All posts with more than 3000 Hits, prior to 2008

Wed May 16, 2007 2:33 pm

Thanks for your opinion Piers.

I have always found your comments regarding sound quality to be accurate, fair and a very worthwhile part of your excellent reviews.

Keep up the good work!

Wed May 16, 2007 4:06 pm

Let's be careful not to step out-of-line with personal insinuations here.

'An.Am.T' is a very good CD content-wise and everyone is welcome to their own opinions.
It just seems a little odd that with all the praise that the other FTDs have got regarding sound improvements (What a cracker '50 Millions Fans' is) that Johnny Savage seems to believe the same of this one.

And let me say what a joy it is to get 'Opening Night' as an official release and in fine audio too without the distortion of the old bootleg (which was one of my favourites).

So I am not pointing fingers at Ms Riedel's work without backing up why I think something is not quite right about the multi-tracks (as others have).
She may have justifications regarding her strange ideas about the audio mix.

But surely Johnny Savage cannot be comparing this (IMHO) poor audio work with the likes of the Deluxe 'Elvis Presley' FTD or 'His Hand In Mine'?
They are like chalk & cheese in their approaches.

I don't get it,

Cheers
Piers

Wed May 16, 2007 4:32 pm

PiersEIN wrote:Hi Gang,
In reviewing Elvis CDs I always search for the positives.
After all, what's the point in saying that the 'Double Trouble' or 'Paradise Hawaiian Style' FTDs contained bad songs?

People who buy them presumably like the material and if there are some fun new outakes, Elvis studio interaction or audio improvement then that is what is worth investigating.
Even a real stinker like 'PHS' is pretty good fun as presented by FTD.

Of course not all of us are lucky enough to afford a good quality HiFi to be able to appreciate the great work that Kevan Budd, Sebastian etc do with the new Elvis releases.
I am sure that a lot of fans will listen to the DSD audio improved CDS in their cars, on low-end stereo systems, even on iPods.
However BMG obviously know that it IS a major selling-point since they regularly place stickers on the CD covers "DSD audio from Master recordings" etc.

However in the end it IS assuredly the content that matters the most.

So let's get on to 'An American Trilogy'.
Yes it is a great early 1972 live track selection. :smt023 agreed.
Maybe it could have done with filling up with more Opening Night tunes but, hey, perhaps I'm just being greedy.

But reading Johnny Savage's FECC review here today ... "the improvement in audio quality by engineer Lene Reidel, as with the entire CD, is terrific."
Yes, the Opening Night is fabulously improved over the old bootleg, but the "Whole CD" - I don't think so!

Lene Reidel may not have the luxury of labours-of-love time that die-hards like Kevan & Sebastian do but this CD is a real step backwards from previous issues of the same material.

Did she not listen to the 'Burning Love' compile which had a far more impressive high-end?
Listen to the crispness to Ronnie Tutt's cymbals on earlier 'It's Over' releases.

What about Vic Anesini's wonderful work with 'The Impossible Dream' on 'Elvis: Inspirational' which positively shimmers, and is better still?
Did Lene never listen to the most recently released version of the work she was doing?
(And yes, there is a digital splat at 04:09 on 'It's Impossible')

But what really s**ts me here is even noticeable on my crappy car stereo!
What on earth is James Burton's guitar doing mixed to the left and Glen D Hardin's piano stuck on the right channel with the orchestra strings and backing vocals?

Was Glen's piano ever on the right of the stage next to The Stamps? I don't think so.
I even had to check that the CD channels weren't mistakenly reversed. But they are not, she has positively mixed it this way. (Bring back Dennis!).

But does this actually make any difference to the music?
Well actually to me it does, and that's why I noticed.

Did Glen Hardin arrange 'It's Impossible'?
If he did, he should be most annoyed as now that fabulous piano intro (left channel on all releases so far) is buried on the right channel with the orchestra. It's hardly there at all. Same on 'It's Over'.
In fact Glen's piano is messed around like this on the whole CD.

And then what about that lovely part where J D Sumner joins in with Elvis on 'The Impossible Dream'?
Well guess what, that's also (nearly) mixed out too.

