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Grace Kelly stands up for black artists - 1956

Thu Jan 16, 2014 3:53 am

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Kelly - Armstrong 1.jpg


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Kelly - Armstrong 2.jpg


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Re: Grace Kelly stands up for black artists - 1956

Thu Jan 16, 2014 7:47 am

Yet another reason to adore Grace Kelly. Thank you for finding this.

Re: Grace Kelly stands up for black artists - 1956

Thu Jan 16, 2014 11:51 am

Thank you so much for this topic, Mister Moon. ::rocks

And boy, what a beauty she was. :smt007

Re: Grace Kelly stands up for black artists - 1956

Thu Jan 16, 2014 7:28 pm

Nice and intersting topic, thanks.

Re: Grace Kelly stands up for black artists - 1956

Thu Jan 16, 2014 11:13 pm

You're welcome, Doc, Lucky, and Mike.

I found the clipping and thought it was well worth a topic. Glad you enjoyed it too.

By the way, I love the scene in "High Society" where Bing Crosby and Grace sing "True Love". It's just beautiful. Many years ago, I purchased the soundtrack of that 1956 film just to own this song, which in addition is an "Elvis original", of course.

I know Elvis' version of "True Love" is not held in high regard, but I love it. I like the very intimate feel of Elvis singing along with The Jordanaires with a very sparse instrumentation. They must have enjoyed recording it. Maybe not a masterpiece, but a beautiful track.

Re: Grace Kelly stands up for black artists - 1956

Fri Jan 17, 2014 12:09 am

Grace Kelly was a class act and her comments in the article posted above are further testament to that. She was also a fine actress, who endeavoured greatly to help those less fortunate than her -- even when she left acting and married into royalty. She often held charity events for the Red Cross and the United Nations, doing so many times with her close friend, Frank Sinatra, whom she co-starred with in High Society. Which was her final movie, incidentally; and a bit of a gem. Her cool, aloof acting style fitting perfectly the role of Tracy Lord. Cole Porter's score was, if you'll pardon the pun, sensational, and True Love was one of many highlights. On a side note, it was at a benefit for the United Nations' Refugee Fund, on June 14th, 1958, that Quincy Jones got one of his first real breaks. He was working for the Nicole and Eddie Barclay recording company in Paris as a conductor/arranger when, at the request of Frank Sinatra, Princess Grace's office contacted him regarding his services for the show. And this was a truly incredible show!

Re: Grace Kelly stands up for black artists - 1956

Fri Jan 17, 2014 1:16 am

Mister Moon wrote:I know Elvis' version of "True Love" is not held in high regard, but I love it. I like the very intimate feel of Elvis singing along with The Jordanaires with a very sparse instrumentation. They must have enjoyed recording it. Maybe not a masterpiece, but a beautiful track.


Completely agree buddy, such a sweet vocal.

Re: Grace Kelly stands up for black artists - 1956

Fri Jan 17, 2014 1:43 am

If Elvis's recording of True Love isn't held in high regard, then it should certainly be held in higher regard -- it's a lovely version of a beautiful song. Here, Elvis sings the melody quite wonderfully, never feeling the need to lapse into some of the vocal mannerisms that were often present in his recordings at this time. He sings the opening line with a warm sincerity and is joined by the Jordanaires in an almost hymnal fashion. It's all very endearing, and I believe shades of Crosby to be abound here. But Elvis seems wholly at ease and is on the most charming of form throughout.

Re: Grace Kelly stands up for black artists - 1956

Fri Jan 17, 2014 2:01 am

greystoke wrote:Grace Kelly was a class act and her comments in the article posted above are further testament to that. She was also a fine actress, who endeavoured greatly to help those less fortunate than her -- even when she left acting and married into royalty. She often held charity events for the Red Cross and the United Nations, doing so many times with her close friend, Frank Sinatra, whom she co-starred with in High Society. Which was her final movie, incidentally; and a bit of a gem. Her cool, aloof acting style fitting perfectly the role of Tracy Lord. Cole Porter's score was, if you'll pardon the pun, sensational, and True Love was one of many highlights. On a side note, it was at a benefit for the United Nations' Refugee Fund, on June 14th, 1958, that Quincy Jones got one of his first real breaks. He was working for the Nicole and Eddie Barclay recording company in Paris as a conductor/arranger when, at the request of Frank Sinatra, Princess Grace's office contacted him regarding his services for the show. And this was a truly incredible show!


