All posts with more than 3000 Hits, prior to 2008

new ftd unchained

Sat Jan 13, 2007 9:36 pm

... Blimey! Both tapes have the same age and source.

Baxter and friends are fans. Reidel an employee with hearing

problems and no love for Elvis' music.

Sat Jan 13, 2007 9:37 pm

[quote="frus75"]DALLAS and birmingham ARE ALSO one day apart

Do you think that Dallas and Birmingham are the SAME PLACE?
I was talking about the same place, dude...

And man, if today FTD publish the Birmingham show in worse sound quality then 2001 lebel did 10 years ago, you'd be happy about that?

Sat Jan 13, 2007 9:37 pm

frus75 wrote:so fb moody blue, and the new ftd, being from the same venue, and only one day apart, should sound the same?

Before any professional mixing was done and providing there was no major tweaking of the soundboard between the two shows -- yes (or remotely close).

Sat Jan 13, 2007 9:40 pm

KB wrote:
frus75 wrote:DALLAS and birmingham ARE ALSO one day apart

Do you think that Dallas and Birmingham are the SAME PLACE?
I was talking about the same place, dude...

And man, if today FTD publish the Birmingham show in worse sound quality then 2001 lebel did 10 years ago, you'd be happy about that?


to answer your polite question, this dude (whatever is it) doesn't think dallas and birmingham are the same place.

Sat Jan 13, 2007 9:42 pm

Rob wrote:
frus75 wrote:so fb moody blue, and the new ftd, being from the same venue, and only one day apart, should sound the same?

Before any professional mixing was done and providing there was no major tweaking of the soundboard between the two shows -- yes (or remotely close).


I don't like ftd work on soundboards at all, I was just asking as I haven't been able to listen to unchained yet.

I was told by a so called soundexpert that fb didn't do a proper remastering, just the minimum to pass the tape to a cd. So different from DAE, that used so many artifacts...
Is it true?

Sat Jan 13, 2007 9:43 pm

frus75 wrote:so fb moody blue, and the new ftd, being from the same venue, and only one day apart, should sound the same? So the first question to judge the situation would be: is the mix the same? Because we can't altere the mix of a mono tape.


Basically the soundboard was roughly adjusted for each tour and the sound is pretty similar. Compare - for example - April-May 75 recordings - the mixes are very similar. Then big difference in May- June 75, but again for this tour mixes are similar for every venue. Etc...

It can be expected that the overall soud picture for 20.02.77 and 21.02.77 recordings will be not too much different.
Last edited by deadringer on Sat Jan 13, 2007 9:46 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Sat Jan 13, 2007 9:45 pm

KB wrote:
frus75 wrote:DALLAS and birmingham ARE ALSO one day apart

Do you think that Dallas and Birmingham are the SAME PLACE?
I was talking about the same place, dude...

And man, if today FTD publish the Birmingham show in worse sound quality then 2001 lebel did 10 years ago, you'd be happy about that?


this damn dude forgot to answer the second question. They already did it with pittsburgh 76, so I won't be surprised. And I won't be happy (I never told I was happy, just wanted to separate "bitching" from wise dissertion, as I always want to leatn more about the mastering technics, that sound like chinese to most of us here on the forum).

Sat Jan 13, 2007 9:47 pm

so deadringer, the mix depended on tour and not on venue? that's why for example the electric piano is so prominent on dec 76 tour?

and the next qustion ( i am in an inquisitive mood today 8) ): why did they alter the mix of the soundboard each tour?

Sat Jan 13, 2007 9:48 pm

frus 75 wrote: to answer your polite question, this dude (whatever is it) doesn't think dallas and birmingham are the same place.[/quote]

Sorry, i didnt want to be offending. I think mr. Ger Rijff got the point with his post above. :wink: But, when I try to say that 'I'm beachin' then :lol:

Sat Jan 13, 2007 9:54 pm

no friend, you didn't ofend me, I was just being a polite country boy. I wasn't implying you were bitching, I just wanted to make sure if AGAIN a ftd soundboard was going to be a dispointment soundwise.

Sat Jan 13, 2007 10:08 pm

frus75 wrote:so deadringer, the mix depended on tour and not on venue? that's why for example the electric piano is so prominent on dec 76 tour?

and the next qustion ( i am in an inquisitive mood today 8) ): why did they alter the mix of the soundboard each tour?


