All posts with more than 3000 Hits, prior to 2008

Mon Dec 04, 2006 5:13 pm

The only ones Elvis did better ( IMO):
LONG TALL SALLY ( 1970)
I GOT A WOMAN ( 1969)
sincerely
LIOR

Mon Dec 04, 2006 10:09 pm

Personally I prefer the later live versions of How Great Thou Art to the original. Though most 70's versions of A Big Hunk O Love are very good and Elvis enthusiasm was there, they do not beat the 50's recording.

Mon Dec 04, 2006 10:19 pm

Denman wrote:Personally I prefer the later live versions of How Great Thou Art to the original.


As ekenee has stated also... I would suggest Elvis' performances of How Great Thou Art from 1970 on to 1974 are much more powerful and dynamic in their delivery than the studio track... evidence to support this is Elvis' grammy nod for his 1974 Memphis recording. But the evidence goes beyond the award... it's difficult to compare his live rendition to the studio cut... two entirely different birds...but I can honestly say that I personally prefer hearing the 1970-74 performances to the 1966 recording.

Mon Dec 04, 2006 11:05 pm

That's All Righ from Elvis In Concert '77. Which are those that spring to mind right now.[/quote]


are you kidding me on with this elvis 77 as good as elvis 54 :shock: :shock: :shock:

Re: 50's/60's songs Elvis did better in the 70's

Tue Dec 05, 2006 1:37 am

JerryNodak wrote:I don't dismiss them.

Jerry, when you state "I never could stand his stuff" you dismiss ALL the work Richard created at Specialty in the 1950s. Which, if you like rock and roll, is simply incongruous!

If you meant something else, you didn't post it.

dreambear wrote:... just like he would have a hard time to beat a performance like "It´s midnight" in 1955!

Elvis wouldn't have had any trouble with the song at SUN, as Sam Phillips would've likely rejected it before turning on the tape machine.

Tue Dec 05, 2006 3:53 am

The troublesome word here is "improved". I agree with the consenus that Elvis, except for the '68 TV show which is not the 1970s, never improved his '50s classics on stage in the 1970s. Although, I agree with the poster that mentioned how close "I Got a Woman" came in 1969/1970 even that fine version is eclipsed by the live '50s and 1961 versions. However, I do think early on Elvis gave exceptional performances of the majority of his '50s classics and even reinvented a few along the way. "All Shook Up", "Blue Suede Shoes", "I Got a Woman" and even "Hound Dog" all received very exciting treatments early on. As late as 1972 he was peforming "A Big Hunk O' Love" with panache.

I don't think that Elvis was capable in the 1970s of surpassing his early standards particularly the rockers because he wasn't in the same place anymore. First off we know from all the literature that his mind moved through things very quickly. Not only had Elvis been there and done that on most of these songs, he was far removed from the initial conditions that created them. We all rave and justly so about the Sullivan performances. But the oldest Elvis song performed on any of those shows was "Heartbreak Hotel" which was a few days short of a year old when Elvis sang it on the show in January 1957. "Don't Be Cruel" which Elvis performed brilliantly on the last show was barely six months old. By 1969, they were 13 years old. By 1972, they were 16 and Elvis had performed them multiple hundreds of time. In the '50s these tunes had novelty and freshness to Elvis; in the 1970s they did not.

Pete has talked about that rasp on "Big Hunk O' Love" and also earlier hits like "Jailhouse Rock". This is an effect, Elvis seemed unwilling or unable to use after 1960, perhaps because of the strain on his voice. It was essential to some of those rockers. He developed other techniques to handle later rockers but without that rasp "Jailhouse Rock" is just not going to be the same.

Also you could argue that the '50s classics are often young men's songs. Again Elvis had moved from that place.

I do think judging from some moments in the 1970 rehearsal versions that Elvis' deeper vocal tones might have benefitted some of his '50s ballads like "Don't" had he chosen to revisit them in a serious manner.

For '60s songs I agree on "How Great Thou Art". It is much better in live performance. "Suspcious Minds" early on and some "Can't Help Falling in Love" do come close to equalling the majesty of the original studio performances.

