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Bobby Darin - The Proper Gander & Questions (1968)

Wed Dec 14, 2011 4:14 pm

At Last. I have uploaded on YouTube a Darin song with out it getting blocked Worldwide :lol: -

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_1xlxrBsmhY

What follows is the Opening track to the underrated 1968 " Bobby Darin Born Walden Roberto Cassotto". Guess this means that Warners music Group does not own the copyright of it :mrgreen:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C38qavNXrcY
Last edited by Robt on Thu Dec 15, 2011 4:32 am, edited 1 time in total.

Re: Bobby Darin - The Proper Gander & Questions (1968)

Wed Dec 14, 2011 10:21 pm

This is a remarkable album, showing Darin to be one of the most versatile performers ever to walk the planet. Who else could have sung Dylan-style protest songs, jazz, swing, show tunes, easy listening, rock n roll, pop, blues, country, folk, gospel songs - and penned songs in each and every one of those genres!

The Proper Gander uses a wonderful metaphor of mice fighting a non-existent siamese cat in order for darin to give his views on the vietnam war, whereas Questions covers the issue of polution. Jingle Jangle Jungle and Bullfrog (in which Darin has a conversation with said creature) deal with the issues of consumerism and Long Line Rider tells the story of murders at a prison farm which saw quite a furore when Darin was told he couldn't sing it on a TV variety show in the run up the election. The second side is weaker in my opinion: Change is possibly the most Dylan-like song on the album, and I Can See The Wind lacks any real melodic, structural or lyrical hook as Darin sings, presumably, about the effects of LSD. Sunday is a hard-hitting critique of organised religion ("Sunday, look at all the blood you've shed"). In Memoriam is Darin's tribute to Robert Kennedy to whom he was very close and the killing of him, so it is said, was the event that caused Darin to basically give up the career he had established for himself over the last decade or so and write and perform these considerably less commercial pieces.

Darin's direction recordings are now thankfully all available on CD, along with various live tracks and songs that were unreleased at the time. The second LP, Commitment, was an improvement on the high-standard of the first LP, with Darin allowing himself to be a little less serious the second time around, and his gift for quirky lyrics and melody come to the fore to make it a much more enjoyable album for those who don't "dig" the messages. Me and Mr Hohner finds Darin attempting a primitive kind of rap as he talks his way through the story of him and his harmonica. Sausalito (about Ronald Reagan) boasts a beautiful melody, Water Colour Canvas and Distractions feature brilliant lyrics, and Jive is a belated entry in the jug-band style used in songs like Daydream by the Loving Spoonful.

What is perhaps heartbreaking is that what is generally thought to be material that was intended for a third album for Direction is even better. Alas, Darin released it all as singles or kept it unreleased and the album was never finished. But it probably the highest quality material of this phase: Simple Song of Freedom, Baby May, RX-Pyro Prescription Fire (not sure what it's about, but Darin sure was kinky, as he sings about "peanut butter taken in the other way"!), Sweet Reasons and Song For A Dollar are all top-notch. Two more songs emerged a few years back, City Lights and Route 58, and I wouldn't be surprised if there were more where that came from. Also slowly leaking out on releases are the live recordings Darin made during the period, and I'm sure the full concert will emerge at some point. Collectors Choice were talking about a release at some point, but that seemed to go on the back burner, which is a shame.

Re: Bobby Darin - The Proper Gander & Questions (1968)

Thu Dec 15, 2011 1:29 am

Thanks. Glad someone here appreciated the songs. Your post regarding the 1968 record, I couldn't have put it any better myself :smt003 I love the record and Bobby took some commercial risks including a new independant label and slight name change to Bob Darin. Shame it wasn't accepted.

Re: Bobby Darin - The Proper Gander & Questions (1968)

Thu Dec 15, 2011 3:37 am

Indeed. His work for Motown (where he went after Direction) is largely disappointing with the exception of Sail Away, Happy and the 1971 live album (released 1987) which is probably his best live recording. He was still capable of great things, as the performances from the TV series show, but he didn't appear to choose channel his energies into the recording studio. Where have we heard that before?

Re: Bobby Darin - The Proper Gander & Questions (1968)

Sun Jan 01, 2012 1:00 am

I believe the reason Darin finally gave in and once more became Bobby Darin was financial. He wasn't working as often as he once had and with health issues increasingly taking financial tolls as well as physical tolls-his hand was forced.

Darin's career and life is one of the most incredible ones you could ever dream of. A monumental talent who excelled at most everything he tried. As is said of many, but truly in this case, gone way too early. Bobby is easily as influential on me as is Elvis, although Elvis is my ultimate favorite. Bobby runs a close...very, very close second in my heart.

Re: Bobby Darin - The Proper Gander & Questions (1968)

Sun Jan 01, 2012 8:45 pm

Greybeard wrote:I believe the reason Darin finally gave in and once more became Bobby Darin was financial. He wasn't working as often as he once had and with health issues increasingly taking financial tolls as well as physical tolls-his hand was forced.

Darin's career and life is one of the most incredible ones you could ever dream of. A monumental talent who excelled at most everything he tried. As is said of many, but truly in this case, gone way too early. Bobby is easily as influential on me as is Elvis, although Elvis is my ultimate favorite. Bobby runs a close...very, very close second in my heart.


I have to agree with this. The difference between the two men and how they ran their lives and career is remarkable. Darin I can admire as a person, Elvis I cannot, no matter how much I might love his music.