1 . the mix depended on aussie Bruce Jacksons mood I guess :-). But if you will play mentioned April-May 75 soundboards, you will hear basically the same mixes with the same instruments and voices prominent or missing.
Also Dec. 76 tapes (2) have similar mix. Same goes for Tahoe 74 tapes etc...

2. I have no clue. But sometimes soundboards were recorded binaural - and there WAS REASON for it, like Orlando 77 tape with piano very prominent or March 76 stereo tapes with Burton upfront.

Sun Jan 14, 2007 12:34 am

Playing my copy right now....Blueberry hill....very enjoyable cd !!!

Mon Jan 15, 2007 9:49 am

frus75 wrote:I was told by a so called soundexpert that FB didn't do a proper remastering, just the minimum to pass the tape to a cd. So different from DAE, that used so many artifacts. Is it true?


I prefer the uncompromised source any time of the day. Listen to the old DAE releases, they are all drenched in echo. The damage is done and can't be reversed! Less is more...
Last edited by thenexte on Tue Feb 13, 2007 8:12 pm, edited 1 time in total.

new ftd unchained

Mon Jan 15, 2007 9:55 am

... blessings from my boss, thenexte. He wasnt too keen on all

the added echo on DAE either.

Mon Jan 15, 2007 11:06 am

I have just listened to this release and sound generally is "GOOD!" apart from 'scratchy bits' on "where no-one stands alone" track! terrible!and compared to baxters moody blue & other great performances incredible!!! :oops:
Elvis sounds ok-'straight', not slurred and clear. however sometimes he drops lyrics or sometimes sounds less far forward in the soundboard mix vocally? mostly though he sounds strong-how great thou art and mountain being good examples, however Jim Dandy won't like his version of 'little sister'! :wink: :roll: also with good sounding 2 tracks also from Columbia on 18.2.77 and a total running time of only 64 minutes.... (compared to recent boot RED HOT IN VEGAS @ 79 MINUTES) means that we could have had another 15 minutes of other tracks from 18th Feb or other dates say another 5-6 tracks!!!! however this isn't to slam this FTD release, just to say it could quite easily have been better mastered and contain more tracks- nevertheless mostly instruments piano,drums and Elvis's voice + J.D.Sumner are up-front in mix and clear sounding. Quite a GOOD release I'm currently enjoying listening too as he is having fun and that 1 liner of singing 'MY WISH CAME TRUE' is cute! :roll: couldn't hear this Charlotte show as clearly ever before! :lol:

Mon Jan 15, 2007 12:12 pm

thenexte wrote:
frus75 wrote:I was told by a so called soundexpert that FB didn't do a proper remastering, just the minimum to pass the tape to a cd. So different from DAE, that used so many artifacts. Is it true?


I prefer the uncompromised source any time of the day. Listen to the old DAE releases, they are all draining in echo. The damage is done and can't be reversed! Less is more...


But still many people rate old time are not forgotten as the best sounding boot ever...are they wrong?

new ftd unchained

Mon Jan 15, 2007 12:29 pm

... yes, they are. But dont ask which one is best / better.

Its been too long since Ive listened to any old sbs, by whatever

label. Aint my cup o' tea. And it will never be.

Tue Feb 13, 2007 7:23 am

I suppose if I got to see him even once, I, too, might be satiated, Ger...

Just got this release awhile back and haven't had a chance to comment enough on it. Here are some of my observations:

Image

A lot of bandwidth has been given over to the apparent errors of Mr. / Ms. ( :lol: ) Reidel, to a fault, so I won't retrace that here, except to say that overall, "Unchained Melody" is still an interesting release, and yes, quite listenable, particularly once it gets going. By most accounts, it will rank on the lower tier of FTDs, but a good deal of the material should be given a leg up over anything on "Dragonheart," "Closing Night" or "Takin' Tahoe," arguably.

Yes, the opening tracks were not recorded and it can take some getting used to hearing the album start with "Love Me," but I've grown to like it. For one, there's such a ritualistic aspect to his concerts, as the repetition is somewhat akin (with no offense intended) to the feeling of a Catholic Mass to the die-hard concert fan.

But to have this disc missing "See See Rider" (which I never really tire of) and the over-familiar "I Got A Woman / Amen" medley (complete with divebomber routine) is obviously not a bad thing, as it gets you into the core of the concert quicker. "Love Me" here serves as a warm-up of sorts.

It's rough going in the beginning tracks, but also more than passable to those who can appreciate his '77 style. It's all far from essential and yes, you do hear those throat "icicles." This is far from his best work but it's also not like the import "The Bicentennial Experience," of the prior year, which I find heartbreakingly unlistenable by and large. These, by contrast, are passable tracks.

But if you're not a fan of '77 ("late-period") Elvis, these versions won't convert you, as they're very similiar to the sound we know on the post-humous "Elvis In Concert" double- LP. "It's Now or Never" is well-done but a ringer for what we know already. "Jailhouse Rock" is better performed here than on the "EIC" LP, but that's only relative, as the "Sha-Na-Na"-style arrangement of the late '70s version never did it justice, and likewise with his late-period "Little Sister" whose beat or arrangement can be gratingly lumpy compared to the more wired and rockin' original or 1970 versions...


"Fairytale" is pedestrian but acceptable. It's one of those songs that he could always put over with little effort. But to fence-sitters, this is material not far removed from his soundtrack dogs of the '60s.

"You Gave Me A Mountain" was always something he pulled off, or so it seems but the "ummpff" factor here is much more apparent. Off the top of my head, I can't recall any bad versions of this song.

The soon-to-be epitath-like "My Way" is well-done, with a more apparent synth-sound than we are used to.

Image
The title-track takes shape, Montgomery, Alabama, Feb. 16, 1977; courtesy E. In Norway

But highlights are indeed to be found on "Unchained Melody," finally kicking in as the CD progresses: "How Great Thou Art" is, of course, a touchstone for Elvis throughout his life and this version puts you on notice that he's getting in gear at last. "Hurt" (with the usual reprise) is top-notch here, with a slightly different depth to his vocal on the first ending that is refreshing to hear.

"Hound Dog" is the usual throwaway, but the tantalizing touch of 1957's "My Wish Came True" (!) that comes as a one-liner in the dialogue that follows, is a real kick. But if you blink, you'll miss it, as comes quick and goes on track 12 at 1:36. Mercifully, FTD thought better of actually listing this as a separate track !

Given the slogging the collector label has taken for some of the audio gaffes (mostly negligible or so I try to tell myself!), that's probably a good thing. But what you hear of it makes you realize that he could have done a decent version of it and how much poorer his concerts were (relatively) for not indulging his deep catalog of songs.

Image
Charlotte, North Carolina, February 21, 1977 (courtesy E. In Norway)

The "Moody Blue" LP version of the title track ("Unchained Melody") is here undubbed, not for the first time either but in its rightful home. "Can't Help Falling in Love" follows next and unless you're heartless, there's still something about this song when it's done effectively, which was most of the time. The piano is rather pronounced, as it is throughout this show, but I rather like the touch.

But wait, there's another eight tracks so the "show" is not really over as we switch to some meaty stuff from other dates: "Moody Blue" in a live rendition that was a revelation when I first heard it on bootleg, is here, including an aborted version a few tracks before it. For those who have missed it, this alone will sell the disc to those who've missed out to this point.

"Blueberry Hill" is a welcome, bluesy touch - with the King at the keyboards no less. I've also heard this on boot, so the impact is lessened but to have it out officially, as with "Moody Blue" and others, is worthwhile.

"Love Letters" is nice, if ragged but far from being "played out" to these ears. The much-discussed and to-my-ears phenomenal take on "Where No One Stands Alone" is arguably the stand-out track - and in fine fashion, yet only to be marred by the increasingly ham-handed Lene Reidel. Thankfully, the bootleg version safely resides in my collection, along with JLGB's impressive cleaned-up version presented to us via MP-3. But forgetting the sound for a minute, I consider this one of his last great live tunes. The energy and heart he summons on this track is worth the price of the disc if you can get past the brief mastering flubs.

"Release Me" here has a fresh, lower-key, more country feel and of course, is by '77, more of an old-friend resurfacing to the set once more. It's ragged but endearing as a result.

"Trying To Get To You" as performed in '77 remains to me the perfect the rebuke to those who too casually dismiss Elvis' singing ability at age 42, and this version from Columbia, South Carolina also does little to disappoint. In the best tradition of blues music, which so often celebrates world-weariness, experience and rough edges, Elvis battles through this song almost on the level of his later '77 TV Concert version. You can't do wrong to have this on this set.

Image
21 Feb. 1977 courtesy Elvis In Norway

Which leads us to another by now well-known-to-FECC-ears (thank you, import world!) live version of Lowell Folsom's Reconsider Baby" from '77. Yet it's great to have in this setting and officially released. It's ragged but raw as with the best of so many blues. It's a treat to hear Elvis' familar acoustic guitar driving the beat home as if it's 1960 once again.

As with any FTD that chooses to end without "Can't Help Falling In Love" at the end (such as the very effective use of "I'm Leavin'" on "Southern Nights"), there's a nice, fresh sense to having a different song end the "show."

And on this one, it's "Why Me Lord" from Charlotte on the 21st of February. It closes with his boilerplate "anytime you want us to back sometime" line but we know as listeners that Dixie was not to see his likes again.

There's something bittersweet about closing with "Why Me Lord?" (even with some of the goofing around) because we've just listened to the King effectively demonstrate that he indeed needed help ..devine help...any help, to stop the now inevitable end of the line he had reached. Ernst Jorgensen has managed to cobble together an effective concert from '77, full of examples of his decline but also his still-rich voice and the often-present heroism (if not bad judgement) of a man compelled to sing on stage virtually to his last breath. Fans who enjoy the whole span of his career will want to add this to the collection - as usual.


**********************************
Related (other) "Unchained Melody" threads...!:

http://www.elvis-collectors.com/forum/v ... =unchained

http://www.elvis-collectors.com/forum/v ... =unchained

http://www.elvis-collectors.com/forum/v ... =unchained


http://www.elvis-collectors.com/forum/v ... =unchained

http://www.elvis-collectors.com/forum/v ... =unchained

http://www.elvis-collectors.com/forum/v ... =unchained
Last edited by Gregory Nolan Jr. on Tue Feb 13, 2007 8:25 am, edited 3 times in total.

Tue Feb 13, 2007 8:14 am

Very nice post Greg !

The type I enjoy reading.

Seemed to me when listening to this show that Elvis was rushing the songs a tad bit. Like Fairytale, really fast tempo to it. But still managed a good show. I've really been warming up to the Unchained Melody on here. Quickly becoming a favorite of mine.

Tue Feb 13, 2007 7:01 pm

deadringer wrote:
frus75 wrote:so deadringer, the mix depended on tour and not on venue? that's why for example the electric piano is so prominent on dec 76 tour?

and the next qustion ( i am in an inquisitive mood today 8) ): why did they alter the mix of the soundboard each tour?


1 . the mix depended on aussie Bruce Jacksons mood I guess :-). But if you will play mentioned April-May 75 soundboards, you will hear basically the same mixes with the same instruments and voices prominent or missing.
Also Dec. 76 tapes (2) have similar mix. Same goes for Tahoe 74 tapes etc...

2. I have no clue. But sometimes soundboards were recorded binaural - and there WAS REASON for it, like Orlando 77 tape with piano very prominent or March 76 stereo tapes with Burton upfront.


Wouldn't the mix be determined by the acoustics of the venue.

That's the primary purpose of a mixing board :D Not to produce recordings.

Tue Feb 13, 2007 7:21 pm

Greg, That was a lucid, intelligent review and I enjoyed reading it :!:

Thanks for taking the effort and time to write it. :D

Tue Feb 13, 2007 8:25 pm

Now if he'd only post a review on the Sullivan DVD's....

Tue Feb 13, 2007 10:32 pm

Gregory Nolan Jr. wrote:

"Fairytale" is pedestrian but acceptable. It's one of those songs that he could always put over with little effort. But to fence-sitters, this is material not far removed from his soundtrack dogs of the '60s.


This must be a mistake. This is regarded by most as a fairly good quality song and I get asked to play it at Elvis discos a lot.

Fri Feb 16, 2007 9:04 am

Tony, I meant only those who are predisposed to dislike '70s Elvis. Personally, I'm generally okay with it.

I actually think it's a good song, depending on my mood. I heard this album yet again (the first few tracks) and have to say that "Fairy Tale" and others are quite good, icicles and all.


(And check your PM's, mate....)


Rob, I'll put that on my list to review...right after I get to my long-awaited take on "Chaos in College Park." :lol:

I'm serious.

But I will get to the Sullivan sets. Think of it as a way to bring focus onto a neglected set.

Fri Feb 16, 2007 9:13 am

Gregory Nolan Jr. wrote:
Rob, I'll put that on my list to review...right after I get to my long-awaited take on "Chaos in College Park." :lol:


Expect the un-expected :lol: