In this section you can submit questions to people that knew Elvis, or to other important people in the Elvis World.

Re: vic colonna

Mon Nov 12, 2007 1:41 pm

HI JUAN LUIS,

yeah, i try to listen to as much as i can, all genres. johnny pacheco got me started on salsa many years ago when i heard…

but instead let me give you a little ditty i wrote after watching "buena vista social club"


Buena Vista Social Club

That debonair Diablo Ry Cooder can be blamed for this: bringing to the public’s consciousness some sublime music that had been virtually forgotten thanks to Fidel and his thugs with the able cooperation of our own State Department. It was Ry Cooder’s “Buena Vista Social Club” album in 1997 that led to the making of this documentary (one that I had meant to watch for years and inexplicably never did) and earned him a $25,000 fine from Big Brother (Yes, Virginia, the Butthole Surfers are not just an alterna-tive band). Forgotten in one sense, perhaps, but Ned Sublette calls Cuban music “the elephant in the living room” and makes an impressive case for its significance and con-tributions to European and American music since the Spanish invaded this island paradise and its neighbors hundreds of years ago.
Indeed, the Cuban son of the late 19th century transformed itself into salsa in the 1970’s. (1) New York saw its influence throughout the 20th century in jazz, R & B (pre and post rock ‘n’ roll’s emergence), pop, and not just from the recorded music—great com-posers, the likes of Cole Porter and George Gershwin, as Timothy Brennan said, “knew a good thing” when they heard it.
The Cuban son, the popular dance music of Cuba, is African rhythms fused with European melodic styles. The members of the Buena Vista Social Club were and are extraordinary musicians as this documentary personifies. Scattered and forgotten, even in their homeland, they are now an industry and BVSC has taken on a life of its own since Ry Cooder’s Grammy–winning album and the success of this subsequent docu-mentary. The members of BVSC as corralled by Ry Cooder are Juan de Marcos Gon-zález, Ibrahim Ferrer, Rubén González, Compay Segundo, Ry Cooder, Pío Leyva, Manuel "Puntillita" Licea, Orlando "Cachaito" López, Manuel "Guajiro" Mirabal, Eliades Ochoa, Omara Portuondo, Barbarito Torres, Amadito Valdés, and Joachim Cooder.
Halfway through this film I find myself expecting more and not getting it. Maybe I just don’t get it. There is a disjointed feel. They are telling a story that needs a bit more co-hesion. The music is wonderful and “finding” Ibrahim Ferrer and describing him as a Spanish Nat “King” Cole is the best line thus far. He seems to be the best of this crew and that is probably why he batted leadoff. His story reminds me of another great musi-cian I will discuss later. This film needs a narrative; a voice–over that links the segments and peppers us with historical data that will enhance the snippets we get from the musi-cians. They all seem to have two things in common: they started life as small boys with amazing musical prowess and now they are old men who have not forgotten a thing. I am just not hearing exactly what it was like in their musical heyday and how they felt in the years they were forgotten.
It is heartwarming to see this cast of cast–offs return to the spotlight; we are treated to one delightful performance after another. Called “a bizarre band that never existed” at one point in the film, that seems an apt description. There is a decidedly happy feel to the film but I want to know more about the years of torment; the heart-break; how they survived the fall. This is a wonderful story of triumph, belated success and recognition, a tale of deserving people finally “getting their due.” From crowded bar-rios to crowds flocking to see you at Carnegie Hall—this is storybook stuff. Ry Cooder is to be commended for turning dreams into reality; he changed many lives with his project and gave back to the world something it did not even realize it was missing. I watched a couple of the performances more than once, but only because I had the DVD right in front of me. The CD and its spinoffs are more to my liking and I will fill in the gaps and answer the questions posed by what I saw with some follow–up reading. Highly recom-mended if you want to kick back and hear some great music; just don’t start thinking too much about the how and why as I did or a bit of frustration might creep in.

two footnotes to this one:

(1) That wonderful style, not the commercialized blend that supplanted it, introduced me to Johnny Pacheco and Tampica ’71. Just try and find one of their albums now. If you do you will get to hear the world’s greatest flautist, bar none.

