All posts with more than 3000 Hits, prior to 2008

Thu Nov 23, 2006 4:14 am

shanebrown wrote:Well, from the point of view of Hitchcock Rope was an experiment with the long shots and all and The Trouble With Harry is now considered a classic. I'm not really up enough on Dylan to comment.

However is you excise the leftover albums from the Presley catalogue of the 1970s then Elvis would come over as a much more consistent performer. The artistic achievement of each album would have remained high and therefore would have been treated with more respect. We all know the the Stax sessions in December 73 should have sold like hot cakes but didnt. They had commercial success stamped all over them - a good mix of good songs, from different genres, sung well, coherently released. BUT any new fans or interested parties that picked up TTWII or Elvis Country would have seen a decline in standard through Now, The 71 Christmas album, Fool, Love Letters and Raised On Rock to the point where they probably decided that Elvis had obviously let it go again. Whereas he hadn't and was putting out enough songs to come up with good albums but the quanity of them meant left-overs and half-finished songs to be released. Without the release of those albums, yes, some great numbers would have remained unreleased. But thats the way it is for all artists whether it is Elvis, Sinatra, Cash, Bobby darin and so on.
I wish I could have said it like you! Thanks!!! :)

Thu Nov 23, 2006 4:57 am

Claus wrote:I think Sony/BMG should release Elvis' albums as two-fers with bonus tracks (singles). Capitol released the Beach Boys catalog as two-fers in the early 90's and they have been in print ever since.


Hey! That's an original idea!

Why don't we start with the soundtrack albums?

They could couple together Harum Scarum/Girl Happy or perhaps Viva Las Vegas/Roustabout.


Should sell heaps and heaps!

Thu Nov 23, 2006 5:07 am

:lol: ..Happened and did not work out Claus!

Thu Nov 23, 2006 5:46 am

shanebrown wrote:Thanks for the compliment JLGB :o)
Big help for me! :)

Thu Nov 23, 2006 11:31 am

JLGB wrote::lol: ..Happened and did not work out Claus!


When did it happen? The only two-fers I can think of are the Double Features series (missing the bonus tracks), the Promised Land and FEPB remasters (which were missing 1 or 2 tracks) and the new Elvis Christmas cd.

As Shane pointed out, the double features series didn't sell because they were full-priced cd's and the material was below average for the most part.
How well do you honestly expect Frankie and Johnny/Paradise Hawaiian Style or Spinout/Double Trouble to sell?

Thu Nov 23, 2006 12:06 pm

Fact is they already upgraded the original abums in the 90s and early 00s. No need to have pulled them from circulation. Instead they could have promoted them! Every hits compilation at least should have had one of the those printed inserts detailing the original album collection. No no, BMG would rather just dump them into the market and expect people to know what they are.

Thu Nov 23, 2006 12:20 pm

I would point out that the movie doubles were poorly promoted. The liner notes were poor. The sound was often poor especially on the first batch of releases. When Capitol did its great Beach Boys' reissues, they added not subtracted bonus songs making a decent CD length. They also had terrific liner notes that took you longer than 30 seconds to finish. And they also had unbelievable sound (for the time). I was flabbergasted when I got Viva Las Vegas/Roustabout at the poor sound. It was echoey and flat. Even the covers were shoddy.

What's more the series was thrown indiscriminately together. For instance Viva Las Vegas deserved its own release similar to the one we have on FTD today. The title song has one of the heaviest name recognitions of any Elvis song. The movie, which was reviewed positively at least twice in Entertainment Weekly in the early 1990s as well as being listed in the magazine's list of essential home movie, was one of the most popular and well known Elvis vehicles. Fans of general 60s pop culture who enjoy AM as much as Elvis enjoy the movie. Plus, it's a very fine record with some of the best music in any Elvis movie including the eye opening duet with A/M on "You're the Boss", "What'd I Say", "C'mon Everybody" and the title track. Granted it was never an album back in the day but BMG could have offered a corrective.

I would also ask what does not sell mean in BMG's universe? Most of these albums stayed in print for almost ten years. If they moved 15,000 copies that wasn't too bad. If BMG means that they didn't move 200,000 copies I think they're expecting too much. From comments in the media and from BMG executives, BMG seems to want to near contemporary artist numbers from Elvis which to me is wrongheaded. You want to expand the market and you don't have to undervalue but you can't expect an artist who has not recorded in decades to carry your label.

Thu Nov 23, 2006 5:23 pm

Claus wrote:
JLGB wrote::lol: ..Happened and did not work out Claus!


When did it happen? The only two-fers I can think of are the Double Features series
Same here. It was all thrown in at once to complete the catalog...but then pulled as fast.. :? Ernst made up for that blunder with FTD label which BTW was an original idea (very similar) with PD from WWE...Believe IT or NOT!!!

Thu Nov 23, 2006 6:43 pm

Shane:

That's why I do all my music shopping on the Net. Shops (such as they are) are preety worthless here.

Sat Nov 25, 2006 7:20 am

Every hits compilation at least should have had one of the those printed inserts detailing the original album collection.

Seems logical. And there are plenty of other easy and affordable ways for BMG to promote catalogue material.

I would also ask what does not sell mean in BMG's universe? Most of these albums stayed in print for almost ten years. If they moved 15,000 copies that wasn't too bad. If BMG means that they didn't move 200,000 copies I think they're expecting too much. From comments in the media and from BMG executives, BMG seems to want to near contemporary artist numbers from Elvis which to me is wrongheaded. You want to expand the market and you don't have to undervalue but you can't expect an artist who has not recorded in decades to carry your label.

All one has to do is look at other legacy artists that recorded for major labels and the state of their catalogues. Miles Davis (part of Sony/BMG) recorded from the 1950's thru the 1980's on Columbia and the vast majority of his titles are available and certainly a handful do not move over 5000 units a year. Even a huge band such as The Who, does anyone think their early studio albums "A Quick One" and "Sell Out" sell large numbers? Nope, but they remain in print. You think David Bowie's "Space Oddity" moves big numbers? No way. Sony, Universal and EMI aren't in the business of losing money for the sake of keeping a catalogue appropriately represented. They have models that work and a lot of their legacy artists have catalogues that are represented almost fully. In today's music climate, the labels are losing money in many areas, not catalogue. BMG has dropped the ball so badly with their handling of the Elvis catalogue. No one is saying they need every title in print, but there are a solid 15-20 catalogue albums (ranging from studio, live and soundtrack) from Elvis that should be in print with fantastic sound, artwork and liner notes in addition to the boat-load of compilations and hits packages currently flooding the market. Not an unreasonable idea for one of music's greatest and most important talents.