In this section you can submit questions to people that knew Elvis, or to other important people in the Elvis World.

Re: vic colonna

Sun Nov 11, 2007 5:06 pm

Vic,
I was a big customer of yours in the late seventies/early eighties. I must have bought 20 or 30 boots from you. It was so easy back then to get this stuff. I remember suppliers like king creole, wwelvis, elvis specialties etc. Even independent record stores were selling Boots!! I guess we need to get Ace Anderson on here too. I'm sure he has a story to tell. His was the most prevalent name to come up when the FBI went after the Elvis' bootlegers. My favorite boot of all time was the "Behind Closed Doors" box set. That was incredible. How did you get all that material back in 1979? Can you give us a little story about putting that one together? I still have flyers and some very elaborate price guides you guys created to sell the boots. Maybe I'll put a few photos of them here if you don't mind.

Re: vic colonna

Sun Nov 11, 2007 5:23 pm

ELVIS SPECIALTIES is a name that I came up with back in the late 70's. When Arse Anderson decided to be a snitch and turn in all the bootleggers at that time to the FBI he also took that name and used it. Since I had not copyrighted it I had no legal rights. Arse sure does have a tale to tell! It's full of total complete lies as is everything he has ever said about himself, his association with Elvis (he never met him) and all the other artists he claims to have known. His name should ONLY be mentioned in the ELvis bootleg history as someone who always wanted to be "MR IMPORTANCE" but never even came close except in his own mind.

Re: vic colonna

Sun Nov 11, 2007 6:00 pm

E-Cat wrote:thx JL
Thank you too! Nothing but respect for you.

Re: vic colonna

Sun Nov 11, 2007 6:19 pm

Juan Luis wrote:
E-Cat wrote:
I edited out. You could do the same if you want. Sorry if I misinterpreted.

thx JL - también me siento - I even deleted my comments which caused the confusion.

Juan Luis wrote:
E-Cat wrote:thx JL
Thank you too! Nothing but respect for you.

dito here: seems that we must have a beer together soon :D

wwelvis wrote:ELVIS SPECIALTIES is a name that I came up with back in the late 70's. When Arse Anderson decided to be a snitch and turn in all the bootleggers at that time to the FBI he also took that name and used it. Since I had not copyrighted it I had no legal rights. Arse sure does have a tale to tell! It's full of total complete lies as is everything he has ever said about himself, his association with Elvis (he never met him) and all the other artists he claims to have known. His name should ONLY be mentioned in the ELvis bootleg history as someone who always wanted to be "MR IMPORTANCE" but never even came close except in his own mind.

Ace's testimony was low indeed. I looked at his website and see that he's not too far from your office; : after all these yrs, you never discussed this matter in private ?
KUTGW!

Re: vic colonna

Sun Nov 11, 2007 8:32 pm

Unfortunately Arse lives in Florida although I don't care where as I haven't spoken to this traitor since I think early 1982 and never intend to. By being my "friend" he not only turned me, Vic, Richard Minor, Victor Semmel, Ron D'Ambra, and many others in but he stole THOUSANDS of records (RCA and boots) from me. The good news is that hardly anyone in our Elvis world has ever heard of him today but, if anyone has, let me caution you that he is definitely NOT to be trusted and is more than likely still working for the FBI turning people in. Want proof? Find his "website" and you'll see all the boots that Vic and I did and also that Richard did and he proudly and boldly is advertising them STILL. Can anyone believe he could be so blantantly advertising these without getting the OK from the Feds??? It's actually hilarious to read "MY BIO"! It makes Jim Curtin's recent hallucinations seem normal.

Re: vic colonna

Sun Nov 11, 2007 8:50 pm

Steady on fellas, the FBI aren't that dumb. They are not going to do you for things you are innocent of even if the "arse" fella says you are guilty. The FBI will require some degree of proof in all this, surely.

Re: vic colonna

Sun Nov 11, 2007 10:09 pm

Hello all,

some interesting questions, much of which will be covered in the book. the book will take you from that fateful day in 1975 when, showing off 8-month old patrick back east, i went up in the attic of the house i grew up in and, while rummaging, came across a horde of elvis eps and 45s. i brought them back to CA with me and made the bold decision to go where no man had gone before. i was going to collect all the elvis records i had as a kid––and i had them all. or so i thought. as it turned out one or two other folks had the same idea.