Maybe Lene wanted to present us with 'different' mixes so that we weren't buying the same mixed tracks all over again, but I doubt it. The multi-track part of the CD overall is missing high-end treble, so something more is going on.

Now as I said, I do look for the good things in reviews so I won't add so much audio detail to my EIN review - but this is a great forum to share my feelings as you all understand.

I hope that Johnny Savage paid for his 'An American Trilogy' FTD as I did.

Yes, the content is very fine indeed as my EIN review will state, but I would like to see Johnny Savage explain how he thinks that "the improvement in audio quality by engineer Lene Reidel is terrific on the entire CD".

Cheers
Piers


Spot on the money again, Piers.

Sun May 20, 2007 4:50 pm

I've had this Cd a few days now and as usual I appreciate all the Elvis Concerts I manage to get hold of. I love Elvis live, and this CD pleases me greatly. I know having guitar etc on the wrong side can be annoying, but then again my wife still has trouble telling her left hand from her right. :lol:
In the car turn right...oops!!! :lol: Maybe it's a female thing!!!OOps I'm gonna cop it now. :lol:
Piers pretty well covers it all in his post!!!


8)

Sun May 20, 2007 5:06 pm

P.S. If you want good honest reviews pop over to EIN, they are an excellent site and have the best reviewers in the business!!!

:wink:


But I s'pose you all know that!!! :D

Sun May 20, 2007 5:52 pm

If Reidel mastered "An American Trilogy," then who mixed it?

Thu May 24, 2007 2:31 am

There is that good point that maybe Reidel was supplied a poor initial down-mix tape of the multitracks - but I'm not sure where it would have come from as we never had those strange channel mixes before.
Who would have buried Glen D Hardin's piano & JD's vocal?

And if I was Reidel surely the first reaction would have been to say to FTD that either I needed better quality mix-down Masters supplied so as to be able to match 'Elvis LIVE" versions (or at least the better mixes of 'Burning Love') and if not, at least put on the FTD sleeve who did do the poor mix.
(Doesn't sound like a Dennis Ferrante mix).

I still don't get who would have done this poor mix-down and what for. They aren't the 70's box-set versions or any others.

as someone noted . . .
This is our last chance to get these multitracks in CD format of this 1972 concert - and as we know it could have been much punchier, which is a shame.

Let's not be too harsh here and appreciate what we have...

AGREED, content-wise it is a great FTD.

Cheers
Piers

Thu May 24, 2007 7:35 am

PiersEIN wrote:Who would have buried Glen D Hardin's piano & JD's vocal?

Well don't be so quick to let Ferrante off of the hook. Look at his handy work on disc one of the Live In Las Vegas box set where Larry Muhoberac's keyboard work was mixed out of the show. Bottom line, FTD dropped the ball on the mix of An American Trilogy, but they should be praised for the release in general as the content is awesome.

Thu May 24, 2007 9:11 pm

I have also wondered about who did the mixing on the CD. Have been listening to it a lot since I got it, and the mastering actually seems nice (can listen to it without getting a headache even with headphones).

Maybe next time someone interviews Ernst they can ask about this CD. And also ask about the error on Unchained Melody.......

Thu May 24, 2007 10:14 pm

can the master reels be put in the machine and transfered to 3 track without remixing, is it posible that no remixing has taken place, just a direct transfer? of course I am not an expert, that's why my is a litlle naive.

Thu May 24, 2007 10:40 pm

midnightx wrote:Well don't be so quick to let Ferrante off of the hook. Look at his handy work on disc one of the Live In Las Vegas box set where Larry Muhoberac's keyboard work was mixed out of the show.

My understanding of August 1969 mix anomalies is that the choices of instruments in the sound picture were made on the spot by Felton Jarvis, and these decisions changed from show to show. An engineer can only make do with what is on the existing tapes.

So, perhaps our dedicated fan base can take a step back to consider such facts before jumping all over the work being done in the past few years.

Thu May 24, 2007 10:50 pm

drjohncarpenter wrote:
midnightx wrote:Well don't be so quick to let Ferrante off of the hook. Look at his handy work on disc one of the Live In Las Vegas box set where Larry Muhoberac's keyboard work was mixed out of the show.

My understanding of August 1969 mix anomalies is that the choices of instruments in the sound picture were made on the spot by Felton Jarvis, and these decisions changed from show to show. An engineer can only make do with what is on the existing tapes.

So, perhaps our dedicated fan base can take a step back to consider such facts before jumping all over the work being done in the past few years.


This certainly makes sense considering these shows were recorded on 8 track reels. Not having ready access to my collection at this time of posting can someone advise how the following two recordings from the show in question released prior to Live In Las Vegas compare:

Heartbreak Hotel as released on Collectors Gold
Yesterday as released on Elvis Aron Presley

Thanks.

Thu May 24, 2007 11:21 pm

Doc, you're expressing thoughts that I have had many times regarding the live recordings of Elvis.
I'm not sure about the previously released tracks on An Americna Trilogy as released on Burning Love and Live In Las Vegas if they were remixed and/or overdubbed in some way before release.
I don't have the session notes at hand. But, I have a feeling that what we have got here on AAT may simply be more or less the "raw" material from which the previous released songs were mixed/remixed or overdubbed??
I'm not a sound expert, still I find the sound on AAT good, and I don't have problem with the "mix"!

Thu May 24, 2007 11:42 pm

bajo wrote:I find the sound on AAT good, and I don't have problem with the "mix"!

Nor do I -- frankly, the less J.D. the better.

Fri May 25, 2007 12:02 am

My understanding of August 1969 mix anomalies is that the choices of instruments in the sound picture were made on the spot by Felton Jarvis, and these decisions changed from show to show. An engineer can only make do with what is on the existing tapes


Guess you dont own any boots then? Because the majority of the boots i own do not have these as you put it "mix anomalies" even the few that have incomplete recordings without the later overdubbs still retain a strong base of sonic consistancy.

When these same raw/complete/undubbed WHATEVER recordings are released on import from the same tapes, tell me why we have a consistancy on the imports and on the official releases ?

Yet on the releases that are mixed and mastered by the likes of Ferrante reidel we have all these wierd mixes?

We are not talking about mono soundboards here we are talking about multitrack.

Sorry but there is too much evidence that proves all these "mix anomalies" were not caused by Feltons limited recording options.

It points to the door of the cowboys.


changing the mixes and altering history Since the early 1990's

unashamedly taking credit for the skilled work of the pros Since the early 1990's

Fri May 25, 2007 12:12 am

GERRY wrote:
My understanding of August 1969 mix anomalies is that the choices of instruments in the sound picture were made on the spot by Felton Jarvis, and these decisions changed from show to show. An engineer can only make do with what is on the existing tapes


Guess you dont own any boots then? Because the majority of the boots i own do not have these as you put it "mix anomalies" even the few that have incomplete recordings without the later overdubbs still retain a strong base of sonic consistancy.


What bootleg releases exactly are you referring to that have used the original multitrack sources? Indeed what release details the very show in question? A soundboard source for example would bear no relation to the assigned track layout on a multitrack source recorded the same night.

Fri May 25, 2007 12:22 am

So back to you..IF you can prove that Ernst and his cowboys are working with tapes that have all these "mix anomolies" on them , IF you can prove that the likes of Ferrante , Reidel are not changing the mixes..then..

Then i will shut up.





changing the mixes and altering history Since the early 1990's

unashamedly taking credit for the skilled work of the pros Since the early 1990's

Fri May 25, 2007 12:35 am

GERRY wrote:So back to you..IF you can prove that Ernst and his cowboys are working with tapes that have all these "mix anomolies" on them , IF you can prove that the likes of Ferrante , Reidel are not changing the mixes..then..

Then i will shut up


Hold on now, you haven't answered the question. What bootlegs do you own that have used the multitrack sources? Name even one.

You don't own any do you GERRY, because they don't exist do they GERRY?

Fri May 25, 2007 12:49 am

In my view a lot of things can get messed up when they go through the mastering stage. Consider the track "A big hunk o' love" from Feb 14, 1972 MS which was first released on WFTK, and now also appears on AAT. For some reason the track is about 6dB louder (and severely clipped) on WFTK compared to AAT. The mix is exactly the same.

