All posts with more than 3000 Hits, prior to 2008

Re: KISS/Elvis

Mon Nov 20, 2006 4:43 am

swingbelly wrote:Ok..being a HUGE Kiss and and an Elvis fan on top of that, I can answer some questions on the KISS side of this discussion.
KISS DID NOT own ANY of these shows that were used in new 3 DVD set. All most all the footage has been around for at least 20 years in the bootleg market. They (KISS) over the years stole or extorted the footage back from the fans. KISS did not pay to have these shows filmed. All of the footage was used from the different locations in house closed circuit feeds. Most places filmed the shows and them offered them up to the band for sale after the show. Most declined and were never seen again. But these managed to hang on somehow over the years and here they are. So, why did it take so long for KISS to release this stuff. Easy, they never had it. Now Paul & Gene's greed are getting to them and see the chance to make some bucks.
Being a huge bootleg freak for KISS, I had EVERYTHING on the DVD's except for like 10 minutes of footage.


Interesting responce! I have often wondered this myself... was Elvis filmed at the venues also... you know BY the venue as you say Kiss were? I have the new DVD set and like you have had most of this footage for YEARS... but the one show on the extra disc from Largo Maryland Dec 20 1977, Elvis also played that same venue on June 27 1976! It would be very interesting to know if Elvis was filmed also. What also made me curious about this Largo location was that I also have bootleg concert from 1978 from the rock group Heart also filmed at this location, filmed by the venue.

JEFF d
EAP fan

Mon Nov 20, 2006 5:34 am

The venue is in Landover, Maryland, and was one of the first to have an in-house video system.

Thanks to that, there is a complete concert from one of the greatest rock tours of all time, captured on video ...

Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band, August 15, 1978:

SUMMERTIME BLUES
BADLANDS
SPIRIT IN THE NIGHT
DARKNESS ON THE EDGE OF TOWN
FACTORY
THE PROMISED LAND
PROVE IT ALL NIGHT
RACING IN THE STREET
THUNDER ROAD
JUNGLELAND

PARADISE BY THE 'C'
4TH OF JULY, ASBURY PARK (SANDY)
SHERRY DARLING
SWEET LITTLE SIXTEEN
GLORIA - NOT FADE AWAY - SHE'S THE ONE
GROWIN' UP
BACKSTREETS
ROSALITA

BORN TO RUN
BECAUSE THE NIGHT

QUARTER TO THREE

Mon Nov 20, 2006 5:40 am

drjohncarpenter wrote:The venue is in Landover, Maryland, and was one of the first to have an in-house video system.

Thanks to that, there is a complete concert from one of the greatest rock tours of all time, captured on video ...

Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band, August 15, 1978


Now see this is very cool!!! Any idea when the video system was installed? Like say before June 27th 1976 hopefully!!

JEFF d
EAP fan

Mon Nov 20, 2006 9:28 am

Don't get mad, Joe. History is what it is. Just as Elvis was who he was. We shouldn't seek to deny it, even if it's rarely what we want or expect.

Joe has issues with the reality of Elvis' 70's decline. He enjoys wearing blinders and blasts anyone for having an open discussion about Elvis's problems. If a statement doesn't come accross as compassionate, it is deemed unacceptable by Joe.

Mon Nov 20, 2006 10:11 am

It's a mistake to get on Elvis or the Colonel about not professionally filming shows. Who in 1972 predicted that one day everyone would have their own personal collection of movies and concerts? We're applying the knowledge of the present to the past which is always a mistake.

I think it's a mistake to say that Elvis did not have artistic vision or control. Plenty of times, he came into the studio with ideas about given pieces. Also his way of creation was to work until you find something. He's in control at all times. Plus, he basically picked all his singles which were his main medium of expression. When his next record was being released, where was his next tour, it's entirely possible and credible that Elvis saw these as business decisions which were for good or bad Parker's territory.

You can say the same thing about the movies and the publishing deal etc. He didn't like these things but resolved himself to their necessity. The poverty Elvis endured growing up can't be left out of assessments of his work and choices. Anything that seemed to guarantee continued wealth was a good thing.

It's also a mistake to say that he didn't have balls. He didn't like confrontation which is something different. He went up against Parker on a number of occasions- GI Blues (This is where the Fox movies came from), the TV show, "Suspicious Minds" and even attempted to fire him once. He didn't back down because he was afraid, he backed down because it seemed to his and his father's limited knowledge the practical thing to do.

