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Jerry Reed at Capitol Records - 1956 / 1958

Sat Nov 30, 2013 12:04 am

For any of you wanting to sample Jerry''s earliest recordings (and a couple of later Elvis-related tracks !), please see this link (and then just click on the album title) :

http://unclegil.blogspot.com.es/2013/11/if-good-lords-willin.html

Of course, if you want the real, complete thing, you gotta get this fantastic Bear Family CD. Great sound quality, great songs, great performances :

http://www.allmusic.com/album/release/here-i-am-mr0001181843

More information about Reed's early discography here :

http://rcs-discography.com/rcs/artist.php?key=reed4000
Last edited by Mister Moon on Sat Nov 30, 2013 1:57 pm, edited 2 times in total.

Re: Jerry Reed at Capitol Records - 1956 / 1958

Sat Nov 30, 2013 12:30 am

Mister Moon wrote:For any of you wanting to sample Jerry''s earliest recordings (and a couple of Elvis-related later tracks !), please see this link (and then just click on the album title) :

http://unclegil.blogspot.com.es/2013/11/if-good-lords-willin.html

Of course, if you want the real, complete thing, you gotta get this fantastic Bear Family CD. Great sound quality, great songs, great performances :

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Here-I-am-Jerry-REED/dp/B0000259MJ

More information about Reed's early discography here :

http://rcs-discography.com/rcs/artist.php?key=reed4000


Jerry Reed was a man of many talents, but I do love his connection to Elvis in 1967-1968 best.

The Reed influence in particular elevates all the material from Presley's January 1968 Nashville sessions at RCA's Studio B, and it's obvious the Presley arrangement of "Too Much Monkey Business" is borrowed from Jerry's recent recording of "Tupelo Mississippi Flash" -- Reed was probably the one who suggested the idea. In essence, Elvis covers a Chuck Berry classic using the arrangement from a song that was inspired by ... Elvis Presley!



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Jerry Reed "Tupelo Mississippi Flash" (RCA 47-9334, September 1967)
Recorded at RCA's Studio B, Nashville, September 1, 1967


Tupelo Mississippi Flash
Jerry Reed Hubbard
© Vector Music, BMI / Sixteen Stars Music, BMI

I'm gonna tell you a story that's all about
This job I had one time as a talent scout
I had a hard day at the office and the boss wasn't in town
The day this hairy-legged guitar picker just happened to come around
Well, he walks into my office with a great big grin
And folks, that's where my story really begins

He said, son, my name is Beauregard Rippy
I come to you from Tupelo, Mississippi
I write songs and I sing like a bird
I play licks on my guitar like you ain't never heard
But I'm down on my luck, things are just a little slack
I got a quarter in my pocket and the shirt on my back
But you buy me some supper, give me a place I can sleep
Said I'll sing you some songs that'll knock your hat in the creek
I got talent, boy, said back home they call me "the Tupelo Mississippi Flash"

Well, I knew I was in a room with some kind of a nut
When he pulled out that pack of used cigarette butts
So that's when I told him "We can't use you today"
So I hand the boy a dollar and I send him on his way
Well, the boss got back and we both had a laugh
When I told him 'bout "the Tupelo Mississippi Flash"
And pretty soon I had this story circulatin' around
About this Mississippi nut that we had in our town
I said, "Watch him everybody, the boy's squirrelly"
He walks around, callin' himself "the Tupelo Mississippi Flash"

Well, then it happened one day while I was drivin' to my home
I just a-happened to have my car radio on
When I heard a jockey ravin' 'bout a brand-new smash
By a kid called the "Tupelo Mississippi Flash"
Why, I almost wrecked my automobile
I went through a red light, I hit a traffic cop
Why, well my story's got an ending and it's short and sweet
The boss man, he fired me and left me out in the street
But I got a new job now, and I'm learnin' real fast
I'm-a drivin' the bus for "the Tupelo Mississippi Flash"

And his Cadillac, I'm drivin' that for him too
And that yacht he's got, and his aeroplane
Heh-heh, well "chauffeur, so good" I always say
Eh, "the Tupelo Mississippi..." who ever heard of him?
Why, I'll kill the boy ...




