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A Few Sinatra Rarities

Sun Jul 31, 2011 6:02 pm

I Wish You Love

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fUXDCyP9 ... re=related

Sorry Seems to Be the Hardest Word

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cIfdJLwR ... re=related

Evergreen

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tW_iErDs4nY

All By Myself

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HabMN5po ... re=related

Isn't She Lovely

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mfslvMkhfWk

For the Good Times

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d-ncfn40gUw

Remember

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VUZYEvAiNYY

Never Gonna Fall in Love Again

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4891hP7NvFI

Re: A Few Sinatra Rarities

Sun Jul 31, 2011 6:13 pm

That version of All By Myself "escaped" over here in the UK briefly around 2000 when the entire concert was coupled with PD recordings as a double CD set. It didn't last long, it has to be said. interestingly the concert also had The Hungry Years on it and If sung with just Sinatra and Mottola. The sound was good too. Like Sorry Seems To Be The Hardest Word, Hungry Years was a bit half-hearted and only seemed to feature one verse rather than the whole thing.

Sinatra seemed to be lost during the 70s, trying a bit of this and that before finally deciding on the biggest recording project of his career in Trilogy. Quite why he never fnished the recording of Evergreen I'm not sure, for it's considerably better than some of the 70s singles he put out.

I have a couple of hundred Sinatra concerts kicking around on an external hard drive, which I really must sort out at some point. Putting it on youtube is futile as it just comes down again! But why a decent set of rare sinatra isn't put out by warner or whoever owns the later stuff, i'm not really sure. shove it in a nice box with the title "here's to the band" and you have a bestseller!

Re: A Few Sinatra Rarities

Sun Jul 31, 2011 6:39 pm

I couldn't find The Hungry Years on YouTube, but it has been there -- I ripped it to a disc some time ago . . . It's a great song, and I quite like Frank's performance, but the recording I have is very poor.

Frank had a lot of ideas for projects during the '70s - and '80s - that didn't always come to fruition; and looking at what went unreleased, it does look like a mixed and uncertain bag. But probably wouldn't have been the case had something more materialised . . . Here's to the Ladies, for example, would have been a new album with Nelson Riddle, but this was abandoned after several recordings were made.

I suppose, the greatest loss, was a - planned - triple album with Lena Horne and an all-star jazz band - including Miles Davis - that was ready to go with Quincy Jones conducting, until Lena got ill. With various other commitments, etc., it was never rescheduled; the result for Sinatra and Q being L.A. is My Lady -- and what an incredible band was assembled for those sessions!!! George Benson, The Brecker Brothers, Snooky Young, Bill Watrous, Frank Foster, Tony Mottolla, Lionel Hampton, Gene Cherico, Irv Cottler and so many, many more . . . It was a very good album; but the thought of what might have been is quite heartbreaking; Jones calling it the biggest loss of his career.

There were also numerous attempts to make an album with Ella; but things always seemed to get in the way. Even when final details had been made, charts arranged and songs chosen -- as per the Horne/Jones project. With the great things Frank Sinatra achieved over a career that spanned from 1935 to 1995, it's amazing to think that there are still a few moments of "what if" along with the occassional disappointment of what didn't happen.

Re: A Few Sinatra Rarities

Sun Jul 31, 2011 8:32 pm

I have to say the Ella album would/should have been fantastic. There have been rumours that Granz put a stop to it, but he wasn't managing Ella when she was at Reprise in the late 60s - just a couple of years after the brilliant TV special with her and Frank. With both of them on the same label, it would have been the idea time. I will have to try and get the Sinatra concerts out and get some of the rarities out there on youtube. I have just watched the DVD that comes with the Sinatra: Vegas box. It's not Frank's finest hour, with rambling monologues and surprisingly off-tune singing on occasion, with the mix not helping as his voice is way out front when it should be sitting there nicely atop of the band. A bit of a shame given the stunning contents of the rest of the box.

Re: A Few Sinatra Rarities

Sun Jul 31, 2011 8:53 pm

I'm quite fond of the DVD that comes with Sinatra/Vegas -- Frank is certainly chatty, though . . . And there are some outstanding performances on there. I thought you would have enjoyed that one.

Still, 1977 to 1987 were great, great years for Sinatra. He was in fine voice, recorded some terrific material, toured the globe putting on sensational concerts and gave some of his finest, most dedicated acting performances . . . It's one of my favourite periods of his.

Re: A Few Sinatra Rarities

Sun Jul 31, 2011 9:30 pm

I have to say that my favourite Sinatra album came from that period: She Shot Me Down. A neglected masterpiece, I think. So great to see it back in print.