"i beg of you"? great story. that chapter of the book is up soon and, not to be a tease, but if i answer all the questions i might as well just post the book here. i'll do that eventually for anyone who can't afford a copy, but first let me get the durn thing finished and try and make a pfinig, two scheckels, and three mugwumps so i can buy my granddaughter more cds and my grandson more cars (little ones).

so dowling thinks he's THE beach boys fan, eh? thing about that handsome devil is that he has limited himself to elvis, the beach boys, and little else. i forgot more about the beach boys than he'll ever know. he'll never read this so i can trash him as much as i want. wait, there's someone at the door…

in the hospital now, bruno and vito just whomped the bejesus out of me. paul sent them. he sure is a fast worker. as i lie here in traction let me continue: music, where would i be without it? ella, elvis, and everyone else. have always stayed current. elvis is tops, the one to whom i always return, no voice ever haunted like that, but i like it all. the groups i like right now, and i highly recommend these, are mohair, the mother hips, art brut, the ark, the nice boys, pink martini, architecture in helsinki, and the john butler trio. plus a few hundre others. if you like to experiment and have a favorite genre or two, i'll be glad to suggest some music that should delight you. i've written a thing or two about music over the years and, although it's not just elvis, perhaps you'll find a line or two of interest. posted below are my "revolution paper" in which i picked a point in rock history where a justifiable revolution occurred (elvis was off limits, too obvious) and my heavy metal 101 primer, part one, that i sent to gregg, lisa's husband. part two went on about metallica, his gods, and more about NWOBHM. before we go there just let me say, it may not get any better than elvis, but there sure is an incredible amount of great music out there. i try to sample it all. world music is where i've been the last few years: african, middle eastern, far east, latin, american indian, kaubuki and noh theater, gypsy, and much more. awesome sounds, interesting instruments, and while some of it takes some getting used to it is certainly worth the time and effort. if the fania all stars don't make you get up and dance then you are already dead. in this modern world, where a whisper today is above the fold tomorrow, music from other cultures has cropped up everywhere in rock and will continue to do so. at the same time, rock has influenced music around the world. sure would have been fun to see elvis teamed with ali farka toure, taraf de haidouks, santana, and the like. that would have happened, inevitable. keep those elvis records on top of the pile, that's where you go when you want to be mesmerized, but do get out and explore, there's a world of music waiting…

