All posts with more than 3000 Hits, prior to 2008

Thu Feb 01, 2007 8:09 am

Greg Geller was working at the birth of the CD era, so anyone who dumps on him for audiophile reasons is being unfair. His skill is a compiler much like Ernst. He has done absolutely phenomenal work over the past two decades pasting together truly classy early rock and soul CDs. In 1983, he compiled what still stands as the definitive Jackie Wilson compilation the two LPJackie Wilson Story. It's been surpassed in sound but it is was designed to present Jackie in the best possible light and the running order, songs and notes did just that. If you have a deep collection of oldies, you'll see Geller's name often on there.

I was never, never a fan of Joan Deary. Legendary Performer and this box aside, I thought she was mostly a hack who didn't have a clue about Elvis' art. She may have been a fan but she was flying blind. She was responsible for many of the lamest Elvis projects ever including the deservedly maligned Elvis Sings For Children. The Fool LP as it stood was no classic but compared to the lineup that Deary chose it was a phenemonal success. Even the Legendary Performer stuff was soon outstripped by other compilations.

My first exposure to "It's Only Love" was via a Ronnie McDowell remake in the godawful Elvis and the Beauty Queen movie where the characters in the movie treated it a signature piece.

Thu Feb 01, 2007 11:40 am

drjohncarpenter wrote:As I cited somewhere else recently, Joan is given a production credit for the live 1956 Tupelo recordings, the 1959 and 1966 home demos from Germany and California only. Gregg Geller is the "Project A&R Director" for the remainder of A Golden Celebration. It was a good decision to omit the 1976 soundboard from the set.

Geller was a more sophisticated fan than Deary. He did some excellent work while at RCA, not only for Elvis. He released the previously-unknown, 1963 Sam Cooke Harlem Square Club tape in 1985 to well-deserved critical reviews -- it was a revelation for Cooke fans and rock enthusiasts worldwide. Geller's Presley reissues like Reconsider Baby (1985) "set the table" for the great achievements to follow by Ernst Jørgensen.


Reconsider Baby was one of the greatest Elvis albums of the 80's. More recently Geller put together highly acclaimed posthumous Johnny Cash album Personal File which was made up from Cash's homerecordings. However, I still feel that Golden Celebration could have been much better. It was a mainstream release but casual fans are not going to flip over relatively poor sounding recordings that duplicate the same songs over and over again. The box set is even worse when one knows how much good unreleased material RCA had at the time starting with shows taped for the Comeback Special (part of which was used on the box set), August '69 live performances and studio outtakes from all 3 decades. It could have been so much better.

Thu Feb 01, 2007 11:18 pm

Hav-A-Tampa wrote:
drjohncarpenter wrote:It was a good decision to omit the 1976 soundboard from the set.


I agree. I'm more fascinated by the fact that it was considered for the box set from the start.


Wasn't one of the December 76 soundboards under consideration? It wouldn't have been a major blow to the set. Certainly one can make a strong argument that one of the December 76 soundboards would have been just as good as an inclusion as the Summer 75 soundboard material used for the EAP set. The fact that Joan was considering using soundboard material from the December 76 period on either one of the sets isn't some sort of creative blunder. If RCA was considering using a soundboard of a 1970's era concert, it seems strange that they did not consider a board from a better concert year 1969-1972 or for that matter consider using a multi-track show from August 1970 or from the EOT shows. That is what is most strange. Both the Golden Celebration and EAP sets were great ideas and in some ways delivered the goods, but it is very odd that RCA sat on the August 1970 and EOT multi-tracks for not only those projects, but for 30 years.

Fri Feb 02, 2007 3:38 am

midnightx wrote:Wasn't one of the December 76 soundboards under consideration?

According to Presley expert Joe Tunzi, two 1976 live tapes were under consideration for A Golden Celebration (RCA 1984):

October 14, 1976 - Chicago, IL
December 29, 1976 - Birmingham, AL

Both later slipped out as "imports," and each has its merits. But the June 1975 recordings remain superior to either.

midnightx wrote:Certainly one can make a strong argument that one of the December 76 soundboards would have been just as good as an inclusion as the Summer 75 soundboard material used for the EAP set.