Re: A Few Sinatra Rarities

Sun Jul 31, 2011 9:47 pm

Oh, indeed . . . She Shot Me Down is a masterpiece of an album, that contains one outstanding recording after another. Sinatra was on fine, fine form; with a touch of gravel in his voice, but phrasing to die for and an assured panache and affinity for every single lyric. As far as late-period albums are concerned, they don't come much better than this . . .

Re: A Few Sinatra Rarities

Sun Jul 31, 2011 10:06 pm

You may like this, although, you have likely seen it . . .

Thanks for the Memory

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eYVakOQzd6A

Just pure class . . .

Re: A Few Sinatra Rarities

Mon Aug 01, 2011 1:02 am

Yes, there's some nice performances in that TV special - just a shame there was no audience (a very odd choice, I always thought). How do these TV shows look on the most recent releases, do you know? I haven't picked them up yet but have heard conflicting reports.

Re: A Few Sinatra Rarities

Mon Aug 01, 2011 1:15 am

The show that I was talking about earlier with the Hungry Years is now available from itunes and amazon in the UK again - but not in the States.

Re: A Few Sinatra Rarities

Mon Aug 01, 2011 2:01 pm

I don't know how those new DVD's look or sound -- I've also read mixed reviews. But the big box-set looks superb, at least . . . And some of the individual DVD releases are tempting, just out of curiosity.

I'm not with iTunes, but always keep an eye out for Sinatra discs that have been off the market for a while -- concerts and live rarities, mostly . . .

Re: A Few Sinatra Rarities

Mon Aug 01, 2011 2:27 pm

its on amazon download too if that helps!

Re: A Few Sinatra Rarities

Mon Aug 01, 2011 2:43 pm

Yes, that's better for me. Cheers.

Re: A Few Sinatra Rarities

Tue Aug 09, 2011 12:10 pm

do you have the earliest version of "night and day" ?

Re: A Few Sinatra Rarities

Tue Aug 09, 2011 8:58 pm

From 1942, a most gorgeous version of Night and Day . . . Sinatra's voice was clear as glass during the 1940s; his phrasing and breath-control unmatched, and feel for a song growing with every performance and recording session.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0__9gz1Z1To

Re: A Few Sinatra Rarities

Tue Aug 23, 2011 2:18 am

Many people on the elvis forum is band oriented, or 60's oriented, always comparing Elvis with Beatles or whoever, but understanding the careers of Frank Sinatra and other singers (Tony Bennett, Tom Jones, Roy Orbison) in the 70's helps a lot to understand Elvis's own career. An insider of the Sinatra era sums it up perfectly when he says that up to 68-69 there was a huge "adult" audience and the usual big teenage audience. In the 90's that market came again. But in the 70's and 80's, there was a kind of disrespect for anyone over 25 years, a lack of direction for recording artists of Sinatra and Elvis caliber, who by the way were selling out the same big stadiums.

The market for adult music was for the most part only present in the country and western field (which helped Elvis a lot). Elvis, btw, was the only "adult" figure to achieve impressive selling numbers, with a 3 platinum LP in 72 and another in 73 and with an amazing floor of 200-400 thousand records. Tom Jones, after 8 years of dismal records sales and changes in material and producers, refuged himself in 1980 on Mercury records country division, where he started selling some records again. Great and famous singers such as Tony Bennett or Tom Jones were literally "fired" by their record companies.

Re: A Few Sinatra Rarities

Tue Aug 23, 2011 3:19 am

frus75 wrote:Many people on the elvis forum is band oriented, or 60's oriented, always comparing Elvis with Beatles or whoever, but understanding the careers of Frank Sinatra and other singers (Tony Bennett, Tom Jones, Roy Orbison) in the 70's helps a lot to understand Elvis's own career. An insider of the Sinatra era sums it up perfectly when he says that up to 68-69 there was a huge "adult" audience and the usual big teenage audience. In the 90's that market came again. But in the 70's and 80's, there was a kind of disrespect for anyone over 25 years, a lack of direction for recording artists of Sinatra and Elvis caliber, who by the way were selling out the same big stadiums.

The market for adult music was for the most part only present in the country and western field (which helped Elvis a lot). Elvis, btw, was the only "adult" figure to achieve impressive selling numbers, with a 3 platinum LP in 72 and another in 73 and with an amazing floor of 200-400 thousand records. Tom Jones, after 8 years of dismal records sales and changes in material and producers, refuged himself in 1980 on Mercury records country division, where he started selling some records again. Great and famous singers such as Tony Bennett or Tom Jones were literally "fired" by their record companies.