In other words you can have a perfectly good mix that can still get screwed up during the mastering stage. The tendency of most mastering engineers is to use whatever gadget they have available in the arsenal to change the original sound, which more often than not amounts to an excessive amount of EQ, compression and reverb.

I really believe mastering is the main culprit here (and not mixing), and unfortunately there is only a small number of mastering engineers who subscribe to the art of audiophile mastering (which is mastering that does not lend attention to itself but rather to the music). This does not seem to be a philosophy that Tocano subscribes to!

Fri May 25, 2007 12:59 am

I never said that every import comes from the source tapes hopefully they are locked away safe.

I would suggest that copies exist in one form or another.

All i am saying is that the only time i have came across such blatant mix anomolies is at the hands of you know who.

Every other source stays much more consistant to the original mastertape/copy/whatever.



changing the mixes and altering history Since the early 1990's

unashamedly taking credit for the skilled work of the pros Since the early 1990's

Fri May 25, 2007 1:08 am

GERRY wrote:I never said that every import comes from the source tapes hopefully they are locked away safe.


I know you didn't, you wrote quite clearly:

"Because the majority of the boots i own do not have these as you put it "mix anomalies" even the few that have incomplete recordings without the later overdubbs still retain a strong base of sonic consistancy."

So I ask you again, what are these bootleg releases that you say you own? Without this information your point is null and void - as well you know.

GERRY wrote:I would suggest that copies exist in one form or another.


Based on what? Even if copies of the original multitracks did excist they would still be from the same original source multritrack be it a mix down or not. As nothing has been released as such this speculation is also null and void.

GERRY wrote:All i am saying is that the only time i have came across such blatant mix anomolies is at the hands of you know who.

Every other source stays much more consistant to the original mastertape/copy/whatever.


Again, what other sources are you referring to? Please be specific and detailed.

Thanks.

Fri May 25, 2007 1:33 am

A logical question remains: Why would Ernst or whoever go through all this in order to screw up as much of the outtakes as they can???
Is it their main goal to screw up all releases to annoy the fans as much as they can??
Following the birth of FTD, knowing the circumstances, the limited budgets and so on, I have a feeling that there has been a compromise between spending money on expensive audio restoration or leave the project alone.
I think that what Ernst has been doing is somewhere in between here.
And as such I can't help but beeing pleased over most of the FTD output.
I think people tend to forget the enormous output we have had so far on FTD?
Without Ernst, who knows what we would have had other than the mainstream BMG releases?
I'll stick to my statement that I like An American Trilogy as it is!

Fri May 25, 2007 1:53 am

All i need to say every single release that Ernst and his cowboys have not tampered with keeps close to the original.

David Bendeth had incomplete tapes to work with and all manner pf problems with the tapes yet still his mixes didnt exhibit huge errors such as having instruments in the wrong channel, and having everything centered in a wall of sound , thin sound , missing instruments , i could go on and on.

Plus David Bendeth informed us that the unmastered mix sounded even better!

NO for whatever reason this lies in the hands of people like Ferrante and Reidel.

Matthew do you seriously think we would have all these poor/incorrect mixes and poor mastering if someone like Vic Anesini was our man?



changing the mixes and altering history Since the early 1990's

unashamedly taking credit for the skilled work of the pros Since the early 1990's

Fri May 25, 2007 1:57 am

GERRY wrote:All i need to say every single release that Ernst and his cowboys have not tampered with keeps close to the original.

David Bendeth had incomplete tapes to work with and all manner pf problems with the tapes yet still his mixes didnt exhibit huge errors such as having instruments in the wrong channel, and having everything centered in a wall of sound , thin sound , missing instruments , i could go on and on.

Plus David Bendeth informed us that the unmastered mix sounded even better!

NO for whatever reason this lies in the hands of people like Ferrante and Reidel.

Matthew do you seriously think we would have all these poor/incorrect mixes and poor mastering if someone like Vic Anesini was our man?


Still my question remains unanswered. Your post has nothing to do with this discussion. Now, are you going to answer my question? I believe everyone keeping up with this thread will be eager to see your answer. Come on GERRY, don't keep us all waiting!

Fri May 25, 2007 2:06 am

I'm not to knowledgeable on recording processes, but I would think original recordings would come out with the instruments in the correct position.

No? :?

8)