(2) Ibrahim Ferrer’s story brought to mind a similar tale. There was a boy who arrived on these shores from England, just one year old, in 1909. He started playing the violin when he was four. It was not long before those around him realized they had a prodigy on their hands. He was compared to Yehoudi Menhuen (sp?). He practiced up to six hours a day from the time he was six. His father died when he was 15 and he was forced to quit school and go to work to support his mother and brother. He continued to play and was much in demand at weddings, other social gatherings, and often appeared on the radio locally in the 1920s. He continued to work at New Departure, a division of General Motors, and when it came time to get married in 1935 he had to choose: life as a member of the Hartford Symphony as their first violinist (many days of being away from home; travel by bus and rail) or the stability of the factory where he could go home to the woman he loved every night. The violin went into the case and into the closet. He had finished school at night and taken correspondence courses (the equivalent of college in those days) so he was a rising star at New Departure. He rose to the level of production control manager. He was the one who decided just what and how much this factory would produce: A vital task during the war years. His father, my grandfather after whom I am called Sam, was a whiz kid in his own right and designed much of the machinery that this plant used for five decades. When I was 13, having heard all about my father from my mother and aunts and uncles but never having heard him play, I finally coaxed him into going into the closet and toting out that violin. He always said, “I’m too rusty.” on the many occasions I had asked him to play. I was a little older now, learning saxophone (maybe that helped), and he finally consented. After some tuning and picking (what he explained was pizzicato), and the picking was amazing, he took a deep breath and the bow took on a life of its own. His fingers were a blur. I was mesmerized. I later learned that, after a 13–year layoff, my dad had just ripped through a flawless performance of “Flight of the Bumblebee.” ‘Nuff said.

Re: vic colonna

Mon Nov 12, 2007 1:52 pm

a movie, huh? paul can only be played by johnny depp. as for vic: since he has often been described as short, fat, and his mother dresses him funny this is a real challenge. where is charlie chaplin when we need him? you decide who should play vic and when you know meet me at the corner of WALK and DON'T WALK for a cuppa joe. :mrgreen:

Re: vic colonna

Mon Nov 12, 2007 1:55 pm

i'm having way too much fun here, folks. i just might move from this cave to a little cabin on the hill. :twisted:

Re: vic colonna

Mon Nov 12, 2007 3:13 pm

viccolonna@gmail.com wrote:a movie, huh? paul can only be played by johnny depp. as for vic: since he has often been described as short, fat, and his mother dresses him funny this is a real challenge. where is charlie chaplin when we need him? you decide who should play vic and when you know meet me at the corner of WALK and DON'T WALK for a cuppa joe. :mrgreen:



What about this Guy .. Ray Winstone? He's not short or fat and doesn't dress funny .. but he's a mighty fine Actor

Image

Re: vic colonna

Mon Nov 12, 2007 9:57 pm

viccolonna@gmail.com wrote:HI JUAN LUIS,

yeah, i try to listen to as much as i can, all genres. johnny pacheco got me started on salsa many years ago when i heard…

but instead let me give you a little ditty i wrote after watching "buena vista social club"