Tony Bennett made what were, for him, disastrous recordings in the late 60s of pop-oriented material and didn't record again for some years - but I think the parting of the ways with Columbia was a joint decision due to artistic differences rather than a firing. In the same vein, Ella Fitzgerald had no permanent contract from 1966-1973 (although some of the material she recorded during this period now has cult status and is finally being recognised as great stuff). Doris Day retired from the music scene in 1966, with Julie London following suit in 1969, and Sinatra did the same in 1971. Meanwhile Mel Torme was on a musical hiatus. But these were all singers of standards which Elvis and Tom Jones were not (although Jones certainly dabbled rather effectively in that area). I'm not sure that the movie away from singers of the Great American Songbook had an effect on Presley. In fact with Prelsey moving more into country, he should have been selling more records with Johnny Cash, Glen Campbell and the like at their peaks and selling millions of records.

If there was a disrespect of Elvis during the early 70s it was probably the fault of the releasing schedule which saw hit singles tucked away on albums of movie songs and the like. And then there were a number of poor albums of "new" material meaning that there was no consistency in quality. Elvis was never guesting on tv shows of the period to sell his albums either - audiences during the period wanted to get to know performers by seeing them on variety shows, talk shows etc but Elvis never allowed this to happen. I think his fortunes in the way of sales would have been considerably altered through appearances on the likes of the Johnny Cash show, Dean Martin Show, Bobby Darin show and so on. It would have been artistically worthwhile for him to be doing duets with those singers he respected, the exposure would also have been good of course.

Re: A Few Sinatra Rarities

Tue Aug 23, 2011 3:34 am

frus75 wrote:Many people on the elvis forum is band oriented, or 60's oriented, always comparing Elvis with Beatles or whoever, but understanding the careers of Frank Sinatra and other singers (Tony Bennett, Tom Jones, Roy Orbison) in the 70's helps a lot to understand Elvis's own career. An insider of the Sinatra era sums it up perfectly when he says that up to 68-69 there was a huge "adult" audience and the usual big teenage audience. In the 90's that market came again. But in the 70's and 80's, there was a kind of disrespect for anyone over 25 years, a lack of direction for recording artists of Sinatra and Elvis caliber, who by the way were selling out the same big stadiums.

The market for adult music was for the most part only present in the country and western field (which helped Elvis a lot). Elvis, btw, was the only "adult" figure to achieve impressive selling numbers, with a 3 platinum LP in 72 and another in 73 and with an amazing floor of 200-400 thousand records. Tom Jones, after 8 years of dismal records sales and changes in material and producers, refuged himself in 1980 on Mercury records country division, where he started selling some records again. Great and famous singers such as Tony Bennett or Tom Jones were literally "fired" by their record companies.


Other than a period of time during the early 1950s, Sinatra's career and artistry rarely lacked direction. He released relatively few albums during the 1970s and had entered into retirement for a period of two years between 1971 and 1973.

As an artist, during the 1970s, Sinatra had been around longer than most but was still capable of challenging himself to make excellent music. Trilogy: Past, Present and Future - released in 1980 - was not only one of the most wide-reaching, complex and ambitious projects of Sinatra's career, it was an album that went places few would even dare. Its commercial success vindicated such ambition and artistic vision.

And, if a decade earlier, Sinatra, one of the most critically and commercially succesful album-makers of the 1960s entered the 1970s floundering on Billboard with Watertown and Sinatra and Company, creativity was hardly amiss -- especially with regards to Watertown; a contemporary concept album of rare depth.

However, three of the six regular Sinatra albums released during the 1970s went Gold. Ol' Blue Eyes is Back being a major success as both an album and a TV special -- the former selling well in excess of 500,000 copies domestically. And although The Main Event failed to climb the upper-rungs of the charts, this also went Gold. Whilst Sinatra's historic 1974 concert broadcast live from Madison Square Garden won raves and was seen by millions across North and South America -- and, ultimately, millions more around the globe. And the concert stage was a place Sinatra had few equals as a top-draw -- even in his 60s and 70s. Through personal appearances, Sinatra truly thrived during the latter portion of his career as he played everywhere from America to England, Scotland, Japan, China, Australia, Brazil, Egypt, Holland, Ireland, Sweden, Germany, Austria, Sweden, Jerusalem, Spain, Italy, Portugal, South Africa, Greece . . . Almost everywhere except Russia, where attempts to arrange a tour wasn't successful.

If anything, Sinatra's only misstep during the era we're discussing was that he acted too little. He was able to pick and choose roles, of course -- but Sinatra may not have been a leading man whose name sold a picture in the ways it once did. And such is true of most any actor aged over 60 -- but the right project can do wonders, and Sinatra was afforded a great deal of hype, finding a large audience and great reviews for his 1977 picture on NBC, Contract On Cherry Street.

But that was typical of Sinatra, who rarely rested on his laurels or spread himself thin . . . And I always admired that.