. When I read this essay by Marsh, he does not put that hint of magic across....


Fair points, Cry. I count you as one of the best defenders of '70s Elvis precisely for your ability to not take the "rockist" (look it up, folks) approach of dismissing the "big ballads" of his late career such as "It's Over," etc.

This is one of the generational blind spots of a Dave Marsh ( a bit of an outsider in school) who grew up validated by the rise of rock (and cheering the demise of smooth balladry and adult "schmaltz") but he's still one of the best Elvis writers, let alone his greater reputation as a legendary rock critic.

(Yes, there is such a thing, apparently!) :D


Bottomline: I don't like everyone just because they like Elvis.

I don't care for the guy. I don't find his observations particularly interesting or thought provoking.
There are many writers I find interesting, but Marsh is not one of them.
I think I did read his book when it came out. I think I checked it out at our library.
To be honest I can't remember what I thought of it, but since it doesn't stand out in my memory, that says something.
He kind of reminds me of the way Bono goes on about Elvis. Mumbo jumbo. Alot of talk but not but substance.
In fact, Marsh went on tv one time and basically just started stating the obvious about ELvis. All cliche.
Sorry, but that is my observation. Maybe he made a bad first impression on me.

Re: ELVIS GOES GLOBAL -> Critic Dave Marsh on "Aloha"

Thu Oct 30, 2008 8:32 pm

Regarding the rehearsals for the Aloha show Day by Day book by Peter Guralnick and Ernst Jorgensen states that Elvis held rehearsals with the band and the backup singers at his hotel the same day he arrived to Hawaii on Tuesday January 9th. The next day there is rehearsal with the full orchestra and on Friday there's an extra reheasal at the ICC Arena. I think it's fair to say he did prepare himself for the show.
Last edited by Marko on Thu Oct 30, 2008 8:38 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Re: ELVIS GOES GLOBAL -> Critic Dave Marsh on "Aloha"

Thu Oct 30, 2008 8:36 pm

Marko wrote:Regarding the rehearsals for the Aloha show Day by Day book by Peter Guralnick and Ernst Jorgensen states that Elvis held rehearsals with the band and the backup singers at his hotel the same he arrived to Hawaii on Tuesday January 9th. The next day there is rehearsal with the full orchestra and on Friday there's an extra reheasal at the ICC Arena. I think it's fair to say he did prepare himself for the show.

Not sure who would argue otherwise. Clearly Elvis was prepared. Aloha was a very professional and successful performance by Elvis.

Re: ELVIS GOES GLOBAL -> Critic Dave Marsh on "Aloha"

Thu Oct 30, 2008 8:42 pm

midnightx wrote:
Marko wrote:Regarding the rehearsals for the Aloha show Day by Day book by Peter Guralnick and Ernst Jorgensen states that Elvis held rehearsals with the band and the backup singers at his hotel the same he arrived to Hawaii on Tuesday January 9th. The next day there is rehearsal with the full orchestra and on Friday there's an extra reheasal at the ICC Arena. I think it's fair to say he did prepare himself for the show.

Not sure who would argue otherwise. Clearly Elvis was prepared. Aloha was a very professional and successful performance by Elvis.


ekenee wrote:Yes, but even still Elvis was showing signs of not putting his total commitment into it.
I mean look at the time he took into the recording sessions and taped production numbers for the 68 special.

For the 1973 special of a world wide show, he should have given a bit more.



The '68 Comeback Special was very different from Aloha show. Comeback Special had complex production numbers and several diffrent live segments. Aloha was just a live tv concert.

Re: ELVIS GOES GLOBAL -> Critic Dave Marsh on "Aloha"

Thu Oct 30, 2008 8:56 pm

Marko wrote:
midnightx wrote:
Marko wrote:Regarding the rehearsals for the Aloha show Day by Day book by Peter Guralnick and Ernst Jorgensen states that Elvis held rehearsals with the band and the backup singers at his hotel the same he arrived to Hawaii on Tuesday January 9th. The next day there is rehearsal with the full orchestra and on Friday there's an extra reheasal at the ICC Arena. I think it's fair to say he did prepare himself for the show.

Not sure who would argue otherwise. Clearly Elvis was prepared. Aloha was a very professional and successful performance by Elvis.


ekenee wrote:Yes, but even still Elvis was showing signs of not putting his total commitment into it.
I mean look at the time he took into the recording sessions and taped production numbers for the 68 special.

For the 1973 special of a world wide show, he should have given a bit more.



The '68 Comeback Special was very different from Aloha show. Comeback Special had complex production numbers and several diffrent live segments. Aloha was just a live tv concert.

Yes it was. It was a LIVE international TV broadcast. Please explain how complex production numbers could have played a part on a live concert broadcast? And there is zero reason to compare the concept of a pre-recorded television special that had multiple segments and scenes to a live concert.

Elvis prepared himself physically and mentally for Aloha. He was more than committed. He rehearsed extensively and spent time considering various songs to include and not include in the set list. Clearly the toll of his overall health and drug issues hurt his ability to engage the show like he had done in the past, but he put on a very professional and engaging show.