Perhaps, but one could make a better argument that the 1976 shows are more strikingly inconsistent, especially for the general public.

midnightx wrote:The fact that Joan was considering using soundboard material from the December 76 period on either one of the sets isn't some sort of creative blunder.

It was only under consideration for the 1984 project. Given the tracklisting of the rest of A Golden Celebration, it would seem quite a miscue to include later, relatively lackluster material alongside SUN outtakes, groundbreaking, early RCA-era live cuts and stone classic 1968 TV Special recordings.

midnightx wrote:... it is very odd that RCA sat on the August 1970 and EOT multi-tracks for not only those projects, but for 30 years.

Only about ten years! Elvis Aron Presley (RCA 1980) used multi-track outtakes from August 1970 (four) and February 1972 (1). Admitedly, that's not much!

---

LTB, I'm surprised you've made no comment on the observations in my first post!

Fri Feb 02, 2007 6:27 am

Well, reasonable people can disagree about the relative merits of December '76 versus June '75 (and I do like quite a bit of other shows from the latter), but I will agree that Joan Deary deserves to not be dismissed as a mere "hack," in LTB's scathing words.

As was stated above, she was behind the "Legendary" series, which was the first to truly embrace Elvis' now secure historic status in a package that is still fondly remembered and is rightly carried on by the fine folks at Madison these days. For the time, "Volume One" was quite a package, and I recall that either Guralnick or Marsh have waxed fondly over it. I don't quite fathom your disappointment with the series, LTB. Did you not buy them when they came out? For their pivotal role at the time, they deserve some respect.

You all have helped return me to my initial enthusiam for the "Elvis Aron Presley" boxset. I still recall when and where I first heard it, pouring over every side. It's not like I listened to some of that stuff repeatedly, but I definitely sat down and soaked up a lot of it on the first listening.

The fact that some of it was hard for me to listen to (it was the first time I'd ever been privy to such low-fi / rare material) nevertheless produced a real sense of discovery for me. After all, I was your typical mainstream fan, cluelessly picking up things like "Pure Gold," or that '78 gospel compilation, etc. so in comparison, this was a stunning dosage of prime Presley.

I do have to disgree about the comments on the gold box entitled "A Golden Celebration." I thought it was revolutionary and very welcome to give fans the TV shows in tight succession, repetition be damned. Those Tupelo shows also were a shocker. I couldn't believe that RCA had graced us with such rare - and raw- stuff. Likewise, the Hawaii '61 set made me feel like I was there at the proverbial "knothole," taking in a last-of-a-kind show.

It's easy to second guess what should have gone into such a package, but, disc for disc (the gold box especially), I was very satisfied with the integrity of each LP and the liner notes that guided you along. That we proceeded to have at least a quarter -century (and counting) stream of other releases is a good thing.

Consider both the silver and gold boxes as sort of proto-FTDs, on a mass scale and in multi-disc box versions...! The predecessor "Lengendary Preformer" series remains the "Adam and Eve" of the official release of outtakes and rare stuff on the FTD label-. Go back further to things like the first import ("Please Release Me" - which I just received on CD) and you see the real ancester of the FTDs...


**************************

Stan: Great sound clip of Joan Deary!

Fri Feb 02, 2007 11:06 am

Gregory Nolan Jr. wrote:As was stated above, she was behind the "Legendary" series, which was the first to truly embrace Elvis' now secure historic status in a package that is still fondly remembered and is rightly carried on by the fine folks at Madison these days. For the time, "Volume One" was quite a package, and I recall that either Guralnick or Marsh have waxed fondly over it. I don't quite fathom your disappointment with the series, LTB. Did you not buy them when they came out? For their pivotal role at the time, they deserve some respect.


They sure do! I love this series. I have the first three Legendary Performer LPs and play them quite a lot. Great records, and the booklets are just wonderful. Gotta find Volume 4 on eBay soon...

Ernst Jorgensen has also spoken fondly about this series.

Keith Richards, Jr.