Thanks for your post, greystoke.

Grace was a classy, intelligent and educated woman, that's for sure. And I like Sinatra's answer when they asked him about her wedding, and retiring from acting : "Hollywood loses a great actress. Monaco wins a great princess".

Re: Grace Kelly stands up for black artists - 1956

Fri Jan 17, 2014 2:03 am

mike edwards66 wrote:
Mister Moon wrote:I know Elvis' version of "True Love" is not held in high regard, but I love it. I like the very intimate feel of Elvis singing along with The Jordanaires with a very sparse instrumentation. They must have enjoyed recording it. Maybe not a masterpiece, but a beautiful track.


Completely agree buddy, such a sweet vocal.


greystoke wrote:If Elvis's recording of True Love isn't held in high regard, then it should certainly be held in higher regard -- it's a lovely version of a beautiful song. Here, Elvis sings the melody quite wonderfully, never feeling the need to lapse into some of the vocal mannerisms that were often present in his recordings at this time. He sings the opening line with a warm sincerity and is joined by the Jordanaires in an almost hymnal fashion. It's all very endearing, and I believe shades of Crosby to be abound here. But Elvis seems wholly at ease and is on the most charming of form throughout.


I'm glad you also enjoy this recording. Thanks for your comments !

Re: Grace Kelly stands up for black artists - 1956

Fri Jan 17, 2014 3:49 am

Here's a couple of great photos taken during the trip mentioned in the clipping :

GK 1.jpg


GK 0.jpg


More here :

http://habituallychic.blogspot.com.es/2011/01/graceful-sailing.html

On April 4, 1956, Grace along with 50 members of her family, friends and bridesmaids, 84 pieces of luggage, and her poodle boarded the SS Constitution on route to France and her new life as a princess. She was seen off by thousands including hundreds of members of the press. The trip across the Atlantic took eight days and she passed the time playing charades, shuffleboard and walking her dogs on deck.
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Last edited by Mister Moon on Sat Jan 18, 2014 4:49 am, edited 2 times in total.

Re: Grace Kelly stands up for black artists - 1956

Fri Jan 17, 2014 12:03 pm

I have to admit I like Grace and Bing's version of "True Love" better than Elvis'.

Re: Grace Kelly stands up for black artists - 1956

Sat Jan 18, 2014 12:00 am

luckyjackson1 wrote:I have to admit I like Grace and Bing's version of "True Love" better than Elvis'.


Me, too. But I think Elvis's version is so very good and deserves to be better known. Its inclusion would be welcome on any number of compilations -- but we can say that of many Elvis recordings that reveal impressive and laudible facets of his artistry.

Re: Grace Kelly stands up for black artists - 1956

Sat Jan 18, 2014 4:26 am

Three more images from the same occasion :

GK 3.jpg


GK 5.jpg


GK 7.jpg
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Re: Grace Kelly stands up for black artists - 1956

Sat Jan 18, 2014 12:24 pm

Thank you, Mister Moon. I now wish to learn more about her than just the general outline.

Much appreciated!

rjm

Sent From My Phabulous Galaxy Note II Phablet Using Tapatalk 4

Re: Grace Kelly stands up for black artists - 1956

Sat Jan 18, 2014 1:31 pm

rjm wrote:Thank you, Mister Moon. I now wish to learn more about her than just the general outline.

Much appreciated!


You're welcome, rjm. Very glad you liked this !

Re: Grace Kelly stands up for black artists - 1956

Sat Jan 18, 2014 3:31 pm

I'm guessing you're a big fan of Grace Kelly, Mister Moon?

Re: Grace Kelly stands up for black artists - 1956

Sat Jan 18, 2014 7:05 pm

greystoke wrote:I'm guessing you're a big fan of Grace Kelly, Mister Moon?


Ha, ha. Not really.

But I've always liked her for different reasons. I like her looks, and I like her work, and some of the movies she appeared in. Those scissors !

She was special in many ways, that's true.

So it was nice to find that clipping, and this was also a good excuse to post some beautiful photos of her from that occasion.

Re: Grace Kelly stands up for black artists - 1956

Sat Jan 18, 2014 7:36 pm

Mister Moon wrote:
greystoke wrote:I'm guessing you're a big fan of Grace Kelly, Mister Moon?


Ha, ha. Not really.

But I've always liked her for different reasons. I like her looks, and I like her work, and some of the movies she appeared in. Those scissors !

She was special in many ways, that's true.

So it was nice to find that clipping, and this was also a good excuse to post some beautiful photos of her from that occasion.


Those reasons are as good as any.

Re: Grace Kelly stands up for black artists - 1956

Sun Jan 19, 2014 1:34 am

More stuff along the same lines. Kelly was also close friends with artist Josephine Baker, also known as a civil rights activist :

In 1951, the newly famous Grace Kelly took a bold stand against a racist incident involving Black American expatriate singer/dancer Josephine Baker, when Sherman Billingsley’s Stork Club in New York refused Baker as a customer. Kelly, who was dining at the club when this happened, was so disgusted that she rushed over to Baker (whom she had never met), took her by the arm, and stormed out with her entire party, vowing never to return (and she never did). The two women became close friends after that night. A significant testament to their close friendship was made evident when Baker was near bankruptcy, and was offered a villa and financial assistance by Kelly (who by that time had become The Princess of Monaco) and her husband Rainier III of Monaco. The princess also encouraged Baker to return to performing and financed Baker’s triumphant comeback in 1975, attending the opening night’s performance. When Baker died, the Princess secured her burial in Monaco.


Baker - Kelly.jpg


http://iheartgracekelly.tumblr.com/post/17017402979/in-1951-the-newly-famous-grace-kelly-took-a-bold
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Re: Grace Kelly stands up for black artists - 1956

Mon Jan 20, 2014 3:03 am

As a result of this thread I've been singing this song to myself for the past few days. I have to post these, to break the spell !

phpBB [video]



phpBB [video]

Re: Grace Kelly stands up for black artists - 1956

Mon Jan 20, 2014 7:42 pm

mike edwards66 wrote:As a result of this thread I've been singing this song to myself for the past few days. I have to post these, to break the spell !

phpBB [video]



phpBB [video]



Mike, you've read my mind ! I could sign your post.

I was thinking of doing the same thing. Thanks a lot ! :wink:

Re: Grace Kelly stands up for black artists - 1956

Thu Apr 10, 2014 2:43 am

I found a few nice images of Grace taken in Jamaica in 1955 by photographer Howell Conant.

They are a good excuse to bring this topic back to life.

Grace Kelly Jamaica 1955.jpg


Grace Kelly Jamaica 1955d.jpg


One of Conant's photos graced (!) the front cover of "Collier's" magazine that year.

Grace Kelly Collier's 550624.jpg


And here's an alternate for that photo.

Grace Kelly Jamaica 1955 x.jpg


Some information about the photographer :

Howell T. Conant, Senior (1916–1999) was an American fashion photographer noted for his portraits of the American actress and later Princess Consort of Monaco, Grace Kelly.

(...)

In 1955 Conant was commissioned by Photoplay magazine to do a cover shoot with Grace Kelly, then a leading film actress. Following the Photoplay shoot, Kelly holidayed in Jamaica, with her sister, and invited Conant. He photographed her without makeup in a naturalistic setting, a departure from the traditional portrayal of actresses. The resulting photographs were published in the June 24 issue of Collier's magazine, with a celebrated photo of Kelly rising from the water with wet hair making the cover.


And, as it turns out, some of the photos I posted earlier in this thread are also Conant images :

Kelly sailed on the SS Constitution from New York to Monaco for her marriage to Prince Rainier in 1956. Many photographers were on board the ship, but only Conant had access to Kelly. Following her marriage Conant was the unofficial photographer to the House of Grimaldi, and extensively photographed Kelly, her husband and their three children. In 1992 Conant published Grace, a book of photographs that he took during Kelly's 26 year reign as Princess of Monaco.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Howell_Conant

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I have taken some of these photos from the following website. More available there :

http://leileiclavey.com/2012/05/01/grace-kelly-style-icon/
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Re: Grace Kelly stands up for black artists - 1956

Fri Apr 11, 2014 2:17 pm

Thanks for posting, especially that one:
Grace%20Kelly%20Jamaica%201955.jpg
:smt007 :smt007 :smt007
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Re: Grace Kelly stands up for black artists - 1956

Fri Apr 11, 2014 10:14 pm

luckyjackson1 wrote:Thanks for posting, especially that one:
Grace%20Kelly%20Jamaica%201955.jpg
:smt007 :smt007 :smt007


Amazing Grace !