All posts with more than 3000 Hits, prior to 2008

Re: when sun

Thu Feb 15, 2007 8:33 pm

Rob wrote:
Kenneth wrote:All the live-versions of That's All Right Mama from 76/77 are better than the Sun studio-version.

And that October 1974 tour was a great one too, wasn't it?


I'am so happy that you finally have heard the shows from that tour. :lol: South Bend 30 Sept 74. Best show since Hampton 9 apr 72. Well known fact amoung us fans as well as newspapers.... :wink:

Thu Feb 15, 2007 8:56 pm

Some very good posts on this 4th page!

Thu Feb 15, 2007 9:13 pm

So what if nothing gets discovered again. We have enough Elvis material for a lifetime and a half!!!!!!

this thread

Thu Feb 15, 2007 9:15 pm

:smt015

Thu Feb 15, 2007 9:20 pm

is that an old git sleeping :lol:

Fri Feb 16, 2007 1:45 am

Before I became a fan back in December of '01, the first Elvis film I seen was That's The Way It Is Special Edition. My Grandma had taped it to VHS when it was aired on AMC. So that was the first time that I actually seen Elvis perform live on stage, or pretty much the first time I had seen Elvis period. And that film had a huge influence on me and was and is a large part of why I love the '70's era!!

And Kenneth, that 9/30/74 show in Southbend sure does have a rockin' version of Blue Suede Shoes don't it :D ..too bad the sound is really bad.

Fri Feb 16, 2007 3:18 am

I don't know about Uncle Pen or Tennessee Saturday Night, but I do know that Rock Around The Clock exists somewhere cause I heard it (it was actually just a snippet) on an Elvis tribute radio show about 14 years ago.
It's funny but at the time I didn't really think anything of it. There were a lot of those albums out that featured Hayride recordings, and I just assumed it was from one of those and that I'd get it eventually. Then I just basically forgot about it. But it's out there somewhere folks. It exists. So there's hope it will turn up one day.

Fri Feb 16, 2007 4:56 am

I haven't been able to make it to FECC as much lately and that probably won't change, but it's still a pleasure. One always has to sift through it, of course, but it's worth staying having some patience with. There's no editor here -and that's both a good and bad thing.

I do think some of our newer members (accounts opened as recently as last year or way under 1000 posts) have some nerve chasing off one of the most accomplished Elvis fans/ writers/ researchers / etc. on the board.

Ger Rijff can be ornery but he's earned it, particularly when provoked. Folks like Sid and "Kenneth" need to earn their keep around here a bit.

He is one of the few people who's earned the right to pop off on nearly every Elvis era, whether you realize who and what he's done - or not.

Kenneth and Sid: go to the "naughty spot." :evil:

Fri Feb 16, 2007 5:26 am

Elvis' Babe- You think Elvis on Milton Berle is whitewashed? Or Elvis on Berle and Sullivan lacks humor? Look at his face on "Hound Dog" it's blazing with humor. "Love Me" from the second Sullivan show is wild parody. I contend that the '50s is very similar in on-stage temperament to the '70s Elvis.

Pete maybe only that snippet of "Rock Around the Clock" exists. I'd love to hear that.
Last edited by likethebike on Fri Feb 16, 2007 9:08 am, edited 1 time in total.

Fri Feb 16, 2007 5:39 am

LTB -
The snippet I heard was the "1, 2, 3 o'clock 4 o'clock rock" and so on bit right up to the "we're gonna rock around the clock tonight" line that comes right before the "put your gladrags on" verse. In the background there was loud screaming from the audience. It had the same ambience as those Hayride recordings have, and it sounded like a sizable audience rather than in a club.

Fri Feb 16, 2007 6:31 am

Elvis' Babe wrote:the thing that strikes me as being the reason for the 'kids' coming here tending to veer towards the later material, is because it does have a more modern feel... for footage, you get a choice between black and white footage where everybody has their pants pulled up to their chests and extremely old people in every shot but elvis, and then in the '70s ....




LTB is right: you're really missing the essence of '50's Elvis with such reductionism. You might as well pick apart "Poor Boy. "

Young people aren't the only barometer of "cool," let alone what is lasting, despite the enduring youthful bias in the U.S.