Fri Feb 02, 2007 11:52 am

My hack comment was with Legendary Performer and EAP on the side. Virtually nothing else she did was worthwhile. Nearly everything between Elvis' death and the time Greg Geller took over was second rate. The cover and material choices on the first Our Memories of Elvis was terrible although we've come to appreciate the bare bones tapes idea. Elvis Sings for Children was maybe the dumbest and most haphazard Elvis compilation ever. This in the immediate aftermath of his death. Elvis Golden Records Vol. 5 almost made the compilation procedure used on Volume Four look intelligent. This is Elvis which should have been one of the great compilations featured truncated versions of songs, featured the same stupid overdubs they used in the movie, poor edits, wrong versions of songs etc. Greatest Hits was a baffling, poorly titled compilation. As a successor to the aimless Pure Gold which I believe Deary also compiled it made sense, in the non-Bizarro world it was pointless. And so on, so on.

My comments are also based upon Deary's comments in interviews about Elvis and his work. Her Fool lineup. Labeling "Reconsider Baby" a blues jam instead of by its proper title. I suspect if someone asked Ms. Deary to delineate the differences between Elvis Presley and say Ricky Nelson, she would have a tough time.

The LP comps are a bit overrated. They were solid for their time but they don't hold a candle to 90 percent of what Ernst does today. Compared to the work that people like Bob Hyde, Ernst, Geller, Harry Weinger etc. have done these past 30-35 years they come up short in character, presentation etc.

One of the first two Elvis albums I ever bought was Legendary Performer Volume one along with Golden Records Vol. 1. I played the latter much more.

Doc- I didn't comment largely because I thought your comments spoke for themselves. I would say I found the bootleg stuff very interesting because of the fact that at the time this release (EAP) was put out I was completely unaware that there was even a bootleg industry. You see the titles in reference books but it's tough to get back into that original context.

I would dispute your comment about the 1961 Elvis not being young. Despite his personal history, he was only 26 and the Elvis in this show has more of a direct connection to the Elvis of the 1950s than he does to the performer who emerged eight years later in Las Vegas.

Sat Feb 03, 2007 6:17 am

drjohncarpenter wrote:
midnightx wrote:Wasn't one of the December 76 soundboards under consideration?

According to Presley expert Joe Tunzi, two 1976 live tapes were under consideration for A Golden Celebration (RCA 1984):

October 14, 1976 - Chicago, IL
December 29, 1976 - Birmingham, AL

Both later slipped out as "imports," and each has its merits. But the June 1975 recordings remain superior to either.

midnightx wrote:Certainly one can make a strong argument that one of the December 76 soundboards would have been just as good as an inclusion as the Summer 75 soundboard material used for the EAP set.

Perhaps, but one could make a better argument that the 1976 shows are more strikingly inconsistent, especially for the general public.

midnightx wrote:The fact that Joan was considering using soundboard material from the December 76 period on either one of the sets isn't some sort of creative blunder.

It was only under consideration for the 1984 project. Given the tracklisting of the rest of A Golden Celebration, it would seem quite a miscue to include later, relatively lackluster material alongside SUN outtakes, groundbreaking, early RCA-era live cuts and stone classic 1968 TV Special recordings.

midnightx wrote:... it is very odd that RCA sat on the August 1970 and EOT multi-tracks for not only those projects, but for 30 years.

Only about ten years! Elvis Aron Presley (RCA 1980) used multi-track outtakes from August 1970 (four) and February 1972 (1). Admitedly, that's not much!

The inclusion of home recordings and the phenominal Burbank 68 sit-down recordings on the "A Golden Celebration" package was the right creative decision made as a 1976 soundboard would have been a little out of place for many reasons as you point out.

Still, the decision by Deary/Geller to include flat and dull soundboard recordings from the summer of 1975 on EAP to represent Elvis' 70's concert work was off the mark. Why not include Elvis' 1972 Richmond show or Greensboro show (which were both multi-tracked and could have offered incredible sound)? Maybe they weren't available at the time, but that is doubtful. There were better options to say the least.