Image



"Tupelo Mississippi Flash" itself is also significant as a song "rumoured" to have been cut by Elvis then. However, most likely some who heard Reed laying down that same sweet guitar lick on Elvis' powerhouse version of "Too Much Monkey Business" got confused. Or maybe Reed jammed on "Tupelo Mississippi Flash" in between takes!

Also ... Elvis pal Marty Lacker has claimed the singer cut Reed's wonderful "Alabama Wild Man" at this time as well. However, he must be mistaken. The song was cut well after January 1968, in late May, and debuted as an RCA single in September. It's another terrific, hilarious folk tale, although this time it feels like a thinly-disguised version of Jerry's own story!



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Jerry Reed "Alabama Wild Man" (RCA 47-9623, September 21, 1968)
Recorded at RCA's Studio B, Nashville, May 31, 1968


Alabama Wild Man
Jerry Reed Hubbard
© Vector Music, BMI / Sixteen Stars Music, BMI

Well, my daddy was a hard-shelled Alabama preacher
My mama was a dedicated Sunday school teacher
My brother went to college, got a PhD
Daddy said the only dud in the family was me
He said, "Boy you ain't never gonna amount to a thing"
"You sit around with that silly looking guitar and sing"
"You hang around them juke joints most of your time"
"Making music like some wild man, done lost his mind"
"Going, 'Uh, hook it,' now what's that supposed to mean?"
"And 'Sock it to me, uh,' you're just a wild man, boy"

Well, one day daddy told me "Boy, I've had enough"
"You pack up that guitar, and you just pack up your stuff"
So I left with my guitar and organized me a band
Called myself the "Alabama Wild Man"

Well, I worked in every joint from New York to the Gulf
Singing songs for pennies never making enough
Many nights I lived on coffee and cold sardines
Soda crackers and pork and beans
But, friends, I finally went to Music City USA
Said "I'm the 'Alabama Wild Man,' folks, I'm here to stay"
Took my guitar and showed 'em what I's talking about
So we made a little record and we put it out
With me going "Uh hook it, boy, hook it, uh, hook it again, uh, sock it to that guitar"

Well, now I'm driving Cadillacs a city block long
And the "Alabama Wild Man" can do no wrong
Cause I'm selling them records and I'm a-working them shows
And people loves me everywhere I go

But, friends, a funny thing happened 'bout a week or so back
I worked a show in my hometown and the place was packed
And guess who was sittin' out on a front row seat
Was my daddy grinnin' up at me, pattin' his feet
Yellin' "Sock it to your daddy, Wild Man"
"Hook it boy, hook it, play that guitar, son, show 'em"
"Yeah, that's my boy alright, taught him everything he knows"
"Bought him his first guitar, ha-ha, keep them checks comin' in boy"
"We gonna pave the drive next week"
"Yeah, sock it to your daddy, Wild Man"
"Sock it to me, sock it to me, sock it to me, sock it to me, sock it to me, sock it to me"




Image



Here's a Billboard preview for the album:



Image

Billboard - October 19, 1968


Now, could Jerry Reed have had "Alabama Wild Man" already written when he joined Presley's January 1968 Nashville sessions at RCA's Studio B? Maybe, but since Elvis rejected all the non-soundtrack submissions and directly asked Jerry for ideas on material to record, one imagines he might have mentioned it, if so.

In listening to the late 1968 original of "Alabama Wild Man," Marty's memory must have confused its rollicking guitar sound with the wonderful cover of "Too Much Monkey Business." Reed essentially plays the same licks on both Nashville recordings.

It is further interesting that Jerry cut a remake of "Alabama Wild Man" four years later. He knew it was a hit in the making.



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Jerry Reed "Alabama Wild Man" (RCA 74-0763, June 26, 1972)


Indeed, it did even better on the charts, reaching Billboard Country #22 on September 16, 1972 (the original topped out at Country #48 on November 16, 1968).


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Billboard - September 16, 1972
Last edited by drjohncarpenter on Sat Nov 30, 2013 11:35 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Re: Jerry Reed at Capitol Records - 1956 / 1958

Sat Nov 30, 2013 2:52 am

Incredibly informative post, Doc. Thanks.