You can argue quite fairly that he didn't study enough and that he should have kept a closer eye on business and the impact that business had on his music. You could also argue that he should have networked more to find out just what options were available. You can also argue that Elvis should have controlled himself more so as not to get himself into positions where he was constantly in need of money.

However, it's a mistake to attribute all that to any lack of artistic vision. Arguably, much of Elvis' commercial decline in the 1970s was caused by a rigid adherence to that vision. He was an artist and a conscious artist.

By the way although I disagree with Ger on this point, the scholarship he's done on Elvis and his music attests to his love of Elvis' music and should be appreciated by all fans.

Mon Nov 20, 2006 11:41 am

Another fine post, bike......
With regard Elvis' percieved lack of vision/artistic control, along with your pin point accurate remarks, one must also wonder what the naysayers think happened on the night of 19th August, 1974 at the Las Vegas Hilton??

Mon Nov 20, 2006 2:49 pm

likethebike wrote:By the way although I disagree with Ger on this point, the scholarship he's done on Elvis and his music attests to his love of Elvis' music and should be appreciated by all fans.


I think Ger is more in love with the image of 50's Elvis. He has little understanding of the human being behind that image.
To quote a famous singer, " The image is one thing. The Human being is another."

Mon Nov 20, 2006 3:20 pm

midnightx wrote:
Don't get mad, Joe. History is what it is. Just as Elvis was who he was. We shouldn't seek to deny it, even if it's rarely what we want or expect.

Joe has issues with the reality of Elvis' 70's decline. He enjoys wearing blinders and blasts anyone for having an open discussion about Elvis's problems. If a statement doesn't come accross as compassionate, it is deemed unacceptable by Joe.


I have no problems with admitting EP declined in the later years, that being said, I don't verbally trash him at every opportunity like you and your boss Ger, and I go above and beyond with my responses because of you and your amigo. I can see that Elvis was tormented and yes I do have compassion for him as I would for any human being going through an addiction and mental anguish. Perhaps you and Ger should try showing some compassion once in awhile, really, it's not that difficult.

Mon Nov 20, 2006 3:23 pm

likethebike wrote:It's a mistake to get on Elvis or the Colonel about not professionally filming shows. Who in 1972 predicted that one day everyone would have their own personal collection of movies and concerts? We're applying the knowledge of the present to the past which is always a mistake.

I think it's a mistake to say that Elvis did not have artistic vision or control. Plenty of times, he came into the studio with ideas about given pieces. Also his way of creation was to work until you find something. He's in control at all times. Plus, he basically picked all his singles which were his main medium of expression. When his next record was being released, where was his next tour, it's entirely possible and credible that Elvis saw these as business decisions which were for good or bad Parker's territory.

You can say the same thing about the movies and the publishing deal etc. He didn't like these things but resolved himself to their necessity. The poverty Elvis endured growing up can't be left out of assessments of his work and choices. Anything that seemed to guarantee continued wealth was a good thing.

It's also a mistake to say that he didn't have balls. He didn't like confrontation which is something different. He went up against Parker on a number of occasions- GI Blues (This is where the Fox movies came from), the TV show, "Suspicious Minds" and even attempted to fire him once. He didn't back down because he was afraid, he backed down because it seemed to his and his father's limited knowledge the practical thing to do.

You can argue quite fairly that he didn't study enough and that he should have kept a closer eye on business and the impact that business had on his music. You could also argue that he should have networked more to find out just what options were available. You can also argue that Elvis should have controlled himself more so as not to get himself into positions where he was constantly in need of money.

However, it's a mistake to attribute all that to any lack of artistic vision. Arguably, much of Elvis' commercial decline in the 1970s was caused by a rigid adherence to that vision. He was an artist and a conscious artist.

By the way although I disagree with Ger on this point, the scholarship he's done on Elvis and his music attests to his love of Elvis' music and should be appreciated by all fans.


Well said LTB, though it's gotten to the point where I will disagree with your last couple of lines. He's soured me from appreciating his work and wouldn't get one red cent of my money.

Mon Nov 20, 2006 3:42 pm

Joe Car wrote:Well said LTB, though it's gotten to the point where I will disagree with your last couple of lines. He's soured me from appreciating his work and wouldn't get one red cent of my money.


Hey, Joe... you're cutting off your nose to spite your face. Better contact Michael Jackson's surgeon. :wink:

Mon Nov 20, 2006 4:11 pm

Cryogenic wrote:
Joe Car wrote:Well said LTB, though it's gotten to the point where I will disagree with your last couple of lines. He's soured me from appreciating his work and wouldn't get one red cent of my money.