Sat Feb 03, 2007 5:28 pm

Generally Elvis’ seventies singles did better in the UK than they did stateside. With this in mind it’s strange that RCA UK chose not to release “It’s Only Love” back in 1971.

As far as the 1980 single release is concerned, the song was indeed catchy, and I think the fact that it had been overlooked nine years previously and only appeared on the “In Demand” album in the UK, which was basically a fan’s release, gave the general public the impression that it was a ‘new’ Presley track.

The fact that the only unreleased song from the album, “Beyond the Reef” was used as the single’s flip side must have surely boosted sales, as this made the track available to fans who couldn’t afford the box set at the time.

The box set blew me away at the time of its release. I was about 13 when the set came out, and still in the process of building a collection. I wasn’t buying things in any particular order, and therefore if I saw something considered rare and could afford to buy it, I would snap this up thinking that I might never get the chance again.

This made my collection a little uneven as I had a number of boots long before I had all of the masters, but the only live ‘50’s stuff I can remember owning prior to the EAP set was the “From The Waist Up” album which featured the Ed Sullivan Shows in fairly poor quality, so I had no complaints about the sound on the ’56 Vegas cuts or the 1961 Hawaii set.

Elsewhere even the sides that we may dismiss now were much more exciting for me at the time. Albums such as “Fool” and a number of the old single releases were only available on import in the UK at the time, so “The Lost Singles” and the “Elvis at the Piano” set introduced me to some decent tracks that may otherwise have been difficult to track down.

A 1975 show may be commonplace now, but back then the only live stuff I had outside of the regular RCA releases was audience recorded, so hearing Elvis fool around a little and perform a live version of “T-R-O-U-B-L-E” in that sort of quality was really special at the time.

I would agree that overall the set was an expansion of the “Legendary Performer” concept, with a very similar booklet, and entire albums given over to different eras of the Presley career rather than individual tracks. I have the set on CD now, but I wore my vinyl copy out at the time!

Sat Feb 03, 2007 6:09 pm

drjohncarpenter wrote:Geller was a more sophisticated fan than Deary.


When I was a fan club president, I got to know Joan very well and she eventually became a good friend. That being said, I could not agree more with Doc's assessment of her professionally. Joan listened to her heart more than her head when it came to Elvis releases. She often told me that she didn't feel she got the respect from the label that she should and attributed that to being a woman and "a softy". She once said that she had to fight RCA for every single release. Personally, I think Joan did some great things to promote Elvis, while giving the fans what we wanted, but she could (and should) have done so much more............and she knew it.

Tom

Sat Feb 03, 2007 9:37 pm

Well said, Tom. If anyone takes the time to download that interview with Joan Deary that Stan posted above, you can readily hear her genuine enthusiam for Elvis, and all eras at that.

LTB, I just bristle at dismissing anyone as a "hack," particularly one who at least was well meaning. I personally enjoyed "This Is Elvis" (the movie and the soundtrack) very much when it came out, and enjoyed the newer tracks on "Greatest Hits" but scratched my head over the title a bit.

I liked the "Memories of Elvis" series, although it was flawed. I enjoyed "He Walks Beside Me" when it came out in '78, albeit being too young to realize it re-hashed so much material, save for a great "If I Can Dream" outtake. The booklet alone redeemed it for me.

Whether Ms. Deary was the mastermind behind the children's album, I don't know. I thought that was a Colonel idea, shelved until Elvis could no longer veto it. (And since I have had kids, I've discovered at least some redeeming features for the set. :lol: )

I don't think the "Legendary Performer" LPs need any qualification whatsoever. Everything should be judged for their time and they were the "FTD's" of that era, one might say. That we today are graced with a format that affords you about 80 minutes instead of two-short sides of vinyl is just the march of time.


I assume Deary was taking on Greg Geller in that audio clip!
Last edited by Gregory Nolan Jr. on Sun Feb 04, 2007 3:53 am, edited 2 times in total.

Sat Feb 03, 2007 10:11 pm

Stan from Tintane wrote:gregory nolan jnr i will concure with you - lets make your point of
"I just think it had more to do with being a catchy song that some ten years later still sounded contempary enough for modern tastes."
make that number 5 on my list.
the single had a lot going for it on every front and lots of people purchased it for differing reasons and that made it a hit.