Heavy Metal 101

In the rock era there is no music more misunderstood than HM (heavy metal). For most of its existence, HM has existed with its audience in a largely self–contained world. Its main outlets have been concert performances and recordings. Metal has received relatively little airplay, especially on mainstream recordings.
For many years HM’s audience was almost exclusively young males, typically disaffected and from middle– or lower–class environments. Immersion in HM has been a rite of passage for many teens around the world. More recently the audience has broadened to include older males—the ones who grew up with it—and females.
Some confusion exists regarding the source of the term HM as it applies to rock: all agree that the term appeared in rock as part of the lyric (“heavy metal thunder”) in Steppenwolf’s 1968 hit, “Born to Be Wild.” Its history prior to that is unclear. Be that as it may, the term was in common use by the early seventies.
Metal’s sound signature is distortion—extreme distortion. It also has other, widely used, musical conventions.
‘70s Metal Characteristics
1. Blues–derived pentatonic and modal scales (Pentatonic = 5 notes per octave. There are two forms used widely in pop music: Anglo–American is heard in minstrel songs [Stephen Foster’s “Oh! Susannah”] and some country; African–American is heard in blues and blues–influenced songs.) {Modal = A particular form of a scale distinguished by the pattern of large and small intervals within the scale. In rock, modals have been a popular alternative to major or pentatonic scales since the mid–‘60s.}
2. Distortion
3. Riff–based, under the verse
4. Palm muted strumming
5. Power chords (Octave, 5th, Root)
6. Multi–sectional form
7. Dropped tuning (loosen strings, pitch drops)
8. Power trio: guitar, bass, drum (no rhythm guitar because of distortion and tuning; rhythm guitar would turn sound muddy)
9. Extended, flamboyant solos
10. Ear–splitting volume
11. Screamed–out lyrics’
12. Pounding rhythm at breakneck speed
13. Duple subdivision of the beat
14. Hint of classical influences
HM has its roots in blues, especially electric blues (Blues–based rock split into HM and Glam Rock). The reliance on riffs goes back to Robert Johnson; power chords and endlessly repeated riffs go back to John Lee Hooker. The blues influence is also indirect: Early Kinks (“You Really Got Me”) as well as Hendrix, Clapton, etc. Classical music is also a source of inspiration for HM—from it was borrowed the idea of virtuosity.
Modality is the seminal influence. Modes formed scales of much of the English folksongs. Modes are the basis of fresh, new harmonic language in rock (Beatles, Stones, et al). The African–American pentatonic scales map onto most modes. Modes, because they are the basis of folksong, medieval and renaissance classical music connote archaic, mythical times when meshed smoothly with the Gothic element in HM.
Black Sabbath gives us the beginning of HM. The opening three notes of “Black Sabbath” are a mutation of the power chord called a tri–tone. This conveys an evil–sounding interval known as “Diablos en Musica.” Black Sabbath are the tradition bearers of HM. Led Zeppelin the innovators. Zep brings in world music and British folk along with new instruments from the Middle East and India and the theremin (an early synthsizer) along with meter changes in the multi–sectional songs.
‘80s Metal Characteristics
1. Extreme distortion almost to the point of white noise.
2. Power trio plus one (often dual lead).
3. No synthesizers (except Van Halen).
4. Non–melodic music (growling, screaming).
5. Predominately instrumental.
6. Unconventional harmony.
7. Patterns (Like 1, 4, 5, 1) ignored.
8. Unusual changes between chords.
9. Very virtuostic players (Intricate solos at blinding speed).
10. Multi–sectional song form (Sabbath was slow and fast)—by the ‘80s several different big blocks of sound in the same song.
And this brings us to the new wave of British HM [NWOBHM] (Iron Maiden, Def Leppard, Motorhead, AC/DC). And so it goes…

then i wrote him about metallica (quite a radical departure from elvis but those angry boys had lots to say and it is part of our culture and history now. they cannot be ignored.), rush, van halen, judas priest, scorpions, and all those '80s HM groups. i've grown a bit tired of HM, but it does wake you up. wolfmother seems to be one of the current faves, along with HIM, queens of the stone age, foo fighters, and the beat goes on…





REVOLUTION PAPER
(Available on vinyl in 33 1/3, 45, or 78 rpm formats and on Enhanced Video CD)

You Say You Want a What?