Hey, Joe... you're cutting off your nose to spite your face. Better contact Michael Jackson's surgeon. :wink:


I know, he might be the worst plastic surgeon that ever lived! :lol:

Mon Nov 20, 2006 5:34 pm

There is obviously an artistic decline during the 70´s. Nevertheless, instead of focusing on the negative side, why not talking too about the highlights? (And there were many.) OK, the Jungleroom sessions may not be as interesting or historical as those at Sun Records, but the way EP took a little honky tonk song like SHE THINKS I STILL CARE and re-invented it (listen to that awesome alternate take 2B) shows that the artist - lazy or not - was still there. Same thing for BRIDGE OVER TROUBLED WATER, MERRY CHRISTMAS BABY (his best Blues performance next to RECONSIDER BABY), AMAZING GRACE, ALWAYS ON MY MIND, SEPARATE WAYS, I´VE GOT A THING ABOUT YOU BABY, PROMISED LAND, TIGER MAN (another Bluesy beauty) or HURT. Live: WALK A MILE IN MY SHOES, NEVER BEEN TO SPAIN or STEAMROLLER BLUES.
Only with those 12 tracks, you have an incredible quality that most of his contemporaries didn´t get by then!

Mon Nov 20, 2006 5:51 pm

jeanno wrote:There is obviously an artistic decline during the 70´s. Nevertheless, instead of focusing on the negative side, why not talking too about the highlights? (And there were many.) OK, the Jungleroom sessions may not be as interesting or historical as those at Sun Records, but the way EP took a little honky tonk song like SHE THINKS I STILL CARE and re-invented it (listen to that awesome alternate take 2B) shows that the artist - lazy or not - was still there. Same thing for BRIDGE OVER TROUBLED WATER, MERRY CHRISTMAS BABY (his best Blues performance next to RECONSIDER BABY), AMAZING GRACE, ALWAYS ON MY MIND, SEPARATE WAYS, I´VE GOT A THING ABOUT YOU BABY, PROMISED LAND, TIGER MAN (another Bluesy beauty) or HURT. Live: WALK A MILE IN MY SHOES, NEVER BEEN TO SPAIN or STEAMROLLER BLUES.
Only with those 12 tracks, you have an incredible quality that most of his contemporaries didn´t get by then!


Well said jeanno!

Mon Nov 20, 2006 8:31 pm

drjohncarpenter wrote:
3577 wrote:
drjohncarpenter wrote:
3577 wrote:The KISS archives is [sic] filled with unreleased material.

Oh yeah, it's full of something all right.

I took a long time for a useless repsonse, Doccie-Boy.

It's nice to read you finally admit your replies are useless.

Everyone else already knows!

Bwaah-haa-haa!


Please, stop breathing. You will make a lot of people happy.

Nighty-night......or what ever gay-talk you do, Doccie-Boy..............
Last edited by 3577 on Mon Nov 20, 2006 8:50 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Mon Nov 20, 2006 8:36 pm

....I don't verbally trash him at every opportunity like you and your boss Ger, and I go above and beyond with my responses because of you and your amigo.

Please name one example where I verbally trash Elvis. I will then apologize to you. If one doesn't pad an answer like you would prefer, it does not mean they are verbally trashing The King. Ease up a little....

Mon Nov 20, 2006 8:44 pm

jeanno wrote:There is obviously an artistic decline during the 70´s. Nevertheless, instead of focusing on the negative side, why not talking too about the highlights? (And there were many.) OK, the Jungleroom sessions may not be as interesting or historical as those at Sun Records, but the way EP took a little honky tonk song like SHE THINKS I STILL CARE and re-invented it (listen to that awesome alternate take 2B) shows that the artist - lazy or not - was still there. Same thing for BRIDGE OVER TROUBLED WATER, MERRY CHRISTMAS BABY (his best Blues performance next to RECONSIDER BABY), AMAZING GRACE, ALWAYS ON MY MIND, SEPARATE WAYS, I´VE GOT A THING ABOUT YOU BABY, PROMISED LAND, TIGER MAN (another Bluesy beauty) or HURT. Live: WALK A MILE IN MY SHOES, NEVER BEEN TO SPAIN or STEAMROLLER BLUES.
Only with those 12 tracks, you have an incredible quality that most of his contemporaries didn´t get by then!