Here is joan deary talking very candid.

http://www.megaupload.com/?d=KCSJDIT2

opened my eyes when i first heard this :shock:
Thanks for that!

Sun Feb 04, 2007 12:50 am

Personally, I had no problem with Joan Deary's releases. I enjoyed them all. Moreso, than anything Gregg Geller did. I've listened to EAP more times through the years than I ever listened to GC (I find it too repetitive).

I'm glad Joan sometimes let her heart get in the way.

Sun Feb 04, 2007 1:37 am

Joan was the on site PRODUCER of both MSG and ALOHA recordings cause Felton was too ill..... Not bad. 8)

Sun Feb 04, 2007 4:06 am

Stan, I think some of those '68 tracks on the Gold Box were unreleased, if not all of them.

Let me qualify my remarks about the post-humous Joan Deary-era releases. Being starved for anything Elvis, I fully enjoyed these releases.

In hindsight, age and having seen what came out FTD even since the late '90s, I do think RCA was unduly stingy with unreleased material with their releases, right through the Geller era. It's hard to say that the Deary era had a great vision conceptually. The silver and gold boxes were major exceptions.

And from today's vantage point, most of us could easily retro-actively come up with a better release schedule from, say 1978-1984.

Starting with his work on the gold box, the Geller era has to be applauded and it did much to approach his work intelligently and in proper context. I do think the "Reconsider, Baby," "the Memphis Record" and the "The Complete Sun Session," were total triumphs at the time, in addition to the very successful two hit compilations, which I passed on at the time for obvious (duplication) reasons. I did have the "A Valentine's Gift for You," and both "Rocker" releases, but neither has aged well. At least the rocker releases were an attempt to re-position Elvis as a rockin' rebel again.

That's interesting that it is Dave Marsh she's talking about. Are you sure about that, Stan? I don't recall he had any role in the RCA gold box. He was a music critic. I thought the Aloha deluxe DVD set was the only thing he was involved with (liner notes) and even by then was a champion of '70s Elvis.

Surely it would be Geller who was the '50s fan she's taking about, don't you all think? They both got co-credit on the gold box but would never again work together.

Please do download all of that Deary interview, in pieces if need be!

P.S. Likethebike, I also have that Geller-compiled Jackie Wilson 2-LP set and for now it remains the only Wilson I've purchased. I found it used about six years ago and found it very intelligently laid out, including notes, etc.

Phew!

Sun Feb 04, 2007 4:33 am

likethebike wrote:I would say I found the bootleg stuff very interesting because of the fact that at the time this release (EAP) was put out I was completely unaware that there was even a bootleg industry.

Well, you can bet RCA was NOT unaware.

midnightx wrote:Still, the decision by Deary/Geller to include flat and dull soundboard recordings from the summer of 1975 on EAP ... Why not include Elvis' 1972 Richmond show or Greensboro show ...

Gregg Geller was not with RCA in 1980 -- Elvis Aron Presley was "Conceived and produced by Joan Deary."

The June 1975 SB tapes sound OK to my ears. At that point RCA had in print material or complete shows from 1969, 1970, 1972, 1973, 1974 and 1977. That fact, coupled with the likelihood that Deary really didn't know what was in the archives in 1979-80 -- they were still cataloging tape then -- made the 1975 "Dallas show" a very decent choice.

Tom in North Carolina wrote:Joan listened to her heart more than her head when it came to Elvis releases.

In mid-1982 I was able to meet and discuss Elvis releases with Joan. She was very kind, and her soft, easy manner recalled chats with my beloved grandmother. I asked why "There Goes My Everything" was reissued on 45. "Oh, we had so many letters from the fans about that one," she replied without a trace of irony. I was stunned.

I suspected RCA was somewhat reticent about unissued tapes, so I handed her a letter filled with possible reissue ideas that would not require anything "new." If she read it, I'll never know. But her next project was the pedestrian Memories of Christmas (RCA 1982).