Tue Dec 05, 2006 5:35 am

likethebike wrote:
Pete has talked about that rasp on "Big Hunk O' Love" and also earlier hits like "Jailhouse Rock". This is an effect, Elvis seemed unwilling or unable to use after 1960, perhaps because of the strain on his voice. It was essential to some of those rockers. He developed other techniques to handle later rockers but without that rasp "Jailhouse Rock" is just not going to be the same.


The rasp or snarl is mostly absent in the early/mid 60's, but there's a few numbers where he employs it: It Feels So Right; Reconsider Baby; I Want You With Me. If I'm not mistaken it makes it's first re-appearance on the Big Boss Man/High Heel Sneakers single (particularly the latter). Fans at the time must have felt HHS was manna from Heaven. I sure would've!

Tue Dec 05, 2006 5:53 am

i'm really not fond of the studio master of how great thou art. thanks for bringing it up. it's imo, kinda boring and not up to the emotional standards i would expect from him.

it doesn't get better than that one version where he kept singing the bridge for a live version that was about 8 minutes long. that's my favorite version. all the live versions are better, imo.

Tue Dec 05, 2006 6:00 am

While he does employ the rasp on portions of those 1960s songs, he never uses it on an entire song the way he did in the 1950s. Also what he does on "Big Boss Man" is not exactly like what he did in the '50s which was to push his voice just short of a scream yet sing and never lose the melody. It was a startling effect.

Tue Dec 05, 2006 6:54 am

likethebike wrote:Pete has talked about that rasp on "Big Hunk O' Love" and also earlier hits like "Jailhouse Rock". This is an effect, Elvis seemed unwilling or unable to use after 1960, perhaps because of the strain on his voice. It was essential to some of those rockers. He developed other techniques to handle later rockers but without that rasp "Jailhouse Rock" is just not going to be the same.


I would say to a certain extent this "rasp" was evident during the 1968 special when Elvis performed many of his 1956-57 hits.

Tue Dec 05, 2006 11:26 am

And 69 to 70 too

And i can hear some of that rasp in some songs in Opening night 1972. I love it, it adds more dramatization to his stage presence and his voice.

Tue Dec 05, 2006 11:28 am

elvis-fan wrote:
likethebike wrote:Pete has talked about that rasp on "Big Hunk O' Love" and also earlier hits like "Jailhouse Rock". This is an effect, Elvis seemed unwilling or unable to use after 1960, perhaps because of the strain on his voice. It was essential to some of those rockers. He developed other techniques to handle later rockers but without that rasp "Jailhouse Rock" is just not going to be the same.


I would say to a certain extent this "rasp" was evident during the 1968 special when Elvis performed many of his 1956-57 hits.
Good thing he suffered from those colds in 68-69.. :lol:

Tue Dec 05, 2006 11:31 am

Yeah, good comment there JLGB :D

Re: 50's/60's songs Elvis did better in the 70's

Tue Dec 05, 2006 2:11 pm

drjohncarpenter wrote:
JerryNodak wrote:I don't dismiss them.

Jerry, when you state "I never could stand his stuff" you dismiss ALL the work Richard created at Specialty in the 1950s. Which, if you like rock and roll, is simply incongruous!

If you meant something else, you didn't post it.

dreambear wrote:... just like he would have a hard time to beat a performance like "It´s midnight" in 1955!

Elvis wouldn't have had any trouble with the song at SUN, as Sam Phillips would've likely rejected it before turning on the tape machine.


Perhaps no trouble, but he developed as a ballad singer. To my ears, songs like "I love you because" sounds a bit immature. He would probably had done that song in a smoother way in 1962 or something.

Regards from a rainy Sweden!

Tue Dec 05, 2006 3:13 pm

Trying To Get To You is my first choice for improvement in the 70s, particularly in '77.
I love the 77 style of That's All Right but I couldn't say it bettered the original.
Lawdy Miss Clawdy is a challenge and a close call.
Sadly not many others got the respect they deserved
rick

Tue Dec 05, 2006 3:54 pm

"Blue Suede Shoes" in the early 70s was an improvement – over his 1960 studio version.

Tue Dec 05, 2006 5:26 pm

Torben! The 1960 soundtrack recording of Blue Suede Shoes from G I Blues was recorded that way, I think, because Elvis was supposed to impersonate Elvis Presley - Blue Suede Shoes on the jukebox.
Elvis was not portraying himself in the movie.
Thus that diffferent approach to the song. Still I think the G I Blues version of Blue Suede Shoes has it's own charm.

Sat Dec 09, 2006 4:55 am

Elvis' Babe wrote:i'm really not fond of the studio master of how great thou art. thanks for bringing it up. it's imo, kinda boring and not up to the emotional standards i would expect from him.


I'm pretty sure this is the studio performance that has been commented on by those at the session that Elvis almost went white after giving his emotional all to the song.

Sat Dec 09, 2006 4:56 am

Elvis' Babe wrote:i'm really not fond of the studio master of how great thou art. thanks for bringing it up. it's imo, kinda boring and not up to the emotional standards i would expect from him.


I'm pretty sure this is the studio performance that has been commented on by those at the session that Elvis almost went white after giving his emotional all to the song.

Sat Dec 09, 2006 7:31 am

The original studio version of "How Great Thou Art" is more refined. I think it's the ultimate rendition of that song by Elvis.

As usual: I am with the Doc. I can't think of a single number that Elvis performed better in the 70's than he did when he originally tackled them in the 50's and 60's. That says a lot.

Also: I think Elvis had his more melancholic 70's voice by 1966. Listen to "Indescribably Blue". It's like a 70's song and a 70's performance -- only done with more texture, control and restraint.

That aside.........

I don't think anyone but the Elvis of 1976 could imbue the best of those Jungle Room numbers with the same level of passion and depth. There is truly something special in every decade.

Sat Dec 09, 2006 7:20 pm

Elvis was never able to better any of his 1950's or '60's recordings in the 1970's.....it is as simple as that!

There are a handful that rank as a legit performance and not a throwaway such as some of the Big Hunk Of Love & Trying To Get To You performances. Most all of the How Great Thou Art performances are the only ones that come close to Elvis injecting that Presley magic.

In 1970 if Elvis had finished a master to Baby Let's Play House when he was rehearsing for TTWIS it would have been awlful close to a '68 performance of the song; there is something magic about that short rehearsal that leaves me longing for more......you may get religion........

Sat Dec 09, 2006 9:12 pm

These are the songs that are performed better in the live years 1969–1977:

Trying to Get to You
That’s All Right
Blue Suede Shoes
I Got a Woman
Long Tall Sally
Love Me Tender
A Big Hunk o’ Love (maybe)

Can’t Help Falling in Love
Are You Lonesome Tonight?
What’d I say
How Great Thou Art
Big Boss Man (maybe; different approach; some like it better, some don’t)

These are the ones that immediately spring to mind. There are others, where the live version(s) come close or even surpass the studio master, such as "Don’t Cry, Daddy", "In the Ghetto", and "Rubberneckin’".

"How Great Thou Art" remains the biggest improvement live, not counting the mediocre official 1971 version.

Per

Sat Dec 09, 2006 9:27 pm

Elvis' Babe wrote:'m not a only in the '50s/'68 ignoramous, so that could be a part of it.


Evidently not: You're an "only in the '70s" ignoramus.

While I have a great deal of affection for most of the performances you have spotlighted, Elvis' Babe, there is no question that Elvis performed those songs better in the 50's and 60's. It's a shame he didn't at least perform his back catalogue with the good care and taste shown in the EOT rendition of "Lawdy Miss Clawdy". It isn't a match for the '68 performances, but it has a nice gospel/pop flavour, allowing it to blend nicely with Elvis' vocal abilities at the time, and the live set itself. While it might have been unreasonable to expect Elvis to rasp through his classic songs, he could at least have shown an EOT level of commitment more often.

Sat Dec 09, 2006 9:47 pm

Having seen the kingsisalive's post I have to agree Elvis did Big Boss Man better (yeah I like it), Love me tender in 1968 (I never really liked the original thát much, somehow), Blue Suede Shoes (I always skipped it on the secondtonone cd) and I got a woman. (1970 version)

Sat Dec 09, 2006 9:59 pm

Cryogenic wrote:While it might have been unreasonable to expect Elvis to rasp through his classic songs, he could at least have shown an EOT level of commitment more often.


Amen!!