Reed was a one-of-a-kind character, and it's neat, and fitting, that Elvis and him got along so well, at least artistically.

Peter Guralnick's report of the sessions that produced Elvis' version of "Guitar Man", as related in "Careless Love", almost made me want to stand up and applaud. Fabulous stuff.

Take a listen to those early cuts, if you don't already know them. There's some filler, but many of the tracks are fantastic.

Please note that I've edited my post with a link that includes samples of the songs - some of them are probably on YouTube, anyway.

Thanks again !

Re: Jerry Reed at Capitol Records - 1956 / 1958

Sat Nov 30, 2013 7:58 pm

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LLMv58wWclo

Amazing :smt003 :smt006

Re: Jerry Reed at Capitol Records - 1956 / 1958

Sat Nov 30, 2013 10:02 pm

Great post, John, thank you.

I'm intrigued to know when Elvis first referred to himself as a squirrel? I know he did in in Vegas '69 but that came after this song.

Did he do it before?

If not, is Elvis referencing this song in his Vegas monolgues?

Re: Jerry Reed at Capitol Records - 1956 / 1958

Sat Nov 30, 2013 11:39 pm

George Smith wrote:Great post, John, thank you.

I'm intrigued to know when Elvis first referred to himself as a squirrel? I know he did in in Vegas '69 but that came after this song.

Did he do it before?

If not, is Elvis referencing this song in his Vegas monolgues?


I added some more to my above reply (lyrics and another label scan). Jerry Reed was such a great talent!

The "squirrelly" reference may have been common coin to Southerners like Elvis and Jerry, but one suspects the phrase was adopted by Presley after hearing "Tupelo Mississippi Flash" on the radio and working with Reed at that time in Nashville.

Re: Jerry Reed at Capitol Records - 1956 / 1958

Sat Nov 30, 2013 11:54 pm

As an addition to Reed's Capitol legacy, here's "Crazy Legs" by Gene Vincent and his Blue Caps.

This song was never recorded by Reed himself, but it's another example of a song with fabulous wordplay, and to me it's one of the best tracks in the Vincent discography.

It was cut in June 1956 by Vincent backed by the first Blue Caps lineup (**), and released as a single by Capitol backed with "Important Words" in December of the same year :

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-----------------------

(**)
--Cliff Gallup - lead guitar
--Willie Williams - acoustic rhythm guitar
--Jack Neal - standup bass
--Dickie Harrell - drums
Last edited by Mister Moon on Mon Dec 02, 2013 12:42 am, edited 2 times in total.

Re: Jerry Reed at Capitol Records - 1956 / 1958

Sun Dec 01, 2013 1:15 am

drjohncarpenter wrote:
"Tupelo Mississippi Flash" itself is also significant as a song "rumoured" to have been cut by Elvis then. However, most likely some who heard Reed laying down that same sweet guitar lick on Elvis' powerhouse version of "Too Much Monkey Business" got confused. Or maybe Reed jammed on "Tupelo Mississippi Flash" in between takes!


Thank you for the information! Incidentally, at about 1:18 of the following video you can hear Elvis say some of the lines used in the fade out of "Tupelo, Mississippi Flash". This does not suggest they jammed on this song in between takes but it suggests to me that Elvis was highly familiar with Reed and his recording of the song and probably enjoyed it.

The lines are "Why I oughta kill the boy" and "who ever heard of it" and "The boy's squirrely". If someone else already mentioned these lines, then I sincerely apologize. I tried to make sure I didn't but perhaps I missed something.

The 1:18 mark:
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Re: Jerry Reed at Capitol Records - 1956 / 1958

Sun Dec 01, 2013 3:28 am

Mister Moon wrote:As an addition to Reed's Capitol legacy, here's "Crazy Legs" by Gene Vincent and his Blue Caps.

This song was never recorded by Reed himself, but it's another example of a song with fabulous wordplay, and to me it's one of the best tracks in the Vincent discography.

It was cut in 1956 by Vincent backed by the first Blue Caps lineup (**), and released as a single by Capitol in early 1957 :

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-----------------------

(**)
--Cliff Gallup - lead guitar
--Willie Williams - acoustic rhythm guitar
--Jack Neal - standup bass
--Dickie Harrell - drums


Never noticed that B-side was a Jerry Reed composition. Very neat indeed!