Buena Vista Social Club

That debonair Diablo Ry Cooder can be blamed for this: bringing to the public’s consciousness some sublime music that had been virtually forgotten thanks to Fidel and his thugs with the able cooperation of our own State Department. It was Ry Cooder’s “Buena Vista Social Club” album in 1997 that led to the making of this documentary (one that I had meant to watch for years and inexplicably never did) and earned him a $25,000 fine from Big Brother (Yes, Virginia, the Butthole Surfers are not just an alterna-tive band). Forgotten in one sense, perhaps, but Ned Sublette calls Cuban music “the elephant in the living room” and makes an impressive case for its significance and con-tributions to European and American music since the Spanish invaded this island paradise and its neighbors hundreds of years ago.
Indeed, the Cuban son of the late 19th century transformed itself into salsa in the 1970’s. (1) New York saw its influence throughout the 20th century in jazz, R & B (pre and post rock ‘n’ roll’s emergence), pop, and not just from the recorded music—great com-posers, the likes of Cole Porter and George Gershwin, as Timothy Brennan said, “knew a good thing” when they heard it.
The Cuban son, the popular dance music of Cuba, is African rhythms fused with European melodic styles. The members of the Buena Vista Social Club were and are extraordinary musicians as this documentary personifies. Scattered and forgotten, even in their homeland, they are now an industry and BVSC has taken on a life of its own since Ry Cooder’s Grammy–winning album and the success of this subsequent docu-mentary. The members of BVSC as corralled by Ry Cooder are Juan de Marcos Gon-zález, Ibrahim Ferrer, Rubén González, Compay Segundo, Ry Cooder, Pío Leyva, Manuel "Puntillita" Licea, Orlando "Cachaito" López, Manuel "Guajiro" Mirabal, Eliades Ochoa, Omara Portuondo, Barbarito Torres, Amadito Valdés, and Joachim Cooder.
Halfway through this film I find myself expecting more and not getting it. Maybe I just don’t get it. There is a disjointed feel. They are telling a story that needs a bit more co-hesion. The music is wonderful and “finding” Ibrahim Ferrer and describing him as a Spanish Nat “King” Cole is the best line thus far. He seems to be the best of this crew and that is probably why he batted leadoff. His story reminds me of another great musi-cian I will discuss later. This film needs a narrative; a voice–over that links the segments and peppers us with historical data that will enhance the snippets we get from the musi-cians. They all seem to have two things in common: they started life as small boys with amazing musical prowess and now they are old men who have not forgotten a thing. I am just not hearing exactly what it was like in their musical heyday and how they felt in the years they were forgotten.
It is heartwarming to see this cast of cast–offs return to the spotlight; we are treated to one delightful performance after another. Called “a bizarre band that never existed” at one point in the film, that seems an apt description. There is a decidedly happy feel to the film but I want to know more about the years of torment; the heart-break; how they survived the fall. This is a wonderful story of triumph, belated success and recognition, a tale of deserving people finally “getting their due.” From crowded bar-rios to crowds flocking to see you at Carnegie Hall—this is storybook stuff. Ry Cooder is to be commended for turning dreams into reality; he changed many lives with his project and gave back to the world something it did not even realize it was missing. I watched a couple of the performances more than once, but only because I had the DVD right in front of me. The CD and its spinoffs are more to my liking and I will fill in the gaps and answer the questions posed by what I saw with some follow–up reading. Highly recom-mended if you want to kick back and hear some great music; just don’t start thinking too much about the how and why as I did or a bit of frustration might creep in.

two footnotes to this one:

(1) That wonderful style, not the commercialized blend that supplanted it, introduced me to Johnny Pacheco and Tampica ’71. Just try and find one of their albums now. If you do you will get to hear the world’s greatest flautist, bar none.

(2) Ibrahim Ferrer’s story brought to mind a similar tale. There was a boy who arrived on these shores from England, just one year old, in 1909. He started playing the violin when he was four. It was not long before those around him realized they had a prodigy on their hands. He was compared to Yehoudi Menhuen (sp?). He practiced up to six hours a day from the time he was six. His father died when he was 15 and he was forced to quit school and go to work to support his mother and brother. He continued to play and was much in demand at weddings, other social gatherings, and often appeared on the radio locally in the 1920s. He continued to work at New Departure, a division of General Motors, and when it came time to get married in 1935 he had to choose: life as a member of the Hartford Symphony as their first violinist (many days of being away from home; travel by bus and rail) or the stability of the factory where he could go home to the woman he loved every night. The violin went into the case and into the closet. He had finished school at night and taken correspondence courses (the equivalent of college in those days) so he was a rising star at New Departure. He rose to the level of production control manager. He was the one who decided just what and how much this factory would produce: A vital task during the war years. His father, my grandfather after whom I am called Sam, was a whiz kid in his own right and designed much of the machinery that this plant used for five decades. When I was 13, having heard all about my father from my mother and aunts and uncles but never having heard him play, I finally coaxed him into going into the closet and toting out that violin. He always said, “I’m too rusty.” on the many occasions I had asked him to play. I was a little older now, learning saxophone (maybe that helped), and he finally consented. After some tuning and picking (what he explained was pizzicato), and the picking was amazing, he took a deep breath and the bow took on a life of its own. His fingers were a blur. I was mesmerized. I later learned that, after a 13–year layoff, my dad had just ripped through a flawless performance of “Flight of the Bumblebee.” ‘Nuff said.
Thanks so kool! Son is imo better than salsa and more "debonair" or whatever word I am looking for that is classy-like for dancing..and easier too! :)

Re: vic colonna

Mon Nov 12, 2007 10:40 pm

viccolonna@gmail.com wrote:viccolonna says: hello sports fans. i am back. back from the dead thanks to paul dowling who somehow tracked me down in my cave in montana where i've been holed up because i thought the feds were still after me. any questions about those records that changed the recording industry? you know, those nineteen single lps, three double lps, and the 4lp box set. they will be answered here while i work on the book that will chronicle those thrilling days of yesteryear. paul has provided me with a laptop and urged me to get in touch because he says some of you actually still care. i only ask one thing of you: if you are a fan of george bush or approve of his policies please kill yourself immediately because we do not want you infecting the gene pool. i saw enough fighting in vietnam and in various african countries during my mercenary days and for what dumbya has done he should right now be hanging from a yardarm or walking the plank to shark–infested waters below. when men were men we would have run this scoundrel out of town on a rail, tarred and feathered. enough of that, before i tell you how i really feel let's talk about the elvis records, those fun days, days when many of you could not get enough of that stuff and kept asking about our next release. yes, we had more records "in the can" when we hung up our rock 'n' roll shoes but those pesky g-men, thanks to the election of ronnie rayguns, forced us to call it a day. i see ernst has carried on the tradition quite capably. he still has some goodies for you, of that i am sure. either that or we had some things he did not. we'll have to see, and if you still have not heard "afternoon jam", what would have been our next record, a great session with elvis and the boys jamming in nbc studios one afternoon during the filming of the '68 comeback, then we will have to petition him to get that out to you all. elvis sings "young love" and "oh, happy day" and it is a treat.

vic

Hi Vic -

Thank you for brightening the lives of the Elvis fan during that dark and fallow period after his death, when RCA offered absolutely nothing of value as we struggled to makes sense of it all through our tears. Please post as often as you are able -- any and all stories welcome!

LOVE and AGREE 100% about George Bush Jr..

The June 24, 1968 "afternoon jam" was bootlegged in 1983 on Play It Hot (Laurel) -- and again in better quality on Elvis Rocks ... And The Girls Roll (Pink & Black) in 1986, and it was officially released in best-ever quality by Ernst in 2006 on Let Yourself Go (Follow That Dream/BMG)!

Ernst also released the June 25, 1968 "afternoon jam" in 1999 on Burbank 68 (Follow That Dream/BMG)!!

Re: vic colonna

Mon Nov 12, 2007 10:41 pm

IMPORTANT!! PLEASE READ!

I have decided to offer anyone who can decipher Vic's recent posts on this site (English only please!) the following UNRELEASED bootleg LP's that were due to come out in 1980 but were cancelled for obvious reasons:

1) ELVIS "LIVE" UNTAMED (1956 - 1957). Ten LP box set with 20 unreleased "live" shows from this era. With 100 page full color photo booklet.
2) THE DARBY DEVIL DUETS WITH THE KING. Totally unreleased LP recorded "live" in Darby, Pa during one of the KING's visit with his idol - Jim "E" Curtin. Contains a 50 page concert photo book with mostly unreleased blurry photos of the "Darby Devil".
3) THE ULTIMATE ELVIS SOUNDBOARD COLLECTION VOL. 1. This is a 650 LP boxed collection of 650 rare "live" soundboards from '69 - ' 77. It was not released simply because it was too heavy to ship. Comes in a huge sturdy wooden crate. Bonus photos also included!

Deadline is Friday Nov. 16, 2030.

Experts in the field of counter intelligence and Egyptian hieroglyphics have been contacted but are all baffled and cannot figure out what he has written. One informed, unnamed source said: "I've been able to decipher the oldest and most difficult caveman drawings and writings but this is impossible to understand".

PLEASE HELP!!

Re: vic colonna

Tue Nov 13, 2007 12:19 am

wwelvis wrote:IMPORTANT!! PLEASE READ!

I have decided to offer anyone who can decipher Vic's recent posts on this site (English only please!) the following UNRELEASED bootleg LP's that were due to come out in 1980 but were cancelled for obvious reasons:

1) ELVIS "LIVE" UNTAMED (1956 - 1957). Ten LP box set with 20 unreleased "live" shows from this era. With 100 page full color photo booklet.
2) THE DARBY DEVIL DUETS WITH THE KING. Totally unreleased LP recorded "live" in Darby, Pa during one of the KING's visit with his idol - Jim "E" Curtin. Contains a 50 page concert photo book with mostly unreleased blurry photos of the "Darby Devil".
3) THE ULTIMATE ELVIS SOUNDBOARD COLLECTION VOL. 1. This is a 650 LP boxed collection of 650 rare "live" soundboards from '69 - ' 77. It was not released simply because it was too heavy to ship. Comes in a huge sturdy wooden crate. Bonus photos also included!

Deadline is Friday Nov. 16, 2030.

Experts in the field of counter intelligence and Egyptian hieroglyphics have been contacted but are all baffled and cannot figure out what he has written. One informed, unnamed source said: "I've been able to decipher the oldest and most difficult caveman drawings and writings but this is impossible to understand".