There's an accessibility to color, granted, Elvis at his best in the '50s transcended the supposed limitation of color and comparably primitive and quant television programming. Elvis on Ed Sullivan (or Uncle Miltie or the Dorseys) will transcend the decades by enduring as historic television, long after the last "American Idol" star or this or that Hip Hop "artist" fades quickly into oblivion. :lol:

Fri Feb 16, 2007 6:57 am

oh, com'on, i was jibing both eras, in case you missed the line about bellbottoms, muttonchops, beehives and go-go boots. both are dated, but at least the '70s footage has an accessibility in terms of footage quality.

the essence of '50s elvis--somebody who changed the culture, but that still doesn't make it remotely modern. great music that will last forever, yes. but no '50s track will do an allc. the '70s remains the untapped material that stands half an inkling of a chance with today's audiences. #1 they haven't heard it, so they haven't already made up their minds about it. you can't make somebody a fan if you are just using material they've already decided that they hate or are indifferent towards. give them something that will rock their foundations with disbelief and awe.

no matter how cool you think '50s elvis is, most people think it is silly, quaint or a mixture of the two--simple times gone past. no matter how bright the golden days did shine.

and i'm not talking my perspective, because i'd transfer myself to that era in a heartbeat. well, if i could magically connect to the internet with a home computer that isn't made out of a room of tubes that has the capabilities of a calculator, and hook up to modern cable and home video. :lol:

Fri Feb 16, 2007 7:21 am

And how many people have you polled? By definition, for today's teens and under-30 set, even the 1980s -and yes, the '90s are comparably ancient as we near enter the late '00s.

EB, it's a false premise. It's all ancient at first glance and was ancient twenty years ago when I was graduating from High School. I heard the same stuff about Elvis from friends who couldn't get into it (ah, "wisdom" of youth) because it was "old" and somehow "not cool." A few years later, they each started to get into it and as recently as a few months ago, one of the more rabidly anti-Elvis friends I had suddenly came around after getting "Second to None" for Christmas.

Your comments seem betray your own discomfort with the "oldness" of black & white footage. It looked old when I first saw it in the late '70s and by 1981 in "This Is Elvis"...but the man jumped off the screen and besides, the audio is what counts. His records still are legendary in the way that kinescopes might fail to demonstrate.

Let'em watch that "'56" DVD and if they can't get it, the hell with 'em.

ImageImage

Kids many generations from now will mature into adults who will, if learned at all, will want to soak up a video or movie like this. But mass popularity? That's all in the past and no longer necessary at the teen level.
There's nothing left to prove. Keep his legacy alive, to be sure, buff and polish his work where needed, but "new" and "relevant" Elvis? Please.

Humphrey Bogart, Great Garbo, Elvis Presley: all are among the immortals that we just don't have to worry about young people "not getting." Give'em time.
Last edited by Gregory Nolan Jr. on Fri Feb 16, 2007 7:31 am, edited 3 times in total.

Fri Feb 16, 2007 7:24 am

Elvis 1950's footage, black and white. So what, that does not matter to me. When I first got that Ed Sullivan set back in December and first watched it I thought Elvis never looked cooler !!!

Fri Feb 16, 2007 8:08 am

and you completely ignored past my first paragraph.

it isn't just the footage. it is the sound as well. the sounds of the '50s aren't dated in the dated technology way, but the fact that the music is very simple and people today aren't. it is a sad fact on our part rather than the past. people today are more likely to relate to his serious ballads or deep-voiced raw rock than milk cow blues boogie, hiccuping vocals and "we're gonna kiss and a-kiss, and a-kiss some more...", just to name easy targets.

take a big hunk o' love and burning love. i once sent them together to a friend who was willing to listen to some tracks, but was adamantly hateful of it--she chose burning love as the stronger track. in return, i endured hours and hours of simon and garfunkel. we had about a year plus of wingeing about each other's music--all eras and hundreds of tracks.

the '70s material is more diverse and powerful. his voice became a lot more powerful. his persona seemed a lot more free--one feels like they are hearing/seeing elvis cut loose with his later material. he was a big boy then--he got to do his own introductions and make his own jokes. there simply isn't enough live footage from the '50s to even remotely compete with what we have left over from the '70s.

as for my friend that endured many many hours of my fandoms--'56 and ttwii are two things she did see all or the majority of. ttwii was her favorite by a long shot. she even mentioned that she thought the skits from the '50s were embarrassing (especially steve allen's hound dog). on the other hand, she thought ttwii was the most entertaining concert video she'd ever seen--she loved the humor, the music, all of it. she did prefer my homemade studio track compilations over my live compilation discs, though.

also, my point that no '50s track stands a chance of doing an allc (a little less conversation) still stands.

you don't change minds by giving them what they know--you give them something they don't expect--like 'mature' music or a dose of humor from elvis presley. they don't see it coming. the definition of insanity is repeating the same action and expecting different results. if they don't like hound dog after hearing it a hundred times--it is time to try a different tactic.
Last edited by Elvis' Babe on Fri Feb 16, 2007 8:23 am, edited 2 times in total.