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Gene Vincent and His Blue Caps "Crazy Legs" (Capitol F3617, December 29, 1956)
B-side written by Jerry Reed, it did not chart.
Recorded June 24, 1956 at Owen Bradley's Film & Recording Studio, Nashville, TN




561229_Capitol F3617_Vincent.JPG



Capitol did a full-page ad push in January 1957, but neither song charted.


Billboard Jan 05 1957 p31.JPG
Billboard - January 5, 1957
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

Re: Jerry Reed at Capitol Records - 1956 / 1958

Sun Dec 01, 2013 3:34 am

zane7570 wrote:
drjohncarpenter wrote:"Tupelo Mississippi Flash" itself is also significant as a song "rumoured" to have been cut by Elvis then. However, most likely some who heard Reed laying down that same sweet guitar lick on Elvis' powerhouse version of "Too Much Monkey Business" got confused. Or maybe Reed jammed on "Tupelo Mississippi Flash" in between takes!


Thank you for the information! Incidentally, at about 1:18 of the following video you can hear Elvis say some of the lines used in the fade out of "Tupelo, Mississippi Flash". This does not suggest they jammed on this song in between takes but it suggests to me that Elvis was highly familiar with Reed and his recording of the song and probably enjoyed it.

The lines are "Why I oughta kill the boy" and "who ever heard of it" and "The boy's squirrely". If someone else already mentioned these lines, then I sincerely apologize. I tried to make sure I didn't but perhaps I missed something.

The 1:18 mark:
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Very good spot, and kind of proves how much Elvis dug the song.

Heck, it was on RCA and a tribute to HIS story, after all!

Re: Jerry Reed at Capitol Records - 1956 / 1958

Sun Dec 01, 2013 5:48 pm

Could someone please post Jerry's countrified version of "My Boy". He recorded it for RCA in 1972.

Re: Jerry Reed at Capitol Records - 1956 / 1958

Sun Dec 01, 2013 5:51 pm

From "Nashville Underground" LP

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Nashville Underground (1968)

1. Remembering
2. A Thing Called Love
3. You Wouldn't Know A Good Thing
4. Save Your Dreams
5. Almost Crazy
6. You've Been Cryin' Again
7. Fine On My Mind
8. Tupelo Mississippi Flash
9. Wabash Cannonball
10. Hallelujah, I Love Her So
11. John Henry

Re: Jerry Reed at Capitol Records - 1956 / 1958

Mon Dec 02, 2013 12:56 am

drjohncarpenter wrote:
Mister Moon wrote:As an addition to Reed's Capitol legacy, here's "Crazy Legs" by Gene Vincent and his Blue Caps.

This song was never recorded by Reed himself, but it's another example of a song with fabulous wordplay, and to me it's one of the best tracks in the Vincent discography.

It was cut in 1956 by Vincent backed by the first Blue Caps lineup (**), and released as a single by Capitol in early 1957 :

phpBB [video]


-----------------------

(**)
--Cliff Gallup - lead guitar
--Willie Williams - acoustic rhythm guitar
--Jack Neal - standup bass
--Dickie Harrell - drums


Never noticed that B-side was a Jerry Reed composition. Very neat indeed!


phpBB [video]

Gene Vincent and His Blue Caps "Crazy Legs" (Capitol F3617, December 29, 1956)
B-side written by Jerry Reed, it did not chart.
Recorded June 24, 1956 at Owen Bradley's Film & Recording Studio, Nashville, TN




561229_Capitol F3617_Vincent.JPG



Capitol did a full-page ad push in January 1957, but neither song charted.


Billboard Jan 05 1957 p31.JPG
Billboard - January 5, 1957


Thanks for your post with the additional stuff, Doc. I wrote mine from memory, as I didn't have the data at hand, and so I missed the exact / correct dates. I've edited my post accordingly.

It's great to see that "Billboard" ad. That photo of Gene was used in the back cover of his first album, "Bluejean Bop !", and has always reminded me of the classic 1955 photo used for the front cover of Elvis' first long player. Anyway, I've never seen it so complete until now. Good find !

bjb.jpeg
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