All posts with more than 3000 Hits, prior to 2008

Sat Oct 07, 2006 9:35 pm

I think the Europeans tend to focus a little more on his work as an artist, while the Americans get caught up a bit more with his personal life. Given the fact that he was born and bred in the U.S., that's understandable. As far as support goes, Elvis has always been greatly supported by his U.S. fans, Graceland alone is a testament to that.

Sat Oct 07, 2006 9:43 pm

The first time I visited the US, when I said I liked Elvis, most people looked at me like saying "Are you serious?". They considered it a thing of the past and others told me "Yeah, he was a good singer but did a lot of bad things during his life"

I don't know, maybe it's the consequence of too much mockering in the tabloids during the 80's, and the image of impersonators, not to mention some people (most of them from a low cultural background) telling they still believe Elvis is alive and well working in a Kalamazoo's Burger King.

Sat Oct 07, 2006 9:46 pm

Spanish_Eyes wrote:The first time I visited the US, when I said I liked Elvis, most people looked at me like saying "Are you serious?". They considered it a thing of the past and others told me "Yeah, he was a good singer but did a lot of bad things during his life"

I don't know, maybe it's the consequence of too much mockering in the tabloids during the 80's, and the image of impersonators, not to mention some people (most of them from a low cultural background) telling they still believe Elvis is alive and well working in a Kalamazoo's Burger King.


I believe that generation is behind us now for the most part. It's changed a lot since the brutal eighties, early nineties.

Sat Oct 07, 2006 9:49 pm

Daryl wrote:Being an American, I'd like to throw my 2 cents in on this subject. Why do some European fans feel the need to justify that they've supported Elvis more than the Americans? I would surmise that it is because it gives them something to feel good about. Unfortunately some European fans take this to the extreme of bashing the American fans in the process, which is plain petty and unjust.

Don't get your feathers too ruffled, Daryl. I am an American too, and did not take this thread personally. It was a simple concern and nothing more.
Daryl wrote:Graceland is open year round and many Americans walk through those gates to see Elvis' home.

Sure they do, but how many of those Americans live in Memphis? It is human nature to sometimes take things close to us for granted. Many times, Elvis could cruise around Memphis and not be bothered. Let him try something like that in Indiana.
Daryl wrote:It would seem the problem some European fans have understanding is that as Americans we have alot of choices in what our interests in music, sports, television, movies, vacationing could be and sometimes Elvis gets put on the back burner from time to time. It's called having a life.

Now what did I just say about getting your feathers ruffled? Just because there are people in other countries who many be bigger Elvis fans than Joe Public, does not mean that they don't have a life. It simply means that they put Elvis in front of any other entertainer. I do the same and have a great life.
Daryl wrote:When I read in another thread Ger Rjiff commenting that FTD was started without any help from our American cousins I have to laugh.

You know as well as I do that Ger is a funny guy. Most of the time without even trying to be.
Daryl wrote:Has the FTD label really stopped bootleggers? Looking at the number of bootleg releases coming out in the last couple of years, I would say that it hasn't done the job.

I agree with you. They are coming fast and plenty and will not stop anytime soon (thankfully). Most of it comes from Europe and I'm glad we have such Elvis fans across the pond. They make this collector very happy.

To all fans abroad:
Thank you for being such fanatics and keep those imports a comin'!

Sat Oct 07, 2006 10:21 pm

For what I saw in the US, it seems that if you say you're an Elvis fan, most of the people will tell you "Do you wear cheesy jumpsuits and fake sideburns, don't you"? And "Do you believe Elvis is still alive"? Sad...


I think one of the reasons Elvis is well respected in Europe is the fact that we haven't seen perform live here...our contact was more a romantic an iconic one than that of the US

Sat Oct 07, 2006 10:27 pm

Spanish_Eyes wrote:For what I saw in the US, it seems that if you say you're an Elvis fan, most of the people will tell you "Do you wear cheesy jumpsuits and fake sideburns, don't you"? And "Do you believe Elvis is still alive"? Sad...


I think one of the reasons Elvis is well respected in Europe is the fact that we haven't seen perform live here...our contact was more a romantic an iconic one than that of the US


Everything you describe is applicable this side of the pond. I daresay that Elvis is more loved in America than anywhere else. But he gets his share of derision, as do his fans, everywhere.

Sat Oct 07, 2006 10:37 pm

The U.K. fans are the greatest Elvis has here in Europe..without a doubt.

Here in Germany ..Elvis hasn`t this great popularity..IMO..

..and he never had...sorry to say this..the Beatles..yes..

Sun Oct 08, 2006 3:13 am

If I remember well.In the eightees.Elvis was far more into the scene in Germany then he was in the Netherlands , I remember I was buying the magazine BRAVO a lot in th 80's, he was hot then in Germany , Every Bravo magazine at that time had an Elvi topic ,stickers or whatever, but for the last few years not even Elvis The Concert is coming to Germany. It's just a matter of getting the right people to push it. if you have the right people at the right place, it will just work out fine with our Elvis !
At the end there will be only ONE KIng and that's our little Elvis you got that?
If you are a negro,a moslim , Black or white Elvis will always be the #1 ever!

Sun Oct 08, 2006 10:18 am

There is some truth in the idea that it is Europe , Australia and other places outside the US that are keeping the Elvis flame burning.

A recent example was ALLC, which was a worldwide smash hit except in one country !

Guess where ?

.

Sun Oct 08, 2006 10:21 am

Yugoslavia?

Re: .

Sun Oct 08, 2006 10:23 am

Blue-Gypsy wrote:Yugoslavia?


Close enough.

do you think

Sun Oct 08, 2006 12:46 pm

... > Rob : " you know as well as I do that Ger is a funny guy most

of the time without even trying to be..." <

It comes natural, Rob! :wink: Its a gift, I guess?

The problem with American Elvis fandom was/ is : from day one

onwards there was never a club that covered the whole of the US and

would unite fans from every state together. There were countless

fanclubs, like the one operated by Gary Pepper, in Memphis, during

the early 60s. And it was a good one! There was Strictly Elvis and

Elvis World. All concentrating on his music for the most part.

... But they didnt have more than a thousand members/ readers

in their hey day. Almost all other clubs, hundreds of them, were run

by ladies for ladies. And, with a small percentage interested in

more than "who can write the sweetest Happy birthday Elvis poem",

it was all a local thing. No discussions about his music, movies,

whatsoever... In Europe , Australia, Asia, etc , the Elvis world was

dominated by men. Guys who dug in to his music, his background,

the lot.


... Yes, Elvis was an American, his musicians, backing vocalists and

studio engineers were... but no American fans had a hand in finding

out more about them. Sun Records? No Americans knew he had

ever recorded for this label, till the late 60s, after English and Dutch

fans had travelled to Memphis, and started digging! And there's

hundreds of other Elvis related topics we found out, and shared with

you yanks.

Sun Oct 08, 2006 12:54 pm

Daryl wrote: Unfortunately some European fans take this to the extreme of bashing the American fans in the process


You mean, just like your bizarre attacks and sick poems on AEK (remember the one to the tune of 'Big Boss Man')?

Crazy, Man, Crazy.

.

Sun Oct 08, 2006 12:58 pm

I have never wrote a poem to the tune of Big Boss Man.

I once penned a little ditty using the prose to Somewhere Over The Rainbow.