Years later -- after Joan had been forced out -- some of the suggestions in that letter, compiling all the May 1963 masters onto an album made up to look like it came out that year, doing a "blues" compilation, giving the SUN material a proper reissue, putting a best of Stax 1973 LP together, or creating a Viva Las Vegas soundtrack LP, appeared under the guidance of Ernst and Roger.

JerryNodak wrote:Personally, I had no problem with Joan Deary's releases. I enjoyed them all. Moreso, than anything Gregg Geller did.

Elvis Sings For Children ... And Grownups Too! better than Reconsider Baby?

Elvis - Greatest Hits Volume One more than The Complete SUN Sessions?

Stan from Tintane wrote:joan deary along with roger semon was responsible for the two ep collections in the uk and they were amazing for their time and place in the elvis uk release story.

And they were incredibly disappointing to US fans who had to buy imported copies if they wanted to hear officially unreleased outtakes from 1958-1961. Why Joan -- don't think Roger was involved then -- did not find a place for them in the US market was a mystery.

Sun Feb 04, 2007 4:55 am

Interesting post... I'm glad at least one fan put pen to paper and actually tried to steer RCA in the right direction. The rest of us just sat back and took it . :lol:

Joan Deary may not have always known what she was doing but I get the sense from that audio-clip that she felt honored to be involved with Elvis releases. Was she the best pick? Hardly and from this thread, in fairness to LTB, I'm reminded how true that is.

For years, "Joan Deary" was just a name on the album that I never put much thought to, not much more than I do to UPC codes today. It's nice to know that she has also become part of the history that fans care about.

Re: Phew!

Sun Feb 04, 2007 10:51 am

drjohncarpenter wrote:The June 1975 SB tapes sound OK to my ears. At that point RCA had in print material or complete shows from 1969, 1970, 1972, 1973, 1974 and 1977. That fact, coupled with the likelihood that Deary really didn't know what was in the archives in 1979-80 -- they were still cataloging tape then -- made the 1975 "Dallas show" a very decent choice.


Well, she must have at least known that there was unreleased multitrack live recordings from '72 (MSG) and '73 (Aloha) as she was there at the time. Also, I remember seing a photo in TMAHM of a tape containing August '69 live recording (marked opening night) that was mastered in 1979 or 1980. I wonder was it considered to be released at that time? It's pretty amazing that they didn't use that on silver or gold box sets.

But I do agree that Dallas show was a fine choice. I liked the show at time a lot and I never noticed any flaws in the sound department. Of course today the standard for sound quality has risen quite a bit due to techinal advances but in 1980 it was fine.

Sun Feb 04, 2007 11:31 am

No offense is intended to those who knew Ms. Deary. However, the hubris of her attempt to take the production reins from Felton, who, for whatever his flaws, unlike Deary had actual experience making a pop record, has always rankled me as has the fact that her Legendary Performer Volumes were released with covers that could be confused with Elvis' current work. The comments I have read from her have betrayed a lack of knowledge of Elvis' cultural status and quite frankly EAP and LP aside, her product was consistently poor.

Look at the work that Geller did for the label in the ensuing years after her departure. Something like the two Rocker volumes, the care in assembling the material and the selection of the covers. Look that Geller went out and got Peter Guralnick to pen the notes on Reconsider Baby and The Complete Sun Sessions. Just look at the idea that Reconsider Baby was a blues album. Elvis' status as a blues singer was secret knowledge among Elvis' most diehard fans and knowledgeable critics but nobody in the rest of world had any clue? There's just a knowledge and passion for the music as well as an idea of what an LP should be and that it could say something that is not there in any package that Deary created.

Also it was on Geller's watch that one of the most important moves in posthumous Elvis history occurred, when RCA issued Elvis, Elvis Presley, Elvis' Christmas Album and Elvis' Golden Records in original mono sound instead of the reprocessed stereo in which they had been solely available for years (before Deary). Forget all the recent remasters. This was the sonic upgrade of all time. Those reprocessed stereo songs sounded horrible and that was how Elvis' 50s tracks sounded for almost two decades. Growing up with the reprocessed tracks, I accepted them. After listening to the original mono, it was like WTF when I went back and listened to the reprocessed stuff. RCA was the first major label to move "backwards" on a project like this (at least that's what the trades said at the time) and they've never looked back.