Fri Feb 16, 2007 8:15 am

I read your whole post and stand by what I said. Listen, you're speaking to a fan of the '70s Elvis so you don't have to belabor the point. At this point in my life, I relate more to his more mature music, but I also go back to his defining '50s work, unapologetically.

The remix of "ALLC" was a fluke, a fun one, but what of it? I really think his actual music (all three decades) is so different from that track and someone will have to have the "big ears" to either get it or not. I'll play to whatever one is likely to get into first according to who they are, but if they can't wrap their ears around his most definitive work from any decade, I would wonder about them. If they have to start with "From Elvis In Memphis" or "TTWII" is, so be it. But it doesn't mean the '50s are some kind of lame era. That's absurd.

One need not dwell on his lowest moments in the '50s. Why keep mentioning that Steve Allen performance? Elvis himself was on record for hating what they did to him. So why play it for a new fan? That's hardly a representative piece. That's like playing Marlon Brando in "The Island of Dr. Moreau" instead of "On the Waterfront."

If you (or your friend) cannot recognize that "Elvis Presley," "Elvis," or, say "Elvis At Sun" are unabashed classics, then I can't help you. :D
Last edited by Gregory Nolan Jr. on Fri Feb 16, 2007 8:27 am, edited 1 time in total.

Fri Feb 16, 2007 8:26 am

i was watching the '56 dvd at my house on my own in the kitchen. she ended up seeing part of it, and commented on it. i wasn't showing it to a new fan so much as we were waiting 'til we were to go out to the corvette diner (oldies diner), so i thought it would be appropriate to watch it. anyway, i even told her that elvis considered it one of the most ridiculous performances of his career.

though being that my mom was 6 years old when it showed on tv, she has the opinion of it being 'cute' to this day. and it is cute--and it makes the world consciousness consider not just the performance but the SONG as 'cute'. ditto with songs like teddy bear. people associate them with souvenir sales. they sound like advertisements for stuffed animals.

Fri Feb 16, 2007 9:25 am

Sometimes you have to come to a piece. If '50s Elvis is too simple so is virtually all classic blues/gospel and country tract.

Simplicity is something that can be a virtue. What recording captures more of what it's all about than "Heartbreak Hotel"? It doesn't sound like something from the '50s. It sounds both futuristic and ancient, out of time. That outrageous echo, the tinkling jazz piano, those final guitar chords that sound like the end of a film noir. When Elvis sings, with that glorious mumble, in complete syncopation just with the bass on that opening chorus, I just shiver in a way that I don't shiver hearing a more "complex" composition by John Denver, the Spice Girls, or Aimee Mann or any other later performer you'd want to mention. To paraphrase Elvis himself, it don't sound like nobody. It's got everything you want in a record, flash, sex, violence, energy, despair. It may be simple in musical structure but in total it's like a two minute movie. Writer Paul Simpson said it got everything that J.D. Salinger was trying to say in "Catcher in the Rye". I would say it got more.

The writer Camille Paglia, certainly not a simplistic person, said that hearing "Heartbreak Hotel" convinced her for the first time that pop culture could also be high art.

The idea that people today are somehow more complicated than our forebears is fallacious. These were people who were alive after the drop of an atomic bomb, people who were having centuries old opinions on race and sex challenged, whose parents lived through a World War and a depression.

When I go to the record stores and find some youngster searching for Elvis, he's almost looking for the Sun sessions or a hits compilation that includes all of Elvis' hits 50s on out.

Pete- Sound on "Rock Around the Clock" equivalent to the stuff on The First Live Recordings or "Hearts of Stone"?
Last edited by likethebike on Fri Feb 16, 2007 11:09 am, edited 1 time in total.

