Here you can discuss other musicians and CD reissues etc

Masterpiece of Voice

Thu Dec 12, 2013 2:43 am

Quite often, whilst driving distances, I will put this 'masterpiece of voice' on the repeat loop. I find it focuses the mind and soothes the soul (although individual results and experiences may vary).

This ladies and gentlemen is Ivan Rebroff. Too much background information, I find, can dull what follows. Anyone who needs or wants to know more, merely has to google and all will be revealed.

Suffice to say, unique voice, four and a half octaves of pure clarity. His controlled falsetto is louder and stronger than traditional falsetto. His bass is rich, with fully rounded vowels, and could make the ground shake. He moves swiftly and smoothly from one octave to the next, his low notes are very low, his high notes are sustained without strain.

When measuring range it's the ability to 'sing' the note, not just 'hit' it that counts. Ivan Rebroff's four and a half octave range is not the widest recorded, but it's the fullness of every note that takes the breath away. (Elvis was about two and a half(ish) octaves, Roy Orbison just over three). Enjoy.

phpBB [video]

Re: Masterpiece of Voice

Thu Dec 12, 2013 6:02 am

I thought this was a topic on Voice!

Image

Voice, 1973
L-R: Pete Cummings, Billy Blackwood, Sherrill Nielsen, Tommy Hensley, Donnie Sumner, Tim Baty, and Per Erik "Pete" Hallin

Re: Masterpiece of Voice

Thu Dec 12, 2013 6:12 am

mike edwards66 wrote:When measuring range it's the ability to 'sing' the note, not just 'hit' it that counts. Ivan Rebroff's four and a half octave range is not the widest recorded, but it's the fullness of every note that takes the breath away. (Elvis was about two and a half(ish) octaves, Roy Orbison just over three). Enjoy.

phpBB [video]



It's a bit dubious to be including falsetto when talking about range though.

Re: Masterpiece of Voice

Thu Dec 12, 2013 11:05 am

Josh Turner got an amazing voice.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uFz61X2PQTw

Paul Robeson:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eh9WayN7R-s
:smt006

Re: Masterpiece of Voice

Thu Dec 12, 2013 4:23 pm

German-born Hans-Rolf Rippert (aka Ivan Rebroff) was quite an well-known and loved act in Germany. Great voice, too.

Not as good as Roger Whittaker, though... :wink:

Re: Masterpiece of Voice

Thu Dec 12, 2013 5:12 pm

drjohncarpenter wrote:I thought this was a topic on Voice!

I was hoping.

I could go for a little "Killing Me Softly" right now.

Re: Masterpiece of Voice

Thu Dec 12, 2013 5:19 pm

It sounds like J.D. and Sherill sings a duett!

Re: Masterpiece of Voice

Thu Dec 12, 2013 5:30 pm

God, those guys look ridiculous. The only things I find acceptable of the 70's era outifts/hairdo's are Elvis'. And that's probably cause I spent the last 20 years digesting them! :-)

Re: Masterpiece of Voice

Fri Dec 13, 2013 1:32 am

TJ wrote: It's a bit dubious to be including falsetto when talking about range though.


Dubious, not at all. In the broadest terms 'range' refers to all the notes that a singer can produce, starting from the lowest and reaching to the highest. In other words the distance between the lowest and the highest is the 'range'.

Now it's true that if Rebroff had concentrated on opera alone, his falsetto would have been ignored for the purposes of range. since falsetto pitches are not used in most opera. But Rebroff had a wide and varied repertoire that made it possible for him to use and display his mighty range.

The challenge when using the falsetto is in the (breath) control and the vibrancy of the sound. Often falsetto will sound 'thin' in comparison to the head voice or in particular the chest voice. This is where Rebroff excelled, his falsetto was controlled, loud and strong.

Re: Masterpiece of Voice

Fri Dec 13, 2013 2:23 am

Sherrill Nielson had an awesome falsetto.

Re: Masterpiece of Voice

Fri Dec 13, 2013 6:06 am

mike edwards66 wrote:
TJ wrote: It's a bit dubious to be including falsetto when talking about range though.


Dubious, not at all. In the broadest terms 'range' refers to all the notes that a singer can produce, starting from the lowest and reaching to the highest. In other words the distance between the lowest and the highest is the 'range'.

Now it's true that if Rebroff had concentrated on opera alone, his falsetto would have been ignored for the purposes of range. since falsetto pitches are not used in most opera. But Rebroff had a wide and varied repertoire that made it possible for him to use and display his mighty range.

The challenge when using the falsetto is in the (breath) control and the vibrancy of the sound. Often falsetto will sound 'thin' in comparison to the head voice or in particular the chest voice. This is where Rebroff excelled, his falsetto was controlled, loud and strong.


I don't disagree with any of that. All I meant was that in comparing his range with that of Elvis and Orbison, you took into account the falsetto for him, but not for them.

Re: Masterpiece of Voice

Fri Dec 13, 2013 11:54 am

Rob wrote:
drjohncarpenter wrote:I thought this was a topic on Voice!

I was hoping.

I could go for a little "Killing Me Softly" right now.

So you have to push the granny softly under the bus... :lol:

Re: Masterpiece of Voice

Sat Dec 14, 2013 1:44 am

TJ wrote:I don't disagree with any of that. All I meant was that in comparing his range with that of Elvis and Orbison, you took into account the falsetto for him, but not for them.

I think we are basically in agreement TJ. The distinction I would make is between 'sung' and 'hit' notes. For example, I would argue the B flat on Surrender is hit rather than sung. Although to be fair it is on a difficult vowel sound. So with falsetto Elvis could 'stretch and hit' to extend his range, but more practically he was two and a half(ish) octaves.


By contrast Rebroff was comfortable wihin his range. As I said:
mike edwards66 wrote:Suffice to say, unique voice, four and a half octaves of pure clarity. His controlled falsetto is louder and stronger than traditional falsetto. His bass is rich, with fully rounded vowels, and could make the ground shake. He moves swiftly and smoothly from one octave to the next, his low notes are very low, his high notes are sustained without strain.


But let us not get hung up on 'range'. As Leonard Cohen said 'range is for backing singers', which I think makes the point perfectly.

Also to discuss Elvis' voice simply in terms of range is to do it a disservice. It would be more apt to discuss Elvis voice in terms of decibels ! His voice was voluminous almost to the point of his having natural reverb.

Re: Masterpiece of Voice

Sat Dec 14, 2013 2:01 am

drjohncarpenter wrote:Sherrill Nielson had an awesome falsetto.

As Elvis was prone to say, 'I'd like to ask Sherrill to strangle a cat, and then we'll do i'ts Now or Never'.

To be fair Sherrill was as technically competent as the next guy. I just think he was better suited to ensemble rather than solo.


Winston wrote:It sounds like J.D. and Sherill sings a duett!

Well I don't know about that, but you have reminded me of a wonderful (individual opinions may vary) performance by George Younce (bass) and Larry Ford (tenor).
phpBB [video]