The baby called “rock ‘n’ roll” entered adolescence in fine fettle. From a popularized melding of R&B, gospel, and varied blues and country styles it had taken on a life of its own, survived in spite of the best efforts of the establishment to make it go away, and began to define itself thanks to pioneering minds such as Chuck Berry, Bo Diddley, Buddy Holly, Little Richard, and a handful of others that leapt across thresholds while others tiptoed to the edge and hesitated. Cover songs did not go away, and never will, but as the era lengthened we saw rockers covering and sometimes even improving on what their peers had done (Pattie LaBelle and the Bluebells “I Sold My Heart to the Junkman”; The Olympics “Dance By the Light of the Moon”; The Marcels “Blue Moon”; Elvis Presley “I Feel So Bad”; The Animals “House of the Rising Sun”). The new music was still infested with syrupy renderings by imposters whose time had gone, but creative, young minds set to work and an outpouring of novelty songs, silly love songs (what’s wrong with that?), and tunes that set toes a–tappin’ and bodies whirling filled the airwaves. Elvis assumed the mantle of leadership thanks to a voice with the power to enthrall; he too relied on covers to jump–start his career, continued to lend his magic touch to songs of others even during the years when songwriters would have killed to get him to record their work, and in his final years, spent touring extensively, his act consisted of covering his own early hits interspersed with singular interpretations of what had become standards (in the majority of cases, Elvis’ version equaled or surpassed the original—one notable exception being “I Can’t Stop Loving You” which will always belong to Ray Charles [but Elvis did a credible job]). Those first years of rock ‘n’ roll had commonality in three ways: strong beat, simple words, and an infectiously happy mood. Regional TV shows cashed in on the teen dancing craze (nothing new in itself, teens have always flocked to dance halls) associated with the new style and quickly went national with American Bandstand (which, in turn, spawned a legion of local imitators such as Jerry Blavatt and paved the way for Soul Train, the undisputed hasn’t–lost–a–step longevity leader [started locally in ‘Chicago and went national in 1971 with Gladys Knight and the Pips their first guest {“Midnight Train to Georgia”}]). A period of economic prosperity and freedom followed years of World War and deprivation; teenagers gained status and represented a new demographic with their purchasing power. New technologies accompanied this change, notably the unbreakable 45rpm record and portable players that enabled teenagers and their music to congregate, with their music, at times and places of their choosing. That, combined with an age–old longing to separate themselves from previous generations was instrumental in rock ‘n’ roll’s continued popularity. Imaginative and daring minds—the best–known represented by Dylan, The Beach Boys, The Beatles, and The Rolling Stones—were poised and prepared to steer the child into maturity.
Partly fueled by Dylan’s transition to “rock” but primarily a response to the times, those that had changed so drastically from the somnolent 50s, rock lyrics grew up between 1965 and 1970. No longer were protest songs solely the province of folk tunes—words with a bite began to be backed by music with drive. These were no longer songs the masses could chorus together—they could, of course, but they would be hard–pressed to match the energy of the instruments; the vocals of the Fogerty brothers (“Fortunate Son” & “Bad Moon Rising”); the harmony of CSN&Y (“Ohio”); the raw blues of Canned Heat (“Let’s Work Together”); the intensity of Donovan (Buffy St. Marie’s “The Universal Soldier”); the lush arrangements that fleshed out the feelings of the words (Jefferson Airplane (“Up Against the Wall”); the passion–filled entreaty of Janis Joplin (“Try” “Down on Me” and even “Me and Bobby McGee” spoke to the era); or even the rich melodies of Jesse Colin Young (but we all sang “Get Together” and didn’t sound half–bad). Even Elvis, still “king” after all these years, joined the fray (“In the Ghetto” & “If I Can Dream”). The music change in lyric content was an outgrowth of innovation and experimentation, with The Beach Boys and The Beatles leading the charge, that transformed rock ‘n’ roll into rock and birthed songs and albums that were studio creations meant for listening rather than dancing and often incapable of being performed live. The Vietnam War, the Civil Rights Movement, and a general establishment backlash provided the perfect backdrop for songs that no longer chanted about self–assertion, self–pity, and love gone right or wrong. Those who had experienced the beginnings of rock ‘n’ roll were now the writers and performers and they had grown alongside the phenomenon, matured just as it did, and were now ready to lend their own voice