PLEASE HELP!!
Stop it Paul! :lol: ..Tell the stories how you GAVE the REELS that are worth more than a 2008 Mercedes for free to xxxxx Etc....PS. Loving You sessions ring a bell? :smt006
:smt005

Re: vic colonna

Tue Nov 13, 2007 12:43 am

I will try to make this my last post on this thread.... seems like a dream..after so many years this (thread) gives credit where credit is due. ...to the good ole' United States Of America. ...

Re: vic colonna

Tue Nov 13, 2007 12:58 am

:roll: :wink: 8) keep writing Vic this is very, VERY interesting and that 'behind closed doors set' was/is TREMENDOUS!! :lol:

Re: vic colonna

Tue Nov 13, 2007 1:03 am

viccolonna@gmail.com wrote:a movie, huh? paul can only be played by johnny depp. as for vic: since he has often been described as short, fat, and his mother dresses him funny this is a real challenge. where is charlie chaplin when we need him? you decide who should play vic and when you know meet me at the corner of WALK and DON'T WALK for a cuppa joe. :mrgreen:


Not sure if you are aware Vic but most of us got to see what you looked like a while back,
Image
I see you still have retained your sense of humor :smt023

Not sure if Depp would be the right guy to play Paul, :lol: but ya never know it certainly would be a great hook for what I think would prove to be an interesting movie if ever done. It would almost play out like the movie "Blow" which ironically Depp acted in, but of course we would be talking Elvis bootleg's instead of drugs.
Image
I got to say what you two brought to the table over the early years really did keep Elvis alive for a lot of us. RCA should have really rewarded you guys in the end.

One of the most exciting things you two guys came out with in my opinion were the 68' outtakes and we are not just talking audio here but the first look at the majority of the video outtakes an just to think that was almost 30 years before EPE got around to doing it.

Those were very exciting years and it was a black day in the Elvis world when all things came to an end.

I remember seeing part of the world clashing down on the TV News where the FBI and RCMP were going through what they had picked up from their busts of 81', the way they were talking it was like it was the biggest drug bust they had ever done :roll: it was comical and sad at the same time.

Anyway glad to see you have come out of your cave after all these years, if for nothing more than for us to see that you are still a Elvis fan.

Without people such as yourself , Dowling, Ger and so many more it's hard to image what the Elvis world would have been like during those years.

Look forward to the book, lets hope someone out there in the movie business does hear about you guys and comes up with a movie offer, personally I do think it would be a cool movie if done right. as I do not think anyone has used that idea yet.

In the mean time catch up on some reading where Ger started a thread back in 06' on this forum, you might find some of the things said interesting reading.
viewtopic.php?f=1&t=22741&start=0&st=0&sk=t&sd=a

An for some of the members who want to get to know Mr Dowling a little better here is his website.
http://www.worldwideelvis.com/WWEMAINNEW_.SHTML

PEP 8)

Re: vic colonna

Tue Nov 13, 2007 1:24 am

YDKM wrote::roll: :wink: 8) keep writing Vic this is very, VERY interesting and that 'behind closed doors set' was/is TREMENDOUS!! :lol:

Amen

Re: vic colonna

Tue Nov 13, 2007 1:45 am

Thanks for the Links PEP. What a fascinating article.

Thanks for everything .. both of you.

Re: vic colonna

Tue Nov 13, 2007 3:14 am

viccolonna@gmail.com wrote:viccolonna says: hello sports fans. i am back. back from the dead thanks to paul dowling who somehow tracked me down in my cave in montana where i've been holed up because i thought the feds were still after me. any questions about those records that changed the recording industry? you know, those nineteen single lps, three double lps, and the 4lp box set. they will be answered here while i work on the book that will chronicle those thrilling days of yesteryear. paul has provided me with a laptop and urged me to get in touch because he says some of you actually still care. i only ask one thing of you: if you are a fan of george bush or approve of his policies please kill yourself immediately because we do not want you infecting the gene pool. i saw enough fighting in vietnam and in various african countries during my mercenary days and for what dumbya has done he should right now be hanging from a yardarm or walking the plank to shark–infested waters below. when men were men we would have run this scoundrel out of town on a rail, tarred and feathered. enough of that, before i tell you how i really feel let's talk about the elvis records, those fun days, days when many of you could not get enough of that stuff and kept asking about our next release. yes, we had more records "in the can" when we hung up our rock 'n' roll shoes but those pesky g-men, thanks to the election of ronnie rayguns, forced us to call it a day. i see ernst has carried on the tradition quite capably. he still has some goodies for you, of that i am sure. either that or we had some things he did not. we'll have to see, and if you still have not heard "afternoon jam", what would have been our next record, a great session with elvis and the boys jamming in nbc studios one afternoon during the filming of the '68 comeback, then we will have to petition him to get that out to you all. elvis sings "young love" and "oh, happy day" and it is a treat.

vic


Nice to meet you Vic! Image

Re: vic colonna

Tue Nov 13, 2007 8:07 am

Nice to meet you Vic, welcome aboard!

Re: vic colonna

Tue Nov 13, 2007 8:46 am

Welcome to the mad house, Vic.

I really enjoyed reading your history of metal and rock. Brilliant writing. Lots of sneaky wordplay. And very, very concise. Then again, I don't know too much. I ain't even a metal fan, but I do dig Metallica. I was so pissed during "Live Earth" when the BBC cut their live set short -- God bless the Internet!

Re: vic colonna

Thu Nov 22, 2007 11:19 pm

"hey patrick petersen: you still have the flyers? i sure don't, took it all to the dump when the feds were hot on our tail. i'd like to get copies of them. have queried many but everyone seems to have thrown them away. email me viccolonna@gmail.com please."

I will be up in the attic tommorow bringing down the Christmas decorations. I will then hunt for some of those catalogs and fliers. Maybe I'll put a few jpegs up on this thread(with PEP's help?)

Re: vic colonna

Sat Nov 24, 2007 6:21 am

Going through some stuff in the attic and ran across a 45 page catalog sent to me by Victor Semmel back in the day and these pages were in there.
Also have some of the original flyers somewhere and will post them if I run across them.
Incidentally the 45 page Semmel flyer is available. If someone wants it make me an offer by Pm.
Enjoy the scans
Greybeard

Image
Image
Image
Image

Re: vic colonna

Sat Nov 24, 2007 10:47 am

Here are a few pages I posted on the other thread "Those Dam Bootlegs"

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

PEP 8)

Re: vic colonna

Sat Nov 24, 2007 1:44 pm

thank you for posting the Flyer's i am loving reading this thread and getting all the info about what was going on in them days, i wasn't there(i wasn't born until 1991) so i didn't get to see all these great LP's(only some of the cheap CD releases that copied 'em :twisted: ) and i would love to be able to buy 1 or 2 of these releases but i am guessing that they will be really rare nowadays and pretty expensive :(
i would have loved to be there during the 70's/80's/early 90's 'cos when i listen to the stories i get the feeling that it was exciting getting all the bootlegs and searching everywhere for them, i think where too spoiled now, who's gonna complain tho(everyone it seams :lol: )
thanks for the great reading :smt006

Re: vic colonna

Sun Nov 25, 2007 7:02 pm

Vic,
Great to have you on the board. I love your stories. One thing I have been curious about is the "Got a Lot o' Livin' To Do" LP, which was put out on the Pirate label. Did you put that one out? And, if so,was there anymore audio from the August 31, 1957 Vacouver show? Small samples were included on that LP. I sure hope so. Thanks - Mike C

Re: vic colonna

Mon Nov 26, 2007 3:51 am

Man, ........ those were the days .......... INDEED!!

Great thread, all!!

Ahhhh, The MEMORIES!

I still have all my original vinyl bootlegs. They were the only EP products worth buying back in those days.

-------------------------

Always appreciate the times ....... (on that note) .....

FTD has spoiled us all for good .......... and we should all be grateful, for it will never be this good again - ever.


N8
... just a fan ....

Re: vic colonna

Mon Nov 26, 2007 11:30 pm

Greybeard and PEP -- thanks for the scans! Those were indeed the only Elvis LPs worth buying between 1977 and 1979. RCA offered the fans garbage by comparison.

Mike C wrote:One thing I have been curious about is the "Got a Lot o' Livin' To Do" LP, which was put out on the Pirate label. Did you put that one out? And, if so,was there anymore audio from the August 31, 1957 Vacouver show? Small samples were included on that LP.

A full release of this recording was promised in the near future according to the album's sleeve notes, but it's been over 30 years and ... nothing.

Re: vic colonna

Mon Nov 26, 2007 11:52 pm

Which songs were included from the Vancouver show?
These are different from the Toronto snippets that have popped up??

Re: vic colonna

Mon Nov 26, 2007 11:53 pm

It is also interesting to note that many of the original boots advertised other boots on the inner sleeve, just like RCA at the time did. That was a nice touch.