Sun Feb 04, 2007 4:26 pm

I don't know about "ahead of it's time" or even what that means. If it is supposed to mean that it was the first multi-LP box set by a rock/pop artist, I don't think that it's true. The previous year (1979), "The Complete Buddy Holly" was released as a 5 or 6 LP set (I can't remember which). I don't know how commercially successful it was but it probably didn't do too much since it hasn't been released on CD.

Sun Feb 04, 2007 6:25 pm

I enjoyed (and still enjoy) everything Joan Deary had a hand in much more than I ever enjoyed anything Gellar did.

Joan Deary had a producer's credit on the original Gold Vol. 5, but I can tell you from conversations I had with her that the track selection was largely Gellar's.
Why aren't some of the Gold records that should have been there NOT there?? Because Gregg Gellar didn't like them.

Apparently Ernst doesn't either because Gold Vol 5 is still lacking. Try again, Ernst.

Sun Feb 04, 2007 7:17 pm

ronnyg wrote:I don't know about "ahead of it's time" or even what that means. If it is supposed to mean that it was the first multi-LP box set by a rock/pop artist, I don't think that it's true. The previous year (1979), "The Complete Buddy Holly" was released as a 5 or 6 LP set (I can't remember which). I don't know how commercially successful it was but it probably didn't do too much since it hasn't been released on CD.


Of course EAP or the Buddy Holly box sets weren't the first multi-LP box sets by rock/pop artists. The Buddy Holly box set was superb as it brought together everything Holly had recorded (almost that is). The sound quality was also very good. However, apart from a few home recordings and other rarities the material had already been released previously. EAP had almost 100% unreleased and hard to find material in it but not really any new songs (just one actually). That's what made it special. The cd release of the Holly box set is long overdue. I believe there has been some legal problems that have hindred it's release on cd. They should include in it all the early material without the later overdubs and also the few home recordings that have only been available on bootlegs.

Sun Feb 04, 2007 9:12 pm

Perhaps you can enlighten me, Marko. Which pop/rock artist had a box prior to this (since you indicated that obviously others came before)? I think that the Dylan box from 1985 was the one that spawned the slew of boxes ever since as it was very successful. If I remember correctly, Springsteen came out with one shortly after that (a live set) and it went from there.

Sun Feb 04, 2007 9:42 pm

ronnyg wrote:Perhaps you can enlighten me, Marko. Which pop/rock artist had a box prior to this (since you indicated that obviously others came before)? I think that the Dylan box from 1985 was the one that spawned the slew of boxes ever since as it was very successful. If I remember correctly, Springsteen came out with one shortly after that (a live set) and it went from there.


Just of the top of my head, The Beatles released a couple of box sets in the late 70's and early 80's. Also, Elvis himself had a box set released in '70 (Worldwide 50 Gold Award Hits Vol 1) and in '75 by Reader's Digest. I'm sure there are others as well but you're certainly correct in that it wasn't as common back then. The cd era certainly changed that.

Mon Feb 05, 2007 1:45 am

JerryNodak wrote:I enjoyed (and still enjoy) everything Joan Deary had a hand in much more than I ever enjoyed anything Gellar did.

All I can say is ... "wow."

JerryNodak wrote:Joan Deary had a producer's credit on the original Gold Vol. 5, but I can tell you from conversations I had with her that the track selection was largely Gellar's. Why aren't some of the Gold records that should have been there NOT there?? Because Gregg Gellar didn't like them.

Interesting. Gregg Geller's name is nowhere on that LP. Howvever, what essential tracks are missing? The June 1970 recordings on 45 that went gold seem to be ignored, but perhaps the goal was to avoid the MOR direction Elvis took in the 1970s. The ten included were:

Suspicious Minds
Kentucky Rain
In The Ghetto
Clean Up Your Own Backyard
If I Can Dream
Burning Love
If You Talk In Your Sleep
For The Heart
Moody Blue
Way Down

Looks as close to "all killer, no filler" as can be.