rather than depend on pap churned out by a generation that could not wholly understand the times or assimilate the pathos and ethos of the music makers (Not that it was all pap or all bad: Leiber and Stoller, Pomus and Schuman, and young writers like Paul Anka and Bobby Darin contributed mightily to the pantheon of early rock ‘n’ roll songs that have everlasting appeal.) They spoke mightily. From the folk–rock of the Buffalo Springfield (“For What It’s Worth”); the pounding plea of Edwin Starr (“War”); every soldier’s lament echoed by Peter, Paul & Mary (“Leaving on a Jet Plane”); the in–your–face anthem of Country Joe & The Fish (“I Feel Like I’m Fixin’ to Die Rag”); the plea of larger–than–life icon John Lennon with his Plastic Ono Band (“Give Peace a Chance”); and the painful phrasing of futility from The Doors (“The Unknown Soldier”), rock was no longer just feel–good music but acerbic condemnations of War, police brutality, and the Selective Service; commentary on social reform and conformity; criticism of the Justice System; and treatises on the inhumanity of mankind and hypocrisy. Phew. Quite a bit to swallow; let alone digest. Rock masterfully and majestically echoed the sentiments of the times and the new complexity of the genre dovetailed perfectly with and mimicked the uncertainty of the era.
Rock matured into a mighty, mighty man that not even “soft rock” could harness. Be it hard rock or metal, punk or alternative, glam or slam, the music has spoken to the world like nothing this powerful ever did. Globally appealing, globally–influenced, and with a message that is now global in scope, rock has become a voice that often rivals the press, pushes past the pulpit, and penetrates the mind of every little crook and nanny. The factors that combined were age–old with a new twist: youth mattered more than ever before; technology was in lockstep with the new attitude (the changes in recording technology made virtually anything possible—experimentation produced remarkable works); the new breed of future leaders and followers refused to let go when they melded into the mainstream (previous phases and crazes were just that—the 20s jump and jive; the crooning of the 30s and 40s; swing and big band had seen better days; jazz retreated to a niche position, unable to sustain its initial thrust); and all of this because rock ‘n’ roll was not really anything new but simply a fusion of the best of the best that liberally borrowed what it needed from every genre that preceded it and sprinkled in new elements to give it a distinctive flavor and appeal.
Once those raised on rock became the leaders, creators, and guiding force the locomotive that had us doing “The Locomotion” and “The Twist” (regular or “Peppermint”) became a bullet–train that traveled at light–speed from Katmandu to Kingston to Knoxville to The Klondike in a matter of days if the music/message had enough appeal, and often it did. The singer–songwriter, once a rarity, interloper, and non–conformist, was now the undisputed chairman–of–the–board and conquered the world like Alexander and the Ottomans could never have imagined. Sophistication came about naturally as singers and writers became aware of the noise, violence, and excitement of city–life and put their feelings on record. By the close of the '60s pop and rock had done a compete 180º; the performers and their contemporaries had gone to elementary school with Bill Haley and Buddy Holly; passed into Junior High with Chuck Berry and Bo Diddley; grew through High School while the new music organized itself and experimented; then went to college with Bob Dylan. Just as “Blackboard Jungle” heralded the beginnings of rock ‘n’ roll, “Easy Rider” symbolized the new generation gap along with a soundtrack to emphasize the point. The trend has continued and rock knows no bounds: David Bowie and Elton John gave us their take on NASA (“Space Oddity” & “Rocket Man”); Joni Mitchell a bleak commentary on civilization’s charge toward extinction (“Big Yellow Taxi”); Don Henley on the failure of society and a satire on the mass–media (“Johnny Can’t Read” & “Nightly News”); U2 on the struggles of a nation to win independence (“Sunday, Bloody Sunday”); Good Charlotte’s youth anthem asserting independence (“I Don’t Want to Be Like You”); and the anti–war songs of today by Sleater-Kinney ("Combat Rock" & "Entertain"); the Decemberists' ("Sixteen Military Wives"); Metric ("Monster Hospital" and "Succexxy"); Le Tigre ("New Kicks" [didactic but not without charm]); Neil Young’s latest album (“Living with War”), a biting commentary on all that is wrong with Washington (“Let’s Impeach the President” is, sadly, what will not happen); and a list that would fill hundreds of pages without a silly love song. There is nothing wrong with that. Now what we need is a song that will address “The Widening of America” and cause the behemoths that take up two zip codes to slim down. There’s a revolution for you.

'NUFF SAID. enjoy the music. i'll be back as often as i can and the book will be ready by june. an advanced creative writing class i am taking next semester will provide weekly criticism and i'll polish the rough edges, fill in a blank or two, and do my best to make it an enjoyable read. paul will make sure i get it all right and glen johnson, longtime friend and editor extraordinaire, will be unmerciful in demanding that we make it as good as it can get.

vic

Re: vic colonna

Sun Nov 11, 2007 10:38 pm

viccolonna@gmail.com wrote:'NUFF SAID. enjoy the music. i'll be back as often as i can and the book will be ready by june. an advanced creative writing class i am taking next semester will provide weekly criticism and i'll polish the rough edges, fill in a blank or two, and do my best to make it an enjoyable read. paul will make sure i get it all right and glen johnson, longtime friend and editor extraordinaire, will be unmerciful in demanding that we make it as good as it can get. vic

great stuff- can't wait to read the book !
wwelvis - since I assume this release will be a limited edition, will you consider a hardcover edition ?

Re: vic colonna

Sun Nov 11, 2007 10:48 pm

Fascinating post. Roll on June.

Re: vic colonna

Sun Nov 11, 2007 11:16 pm

hey patrick petersen: you still have the flyers? i sure don't, took it all to the dump when the feds were hot on our tail. i'd like to get copies of them. have queried many but everyone seems to have thrown them away. email me viccolonna@gmail.com please.

Re: vic colonna

Sun Nov 11, 2007 11:42 pm

the book: senor dowling has an agent and publisher and it is his shoulders the responsibility lies for getting it published. if he fails i will lock him in a room and play barry manilow 24/7 at 125dB.

authorship will be joint, i'll do the bulk of the writing and if paul finishes his remedial reading writing class at the local high school (this is his fifth attempt) he'll chip in a word or two. we're all pulling for him, i even sent my dick and jane books to help him along.

it turns out i have a decent memory and there is little that i do not recall from those days. why not? they were certainly the best years of my life. in those years my children were born, i happened to be lucky enough to be married to a wonderful girl, and the records were rewarding and fulfilling. as i said to paul, we left a legacy, can't ask for more than that.

as for legacies: angelo colonna, was an italian immigrant who came to the u.s. in the early '30s with a second grade education. a knack for inventing had he, and he designed and patented virtually all of the kitchen and bathroom stainless steel fixtures used on trains and then planes in the '30s and '40s. he wound up with a factory that encompassed an entire block in philadelphia. his greatest achievement, however, is that he was the first to successfully come up with a means to freeze–dry blood plasma. he sold the patent to smith, kline & french. that invention is credited with saving hundreds of thousands of lives in WWII. that's a legacy!

so now and then i get whimsical. i even composed a rap song. i be fly and i got game. the subject, naturally, is love. love gone wrong. where would we be without it? i shall audition it this christmas at a family gathering. kindly stay tuned. and you thought this was all going to be about elvis? nah, there are 8,000,000 stories in the naked city, 8,000,000 ways to die, and 8,000,000 songs floating around in my head from which i constantly pilfer lines and titles and reminisce.

Vicki—It’s a Wrap

Just one look and I was smitten
Oh how I loved to call her kitten
At least until the fur began to fly. Oh my, said I

Well I loved her so I thought my heart would burst,
But she mistook me for the worst.
And I treated her so fine. Yes I did. All the time. You know I did.

I remember and I ain’t fibbin’,
I bought her a car with a bright red ribbon.
That topped it off with a bow. Don’t you know. Yeah, that’s so.

Trouble was she didn’t love me,
She didn’t push she just plain shoved me.
Out the door, said no more, I was sore.

Then I looked at my glass saw it was half full,
Reached for my bootstraps and I gave a pull,
And I knew that I would last until,
She was gone completely from my mind.

That day came but it took a while.
I found that I was still in style.
The girls all looked at me with a smile, and said,
We missed you, welcome back, come sit here.

I knew that I was no spring chicken,
But I felt my pulse begin to quicken,
For from all those girls I could have my pick ‘n’,
Va–va–voom, I love girls, bless you girls.

Just a couple more things I’d like to tell ya.
Some crazy nights I think I can still smell ya,
But the mind plays tricks and I say, “Oh well ya
Can’t explain, it’s insane, here comes the rain.”

One more thing just to be fair,
I lost my teeth and I lost my hair.
But I’ve got my wit and a razor–sharp mind,
And I’ve withstood the test of time.
I’m still the best thing money can’t buy,
Got bit once though, so I might be shy.
Goodbye.

okay, 50-cent and kayne west need not worry, but i have fun. don't get me started or i'll flood these pages with blasts from the past. and hello to the birdie from england who stood me up in denver after i sallied forth at 2a.m. with great expectations. thought i forgot, huh?

vic

Re: vic colonna

Mon Nov 12, 2007 1:14 am

"Steady on fellas, the FBI aren't that dumb. They are not going to do you for things you are innocent of even if the "arse" fella says you are guilty. The FBI will require some degree of proof in all this, surely."

STEVE M:


No kidding .....but what world are you living in Steve M???

Don't know if you were around in those days (late 70's) but what Vic and I were doing was not exactly a secret and most everyone in the know in the Elvis world then knew who was behind these releases. What Arse A did was to try and act like "MR IMPORTANCE" and realized that working for the other side paid pretty well even if the absurd stories he made up were in fact ABSURD and downright lies. LUCKILY for us the FBI could separate fact from fiction.

One of the main problems that I had with this traitor is that he pretended to be a "friend" but behind my back was squeeling like a pig with concocted, fictional stories that, if believed and of course IF it could have been proven, would have really gotten us into some serious trouble. Have you ever had a "friend" lie to people about you? It's not fun especially when that "friend" is jealous and makes up the most outlandish stories about you.

I really have no desire to give this low life scum bag anymore time on this board. My advice to anyone who knows him is to stay away as far as you can. He's a sick person and should be avoided like a disease!

Re: vic colonna

Mon Nov 12, 2007 2:08 am

viccolonna@gmail.com wrote:the book: senor dowling has an agent and publisher and it is his shoulders the responsibility lies for getting it published. if he fails i will lock him in a room and play barry manilow 24/7 at 125dB.

authorship will be joint, i'll do the bulk of the writing and if paul finishes his remedial reading writing class at the local high school (this is his fifth attempt) he'll chip in a word or two. we're all pulling for him, i even sent my dick and jane books to help him along.

it turns out i have a decent memory and there is little that i do not recall from those days. why not? they were certainly the best years of my life. in those years my children were born, i happened to be lucky enough to be married to a wonderful girl, and the records were rewarding and fulfilling. as i said to paul, we left a legacy, can't ask for more than that.

as for legacies: angelo colonna, was an italian immigrant who came to the u.s. in the early '30s with a second grade education. a knack for inventing had he, and he designed and patented virtually all of the kitchen and bathroom stainless steel fixtures used on trains and then planes in the '30s and '40s. he wound up with a factory that encompassed an entire block in philadelphia. his greatest achievement, however, is that he was the first to successfully come up with a means to freeze–dry blood plasma. he sold the patent to smith, kline & french. that invention is credited with saving hundreds of thousands of lives in WWII. that's a legacy!

so now and then i get whimsical. i even composed a rap song. i be fly and i got game. the subject, naturally, is love. love gone wrong. where would we be without it? i shall audition it this christmas at a family gathering. kindly stay tuned. and you thought this was all going to be about elvis? nah, there are 8,000,000 stories in the naked city, 8,000,000 ways to die, and 8,000,000 songs floating around in my head from which i constantly pilfer lines and titles and reminisce.

Vicki—It’s a Wrap

Just one look and I was smitten
Oh how I loved to call her kitten
At least until the fur began to fly. Oh my, said I

Well I loved her so I thought my heart would burst,
But she mistook me for the worst.
And I treated her so fine. Yes I did. All the time. You know I did.

I remember and I ain’t fibbin’,
I bought her a car with a bright red ribbon.
That topped it off with a bow. Don’t you know. Yeah, that’s so.

Trouble was she didn’t love me,
She didn’t push she just plain shoved me.
Out the door, said no more, I was sore.

Then I looked at my glass saw it was half full,
Reached for my bootstraps and I gave a pull,
And I knew that I would last until,
She was gone completely from my mind.

That day came but it took a while.
I found that I was still in style.
The girls all looked at me with a smile, and said,
We missed you, welcome back, come sit here.

I knew that I was no spring chicken,
But I felt my pulse begin to quicken,
For from all those girls I could have my pick ‘n’,
Va–va–voom, I love girls, bless you girls.

Just a couple more things I’d like to tell ya.
Some crazy nights I think I can still smell ya,
But the mind plays tricks and I say, “Oh well ya
Can’t explain, it’s insane, here comes the rain.”

One more thing just to be fair,
I lost my teeth and I lost my hair.
But I’ve got my wit and a razor–sharp mind,
And I’ve withstood the test of time.
I’m still the best thing money can’t buy,
Got bit once though, so I might be shy.
Goodbye.

okay, 50-cent and kayne west need not worry, but i have fun. don't get me started or i'll flood these pages with blasts from the past. and hello to the birdie from england who stood me up in denver after i sallied forth at 2a.m. with great expectations. thought i forgot, huh?

vic



Way to Go lol!!

Image

This is turning into a fascinting thread .. FBI :shock: this should be made into a Film. More please!!

(btw .. who would you like to play you if it was turned into a film?)

Re: vic colonna

Mon Nov 12, 2007 2:34 am

wwelvis wrote: LUCKILY for us the FBI could separate fact from fiction.

When you brought the case to Supreme Court did your partners (co-defendants) support you...?

Re: vic colonna

Mon Nov 12, 2007 3:07 am

Wow! :shock: Holy **** I can't wait to get that book... just from reading what's on this thread! lol :D I liked the part about George Bush... that just made me laugh! :lol:

JEFF d
EP fan

Re: vic colonna

Mon Nov 12, 2007 6:48 am

E-Cat wrote: Thank you too! Nothing but respect for you.

dito here: seems that we must have a beer together soon :D
[/quote] Yes..have not had a drink in years and will gladly make an exception or two! :)

Re: vic colonna

Mon Nov 12, 2007 6:57 am

Hey Paul Vic is wilder than you told me. In a great,good way!! Btw..vic? Fania= Willie Colon, Ruben Blades....you KNOW your music! KOOL!!! :smt006 PS. Paul..haven't callled you cause I am waiting for THE MOMENT!!!Love ya!~!

Re: vic colonna

Mon Nov 12, 2007 7:17 am

Juan

I agree! He's a crazy one that's for sure but we love him.

By the way, I'm thinking about who should play me in the movie. Any ideas?

And who will pay..."THE MYSTERY MAN"??

And what about the "BLACK FOREST"???

Stay tuned for more scoops!

Afternoon is the best time to call.

VIC RULES!!

PS Someone asked who was supportive during those crazy legal years (25 + years ago)!! Well, Vic was of course. Arse A wasn't obviously as he switched sides real quick like a good little pussy.

Re: vic colonna

Mon Nov 12, 2007 7:44 am

I could play the Mystery Man...although STILL too good looking for that role!! Btw.I can also pay him!! :) But after me you are the best looker! :) Ps..as to black forest..still searching( if you tell I will disinherit you) to no avail!! But will not lose hope!! :lol:

Re: vic colonna

Mon Nov 12, 2007 7:59 am

But who will play you?

Re: vic colonna

Mon Nov 12, 2007 8:03 am

wwelvis wrote:But who will play you?
You !! :) without lifts!!

Re: vic colonna

Mon Nov 12, 2007 8:11 am

Juan

Don't you ever go to bed? What time is it there??

THE MYSTERY MAN!

Re: vic colonna

Mon Nov 12, 2007 8:15 am

wwelvis wrote:Juan

Don't you ever go to bed? What time is it there??

THE MYSTERY MAN!
An hour later than where you are! :) don't forget how I insisted on you finding tapes at your mom's (RIP) before you sold it and Mr.Aloha etc....PS. You know I have been a vampire all my life! :)

Re: vic colonna

Mon Nov 12, 2007 8:18 am

You are so so right! But I hope and pray that what I left there was just a duplicate of what we have!!

How old are your kids now?

Time to get some sleep and dream about the black forest, still my favorite of all!!!

E mail me at my normal e mail address and send a pic of you and the family!

No paw hawing tonight, ok!!

Re: vic colonna

Mon Nov 12, 2007 8:46 am

wwelvis wrote:You are so so right! But I hope and pray that what I left there was just a duplicate of what we have!!

How old are your kids now?

Time to get some sleep and dream about the black forest, still my favorite of all!!!

E mail me at my normal e mail address and send a pic of you and the family!

No paw hawing tonight, ok!!
You still manage to embarass my ass! LOL!! 20,17,15, and the tender age of 7...later gator and too late for pa haw warning!! :smt006 :lol: Ps. Regards to your beautiful niece!!! Btw...You know I am kidding.....NOT!!! :lol: :smt007 Yes..folks kidding....PAUL DOWLING..as important as ERNST<GER INTHE ELVIS WORLD!! I KID YOU NOT!...Paul? Have an extra free I'll Be Back?! :smt006