Jeanno... those tracks would make an excellent CD!

Mon Nov 20, 2006 10:18 pm

Cryogenic
More than a good CD, those songs can prove that EP was still an artist during the last 7 years of his life. This period is clearly dismissed by the general public who thinks that it was a complete waste. Well, not all at least. Don´t you think so?

Mon Nov 20, 2006 10:47 pm

midnightx wrote:
....I don't verbally trash him at every opportunity like you and your boss Ger, and I go above and beyond with my responses because of you and your amigo.

Please name one example where I verbally trash Elvis. I will then apologize to you. If one doesn't pad an answer like you would prefer, it does not mean they are verbally trashing The King. Ease up a little....


When you agree with somebody who verbally trashes him, isn't that the same thing?

Mon Nov 20, 2006 10:56 pm

jeanno wrote:More than a good CD, those songs can prove that EP was still an artist during the last 7 years of his life. This period is clearly dismissed by the general public who thinks that it was a complete waste. Well, not all at least. Don´t you think so?


Totally agree, jeanno.

He was only half as inspired in the later 70's as the 50's and 60s, but when he *was* inspired, the results were just as good.

The exclusion of tracks like "Sylvia", "Love Me, Love The Life I Lead", "Padre" and "It's Easy For You" on "The Essential 70's Masters" is criminal, IMO. The conviction! The understanding! The passion! If need be, the overdubs could have been removed, and what would have been left were the elements just described. Everyone shies away from the 70's Elvis. There is just cause for doing so, but still an injustice being performed whenever someone does, and many people do.

Mon Nov 20, 2006 11:14 pm

Cryogenic
He was only half as inspired in the later 70's as the 50's and 60s, but when he *was* inspired, the results were just as good.

Totally agree too, Cryo.

The exclusion of tracks like "Sylvia", "Love Me, Love The Life I Lead", "Padre" and "It's Easy For You" on "The Essential 70's Masters" is criminal, IMO.

I would add also EARLY MORNIN´ RAIN and IF YOU DON´T COME BACK, too of my favourit. 8)

Re: kiss/elvis

Tue Nov 21, 2006 8:18 pm

Tallhair AKA Ger Rijff wrote:... sorry, Sid, but its the truth. RCA had to move the recording

equipment to Graceland, simply because he didnt wanna leave

his house to do a proper studio recording... and no, he didn't have

the flu, he had much more serious problems...


But, how many artists would RCA have done that for? Maybe Elvis and Sinatra. That's big. Being in control.

I was living in Memphis at that time, and you just can't believe how desperate the public was for another Elvis album then. Word was that he was p*ssed, and didn't want to do the material he was "presented".

Besides, it's pretty cool to know that we have a few songs that were actually recorded in Graceland.

Re: kiss/elvis

Wed Nov 22, 2006 8:53 pm

InMemphis wrote:
Tallhair AKA Ger Rijff wrote:... sorry, Sid, but its the truth. RCA had to move the recording

equipment to Graceland, simply because he didnt wanna leave

his house to do a proper studio recording... and no, he didn't have

the flu, he had much more serious problems...


But, how many artists would RCA have done that for? Maybe Elvis and Sinatra. That's big. Being in control.

I was living in Memphis at that time, and you just can't believe how desperate the public was for another Elvis album then. Word was that he was p*ssed, and didn't want to do the material he was "presented".

Besides, it's pretty cool to know that we have a few songs that were actually recorded in Graceland.


The fact that recordings were done there may have been cool...but the underlying reasons for it were anything but cool, IMO.

Re: kiss/elvis

Wed Nov 22, 2006 9:58 pm

New Jersey Mike wrote:
InMemphis wrote:
Tallhair AKA Ger Rijff wrote:... sorry, Sid, but its the truth. RCA had to move the recording

equipment to Graceland, simply because he didnt wanna leave

his house to do a proper studio recording... and no, he didn't have

the flu, he had much more serious problems...


But, how many artists would RCA have done that for? Maybe Elvis and Sinatra. That's big. Being in control.

I was living in Memphis at that time, and you just can't believe how desperate the public was for another Elvis album then. Word was that he was p*ssed, and didn't want to do the material he was "presented".

Besides, it's pretty cool to know that we have a few songs that were actually recorded in Graceland.


The fact that recordings were done there may have been cool...but the underlying reasons for it were anything but cool, IMO.


You are quite right.The end results may be partially satisfying,but the day the RCA tuck drove up the driveway is a sad one.
Jak