Fri Feb 16, 2007 10:52 am

Gregory Nolan Jr. wrote:I haven't been able to make it to FECC as much lately and that probably won't change, but it's still a pleasure. One always has to sift through it, of course, but it's worth staying having some patience with. There's no editor here -and that's both a good and bad thing.

I do think some of our newer members (accounts opened as recently as last year or way under 1000 posts) have some nerve chasing off one of the most accomplished Elvis fans/ writers/ researchers / etc. on the board.

Ger Rijff can be ornery but he's earned it, particularly when provoked. Folks like Sid and "Kenneth" need to earn their keep around here a bit.

He is one of the few people who's earned the right to pop off on nearly every Elvis era, whether you realize who and what he's done - or not.

Kenneth and Sid: go to the "naughty spot." :evil:


I have followed you on this MB and of over 6000 posts I get a feeling that you haven't time listening and studying Elvis. If you think that I have more respect to a guy like Ger Rijff or a person who have posted 1000+ posts here you are wrong my friend. In fact, I'am more interested in the fans who don't contribute much here. They have also a story to tell, but some of them don't dare because they are afraid of some of the 1000+ posters here :wink:
Last edited by Kenneth on Fri Feb 16, 2007 11:58 am, edited 1 time in total.

Fri Feb 16, 2007 11:05 am

What?

Fri Feb 16, 2007 1:51 pm

Kenneth wrote:
Gregory Nolan Jr. wrote:I haven't been able to make it to FECC as much lately and that probably won't change, but it's still a pleasure. One always has to sift through it, of course, but it's worth staying having some patience with. There's no editor here -and that's both a good and bad thing.

I do think some of our newer members (accounts opened as recently as last year or way under 1000 posts) have some nerve chasing off one of the most accomplished Elvis fans/ writers/ researchers / etc. on the board.

Ger Rijff can be ornery but he's earned it, particularly when provoked. Folks like Sid and "Kenneth" need to earn their keep around here a bit.

He is one of the few people who's earned the right to pop off on nearly every Elvis era, whether you realize who and what he's done - or not.

Kenneth and Sid: go to the "naughty spot." :evil:


I have followed you on this MB and of over 6000 posts I get a feeling that you haven't time listening and studying Elvis. If you think that I have more respect to a guy like Ger Rijff or a person who have posted 1000+ posts here you are wrong my friend. In fact, I'am more interested in the fans who don't contribute much here. They have also a story to tell, but some of them don't dare because they are afraid of some of the 1000+ posters here :wink:



How I missed this post I will never know but here goes!

Dear Mr Gregory Nolan

Which part of my post do you think I need to go to the naughty spot for?

You obviously read it and thought it was a bit cheeky of me. Well I can assure you it wasn't and neither was it taken as such by Ger.

Tell you what......get in touch with Ger........ask him if I should go to the naughty spot........I have a feeling he may say Yes but only if only he can come with me

:wink:

Fri Feb 16, 2007 1:54 pm

Amen, to LTB and great analysis of the genius of "Heartbreak Hotel," the blues and other "simple music." Likewise, we can extend that to "That's All Right" or "Blue Moon" or any other timeless tunes of the '50s.

"Kenneth," earn your keep around here. I have no need to defend myself to a "newbie" who calls the Sun Sessions "childish." I just say have a little respect to Ger (even if he was way too cranky) unless you're prepared to offer us your contributions to the Elvis world.

Fri Feb 16, 2007 2:22 pm

Sure Ger may have knowledge than me in the Elvis world, but he has got a more inflated ego and temper than his entire book collection. You don't like the future of Elvis fans.............well would you rather them just die out!! Ger, we're doing a lot for the future of the man. I am always trying my very hardest to campaign that Elvis was a serious artist, and to make people understand the man behind the stupid stereotype. Without the youth of Elvis fans after the older bunch, Elvis has no future. End of story, bottom line

Fri Feb 16, 2007 2:25 pm

LTB -
I don't have First Live Recordings, but my recollection is that Rock Around The Clock sounded like Tweedle Dee. But then again, I haven't heard TD in quite a while.

I have faith that Ernst will find this one day. He's a fan of detective stories, and he has certainly used his own investigative skills to turned up some gems over the years.

Fri Feb 16, 2007 2:30 pm

You´d better watch out, Greg, you're being followed! :wink: